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ELA Seminar. Quarter 2 2012-2013. Drill 11/7. Objective: Students will learn about drama in order to analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.

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ela seminar

ELA Seminar

Quarter 2

2012-2013

drill 11 7
Drill 11/7
  • Objective: Students will learn about drama in order to analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.
  • Drill: What do you think of when you hear the word “theater?”
drill 11 8
Drill 11/8
  • Objective: Students will learn about drama in order to analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.
  • Drill: List at least three fairy tails that you know well. What is it about these stories that you enjoy?
fairytales in a minute
Fairytales in a minute!
  • Each group picks one fairytale.
  • First come first serve. Once a fairytale is chosen no other group may use the fairytale.
  • Don’t tell any other group which fairytale you pick.
  • You will have ten minutes to create a skit which tells the entire fairytale.
  • Your skit can only be one minute long.
  • Other groups will try to guess your fairytale.
  • Think about performance elements that will help communicate your fairytale.
drill 11 9
Drill 11/9
  • Objective: Students will learn about drama in order to analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.
  • Drill: What did you learn about communicating in the fairytales in a minute activity?
  • What do you think you could do to improve your communication skills?
how to
How to
  • Get with your 9:00 partner.
  • The actor begins acting out the how to activity.
  • The actor pauses every few steps so the interpreter can explain what is happening.
  • Continue the scene until you have completely explained how to do the activity.
drill 11 12
Drill 11/12
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Drill: Science fiction is a type of fiction that is based on real or imagined scientific and technological advancements. Sometimes set in futuristic worlds or on other planets and may include time travel or extraterrestrial beings.
  • Create a list of books, movies, or television programs which you think fit this definition.
drill 11 13
Drill 11/13
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Drill: Which drama element do you think is the most important for communicating mood during a theatrical production?
  • Explain your answer.
drill 11 14
Drill 11/14
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Drill: Write a short summary of Act I of “The Trouble with Tribbles.”
  • Make a prediction about what you think will happen next.
drill 11 15
Drill 11/15
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Drill:
  • Make a prediction about what you think will happen next in the teleplay “Trouble With Tribbles.”
drill 11 16
Drill 11/16
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Drill: Write a short summary of Act 4 of “The Trouble with Tribbles.”
drill 11 19
Drill 11/19
  • Objective: Students will analyze the extent to which a filmed drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.
  • Drill: Complete the Main Idea practice sheet.
drill 11 26
Drill 11/26
  • Objective: Students will analyze the extent to which a filmed drama stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made by the director or actors.
  • Drill: Compare the written and television version of the “Trouble with Tribbles.”
  • You can make a T-chart or Venn Diagram. Then write at least two sentences.
drill 11 27
Drill 11/27
  • Objective: Students will analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
  • Drill: Copy these definitions down.
  • Cause: The reason events happen in a story. Ask: Why did it happen?
  • Effect: What happens. Ask: What happened?
drill 11 28
Drill 11/28
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text in order to understand characterization.
  • Drill: Complete your cause and effect paragraph. Remember a proper heading, write in pen, include a complex sentence.
drill 11 29
Drill 11/29
  • Objective: Students will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
  • Drill: What do you think happened to the Tribbles once they were beamed to the Klingon ship?
  • (Write two to three sentences)
drill 11 30
Drill 11/30
  • Objective: Students will complete the DRP in order to assess reading levels.
  • Drill: Sit at a table by yourself. Move a desk if you need to. Put your ELA project book on your desk. Have a pencil ready to use.
  • We are finishing the DRP today.
drill 12 3
Drill 12/3
  • Objective: Students will use organizers to establish a context and point of view in order to engage the reader.
  • Drill: Copy these definitions:
  • Predicate noun: Completes or compliments the subject. Follows the verb “to be.”
    • This is milk.
  • Predicate adjective: Modifies the subject.
  • This is milky.
drill 12 4
Drill 12/4
  • Objective: Students will use technology to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently in order to write a short story.
  • Drill: Get a computer, log on and set up a document with a proper heading.
  • Use your organizer to begin drafting your story.
drill 12 5
Drill 12/5
  • Objective: Students will use technology to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently in order to write a short story.
  • Drill: Get a computer, log on and set up a document with a proper heading.
  • Use your organizer to begin drafting your story.
drill 12 6
Drill 12/6
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text in order to determine theme.
  • Drill: Think about the themes from “The Scarlet Ibis” and “Flowers for Algernon.” In both stories the theme concerns how society treats people who are different. What general statement could you make about this theme based on the two stories?
drill 12 7
Drill 12/7
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text in order to determine theme.
  • Drill: “All Summer in a Day” focuses on a person who is different from her peers. How is Margot similar to Doodle and Charlie?
drill 12 10
Drill 12/10
  • Objective: Students will compare and contrast the main characters of two or more texts in order to analyze how the differing characters of each text contributes to its meaning.
  • Drill: Finish looking for figurative language in “All Summer in a Day.”
  • Highlight and label.
drill 12 11
Drill 12/11
  • Objective: Students will analyze the extent to which a filmed production of a story stays faithful to or departs from the text in order to evaluate the choices made by the director or actors.
  • Drill: Take out a piece of paper and create a T-Chart. Label the chart movie and story. As you view the video create a list of differences between the two versions of the story.
12 11 movie exit ticket
12/11 Movie Exit Ticket
  • Exit Ticket Question:
  • Pick one of the differences and evaluate how the change in the story effects your understanding of the story.
  • Is the theme of the story and the theme of the movie the same or different? Explain your answer.
drill 12 12
Drill 12/12
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of imagery in order to increase vocabulary and understanding of the writer’s craft.
  • Drill: Next slide
slide27

Describe this painting.

Use descriptive

words that

appeal to all

the senses.

drill 12 13
Drill 12/13
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of imagery in order to increase vocabulary and understanding of the writer’s craft.

Drill: Imagery is a literary technique that appeals to all the senses. Find a passage in “All Summer in a Day” that appeals to multiple senses.

What about this passage appeals to you?

drill 12 14
Drill 12 /14
  • Objective: Students will determine a theme of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot in order to provide an objective summary of the text.
  • Drill: A summary is a retelling of the important details of the text. With your table develop a list of major events in the short story “All Summer in a Day.”
drill 12 18
Drill 12/18
  • Objective: Students will use precise word choice in order to create free verse poems.
  • Drill: Use your diagramming packet to help you.
  • Diagram the following sentences.
    • Reindeer fly.
    • Santa and reindeer fly.
    • Santa flies and Ho-Ho-Ho’s.
    • There flies Santa.
    • Santa gives presents.
drill 12 19
Drill 12/19
  • Objective: Students will use a variety of reading skills in order to read informational text.
  • Drill: Label all the parts of speech in the sentences from yesterday.
  • You can write directly on the paper from yesterday.
drill 12 20
Drill 12/20
  • Objective: Students will use a variety of reading skills in order to read informational text.
  • Drill: Add punctuation to these sentences.
    • Santa’s reindeer are Dasher Dancer Prancer Vixen, Comet Cupid Donner and Blitzen.
    • Santa the jolly old elf drives a sleigh full of toys.
    • Santa knows who is naughty or nice, but he likes the nice kids better.
  • For each sentence write the punctuation rule to follow.
drill 12 21
Drill 12/21
  • Objective: Students will identify elements of fantasy in order to evaluate the type of genre of a film.
  • Drill: What brought Frosty to life?
slide34

Old silk hat they found.For when they placed it on his headHe began to dance around.

Merry Christmas and

Happy New Year!

drill 1 2 2013
Drill 1/2/2013
  • Objective: Students will use narrative techniques such as dialogue and description in order to develop characters.
  • Drill: Complete a character wheel for any character we have meet in either English or Seminar. Think about what the character does, says, thinks, and how others react to the character.
drill 1 3 2013
Drill 1/3/2013
  • Objective: Students will, with some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.
  • Drill: Revise the following sentences for present tense.
  • 1. We moved to a random house; we found a big door.
  • 2. It is December 4, 3075, this creature came to Earth and took over.
  • 3. One day they were spotted everywhere on Earth.
drill 1 4 2013
Drill 1/4/2013
  • Objective: Students will use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well
  • as to interact and collaborate with others.
  • Drill: Revise the following sentences for subject-verb agreement.
  • 1. Kirk and Spock (is/are) in charge of the Enterprise.
  • 2. Tribbles (run/runs) wild on the ship.
  • 3. Neither the Kinglon ship or the Enterprise (want/wants) the Tribbles.
drill 1 7 2013
Drill 1/7/2013
  • Objective: Students will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Identify the comma rule followed in each of these sentences.
  • 1. Kirk, Spock, and McCoy all work on the Enterprise.
  • 2. Kirk, the captain, is in charge of the ship.
  • 3. When the Tribbles got on the ship, they eat all of the grain.
  • 4. The Earthmen do not want Tribbles on the enterprise, and the Klingons hate Tribbles.
drill 1 8 2013
Drill 1/8/2013
  • Objective: Students will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Drill: Take out your comma packet and review the comma rules you struggled with. Make sure you understand when to use a comma and, just as importantly, when not to use a comma.
apostrophe shows possession
Apostrophe shows possession
  • Rewrite the phrase using apostrophe s to show possession.
  • 1. The chair of Mrs. Demos
  • 2.
drill 1 9 2013
Drill 1/9/2013
  • Objective: Students will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Drill: Take out the comma packet and the apostrophe packet. Review all the rules. Make sure you understand why a comma is used and when to use the apostrophe.
drill 1 10 2013
Drill 1/10/2013
  • Objective: Students will demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
  • Drill: Independently, complete the comma and apostrophe review sheet you picked up on the way in.
drill 1 11 13
Drill 1/11/13
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • Drill: Take out your Science World and pick one article to read. Determine the main idea of the article.
drill 1 14 13
Drill 1/14/13
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly in order to respond to text dependent questions.
  • Drill:
  • 1. Go to page 9 in the diagramming packet.
  • 2. Identify the subject and predicate in each sentence.
  • 3. Circle each adjective.
drill 1 15 13
Drill 1/15/13
  • Objective: Students will cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly in order to respond to text dependent questions.
  • Drill:
  • 1. Complete the Sentences with adjectives and adverbs handout. I will be looking to see that you use CUCC on the directions. This will be collected and graded.
walrus and the carpenter
Walrus and the Carpenter

1. Silently read the poem “The Walrus and the Carpenter” by Lewis Carroll.

2. Annotate on your paper by:

  • Questioning the text
  • Identifying figures of speech
  • Visualizing
  • Making connections
drill 1 16 13
Drill 1/16/13
  • Objective: Students will be able to use symbols and figurative language in order understand poetry.
  • Drill:
    • Go to page 10 in the diagramming packet.
    • Identify the subject and predicate of each sentence.
    • Circle the adverbs.
    • Write ADJ over the adjectives.
1 16 13 exit ticket
1/16/13 Exit Ticket
  • Take out a piece of paper and put a proper heading on the paper.
  • Based on the paraphrasing, figurative language and other annotation, write a summary of the section of the poem you helped to paraphrase.
  • Include the section number in your title.
  • Remember a summary is a retelling of the main ideas of a text using your own words.
drill 1 17 13
Drill 1/17/13
  • Objective: Students will compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.
  • Drill: Answer the following questions in three to five sentences.
    • What kinds of problems to people experience in life?
    • What gives some people the determination to overcome these problems?
activity 1 17 13
Activity 1/17/13
  • Put a proper heading on a paper.
  • Create a T-Chart
  • Record your inferences about the speaker of the poem.
  • Make a final inference about what all of these clues tell the reader about the speaker of the poem.
free verse
Free Verse
  • Both poems are written in Free Verse.
  • There have some differences as well.
  • Create a T-Chart that compares the two poems.
  • Look at things like rhyme scheme, punctuation, line length, stanzas.
  • What do these differences tell the reader about the poems.
exit ticket 1 17
Exit Ticket 1/17
  • Take out a piece of paper and put a proper heading on the paper.
  • Answer the following questions in complete sentences.
    • Which poem seems more hopeful?
    • Which of the two poems do you think offers the best advice for a teenager today? Give reasons for your choice.