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What is Peace Psychology: Post-Cold War Era. Daniel J. Christie Professor Emeritus of Psychology Ohio State University USA. Definitions of “ Peace ”. “‘ Peace ’ can be regarded as ‘ absence of violence ’” and

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what is peace psychology post cold war era

What is Peace Psychology: Post-Cold War Era

Daniel J. Christie

Professor Emeritus of Psychology

Ohio State University

USA

definitions of peace
Definitions of “Peace”

“‘Peace’ can be regarded as ‘absence of violence’” and

“violence is present when human beings are being influenced so that their actual somatic and mental realizations are below their potential realizations.” (Galtung, JPR, 1969)

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http://academic.marion.ohio-state.edu/dchristie/Peace%20Psychology%20Book.htmlhttp://academic.marion.ohio-state.edu/dchristie/Peace%20Psychology%20Book.html

peace psychology defined
Peace Psychology Defined

Peace psychology seeks to develop theories and practices aimed at the prevention and mitigation of direct and structural violence. Framed positively, peace psychology promotes the nonviolent management of conflict and the pursuit of social justice, what we refer to as peacemaking and peacebuilding, respectively (Christie et al., 2001, p.7).

episodic structural violence violence

A More Differentiated Perspective

Episodic Structural Violence Violence
  • Also called direct  Also called indirect

violence violence

  • Kills/harms quickly  Kills/harms slowly
  • Intermittent  Continuous
  • Acute insult to  Chronic insult to

well-being well-being

  • Episodes may be  Inertia may be

prevented mitigated

  • Dramatic  Normalized
episodic structural peacebuilding peacebuilding

A More Differentiated Perspective

Episodic StructuralPeacebuilding Peacebuilding
  • Reduces violent  Reduces structural

episodes violence

  • Emphasizes  Emphasizes social

nonviolence justice

  • Seeks to prevent  Seeks to ameliorate

violent episodes structural violence

  • Produces tension  Produces tension

reduction enhancement

  • Uses cooperation  Uses noncooperation
  • Supports status quo  Challenges status quo
domain of peace psychology
Domain of Peace Psychology

Episodic Structural

Intermittent & Direct

Continuous & Indirect

Violence

Contact & Nonviolent

Conflict Management

Nonviolent Movement

towards Socially Just

Arrangements

Peace

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Table of Contents.pdf

Foreword (M. Brewster Smith).pdf

Preface (Christie, Wagner, & Winter).pdf

Introduction to Peace Psychology (Christie, Wagner, & Winter).pdf

Section I - Direct Violence (Wagner).pdf

Chapter 1 - Intimate Violence (Abrahams).pdf

Chapter 2 - Anti Gay & Lesbian Violence (Cody Murphy).pdf

Chapter 3 - Intrastate Violence (Niens & Cairns).pdf

Chapter 4 - Nationalism & War (Druckman).pdf

Chapter 5 - Integrative Complexity, War & Peace (Conway, Suedfeld, & Tetlock).pdf

Chapter 6 - Genocide and Mass Killing (Staub).pdf

Chapter 7 - Weapons of Mass Destruction (Britton).pdf

Chapter 8 - Social Injustice (Opotow).pdf

Section II - Structural Violence (Winter & Leighton).pdf

Chapter 9 - Children & Violence in the US (Kostelny & Garbarino).pdf

Chapter 10 - Children & Structural Violence (Schwebel & Christie).pdf

Chapter 11 - Women, Girls, & Structural Violence (Mazurana & McKay).pdf

Chapter 12 - Understanding Militarism (Winter, Pilisuk, Houck, & Lee).pdf

Chapter 13 - Globalism & Structural Violence (Pilisuk).pdf

Chapter 14 - Human Rights (Lykes).pdf

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Section III - Peacemaking (Wagner).pdf

Chapter 15 - Peacekeeping (Langholtz & Leentjes).pdf

Chapter 16 - The Cultural Context of Peacemaking (Pedersen).pdf

Chapter 17 - Confict Resolution (Sanson & Bretherton).pdf

Chapter 18 - Psychology & the TRANSCEND Approach (Galtung & Tschudi).pdf

Chapter 19 - Cooperation & Conflict Resolution in Schools (Coleman & Deutsch).pdf

Chapter 20 - Reducing Trauma during Ethnopolitical Conflict (Agger).pdf

Chapter 21 - Reconciliation in Divided Societies (de la Rey).pdf

Chapter 22 - Psychosocial Intervention & Post War Reconstruction (Wessells & Monteiro).pdf

Section IV - Peacebuilding (Christie).pdf

Chapter 23 - Structural Peacebuilding (Montiel).pdf

Chapter 24 - Psychologies for Liberation (Dawes).pdf

Chapter 25 - Gandhi as Peacebuilder (Mayton).pdf

Chapter 26 - Peacebuilding & Nonviolence (Steger).pdf

Chapter 27 - Children's Perspectives on Peace (Hakvoort & Hagglund).pdf

Chapter 28 - Empowerment Based Interventions (Webster & Perkins).pdf

Chapter 29 - Gendering Peacebuilding (McKay & Mazurana).pdf

Chapter 30 - Psychologists Building Cultures of Peace (Wessells, Schwebel & Anderson).pdf

Conclusion (Winter, Christie, Wagner, & Boston).pdf

goals of peace psychology
“Increase and apply psychological knowledge in the pursuit of peace ... [including] both the absence of destructive conflict and the creation of positive social conditions which minimize destructiveness and promote human well-being.”

(Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict, and Violence, 2006)

Goals of Peace Psychology
the earth provides enough for everyone s needs but not everyone s greed

The earth provides enough for everyone’s needs, but not everyone’s greed.

Contemporary Peace Psychology includes social justice within its purview

Mahatma Gandhi

(1869-1948)

social psychology and peace an introductory overview
Social Psychology and Peace: An Introductory Overview

(Cohrs & Boehnke, SP, 2008)

  • Obstacles to negative (episodic) peace
    • intergroup aggression, right-wing extremism, support for war, etc.
  • Catalysts of negative peace
    • intergroup contact, reconciliation, peace activism, etc.
  • Obstacles to positive (structural) peace
    • social dominance, ethnic discrimination, legitimizing ideologies, etc.
  • Catalysts of positive peace
    • relative privilege, minority influence, support for human rights, etc.
peace obstacles catalysts cohrs boehnke sp 2008
Peace Obstacles & Catalysts(Cohrs & Boehnke, SP, 2008)

Obstacles Catalysts

Negative

Peace

intergroup aggression,

right-wing extremism, support for war

  • intergroup contact, reconciliation, peace activism, etc.

Positive

Peace

social dominance, ethnic discrimination, legitimizing ideologies, etc.

relative privilege, minority influence, support for human rights, etc.