chapter 7 demand forecasting in a supply chain n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Chapter 7 Demand Forecasting in a Supply Chain PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Chapter 7 Demand Forecasting in a Supply Chain

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 13

Chapter 7 Demand Forecasting in a Supply Chain - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 146 Views
  • Uploaded on

Forecasting - 3 Demand Pooling Ardavan Asef-Vaziri Based on Operations management: Stevenson Operations Management: Jacobs, Chase, and Aquilano Supply Chain Management: Chopra and Meindl. Chapter 7 Demand Forecasting in a Supply Chain. Aggregate Demand.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Chapter 7 Demand Forecasting in a Supply Chain


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Forecasting - 3 Demand Pooling ArdavanAsef-Vaziri Based on Operations management: Stevenson Operations Management: Jacobs, Chase, and Aquilano Supply Chain Management: Chopra and Meindl Chapter 7Demand Forecastingin a Supply Chain

    2. Aggregate Demand • A firm produces Red and Blue T-Shirts. How much safety stock

    3. Forecasts and Probability Distributions

    4. Forecasts and Probability Distributions • Suppose the company stocks 956 T-shirts, the forecasted number. What is the probability the company will have a stockout, that is, that there will not be enough T-shirts to satisfy demand? • The company does not want to have unsatisfied demand, as that would be lost revenue. So the company overstocks. Suppose the company stocks 1,026 units. • What is the probability that the actual demand will be larger than 1,026?

    5. There is a Distribution Around the Forecasted Sale Standard Deviation of Error = 1.25 MAD • Error is assumed to NORMALLY DISTRIBUTED with • A MEAN (AVERAGE) = 0 • STANDARD DEVIATION = 1.25* MAD

    6. How many to stock Suppose the company desires that the probability of not being able to meet demand is 2.5% Look-up on normal table (show using book)

    7. How many to stock

    8. Forecasts and Probability Distributions

    9. Blue Product Inventory Level • The stocking level, of the blue product, for period 11 is: 987+1.96*(1.25*410)=1991 • Recall that: amt. stocked = forecast + 1.96x1.25xMAD implies the probability of not satisfying demand is P( demand > amt. stocked ) = 0.025.

    10. Total Inventory Level • The total inventory for Red and Blue is: 1892 + 1728 = 3620 • P( Red demand > # of Red T-shirts stocked ) = 0.025 P( Blue demand > # of Blue T-shirts stocked ) = 0.025

    11. Aggregate Forecasts • Can we more accurately forecast the combined demand? • Suppose we can make Gray Shirt and then dye the T-shirts either red or blue. • What is the Demand for Gray Shirts? • We look at the sum of the demands in the past • We forecast the demand for the two products combined • We compute the MAD for the aggregate forecast

    12. Forecast for the Aggregate Demand Inventory of Gray = 1942 + 1.96*1.25*717 = 3699 Compared to 3883

    13. Aggregate Demand Forecast Conclusions • By stocking 3699 Gray T-shirts, we ensure P( T-shirt demand > # stocked ) = 0.025 • Otherwise, we needed to stock 1892 blue T-shirts and 1991 red T-shirts for a combined number of 1892+1991 = 3883 T-shirts to ensure that P( red T-shirt demand > # red shirts stocked) = P( blue T-shirt demand > # blue shirts stocked) = 0.025 • 3699 < 3883 … we need to stock less T-shirts to ensure a given stockout probability (2.5% in this example) when we have an aggregate forecast.