slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Redevelopment Agency Policies: A slippery slope between gentrification & community development CASE STUDY of CENTRA PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Redevelopment Agency Policies: A slippery slope between gentrification & community development CASE STUDY of CENTRA

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 26

Redevelopment Agency Policies: A slippery slope between gentrification & community development CASE STUDY of CENTRA - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 132 Views
  • Uploaded on

Redevelopment Agency Policies: A slippery slope between gentrification & community development CASE STUDY of CENTRAL LONG BEACH PROJECT REDEVELOPMENT AREA. BACKGROUND : Study Area. POLICY QUESTION. Do Redevelopment Agency Policies facilitate the gentrification process?

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Redevelopment Agency Policies: A slippery slope between gentrification & community development CASE STUDY of CENTRA' - shawn


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Redevelopment Agency Policies: A slippery slope between gentrification & community developmentCASE STUDY of CENTRAL LONG BEACH PROJECT REDEVELOPMENT AREA

policy question
POLICY QUESTION

Do Redevelopment Agency Policies facilitate the gentrification process?

If so, what can community members and stakeholders do to mitigate the negative effects of ‘gentrification through redevelopment’?

long beach city boundary
LONG BEACH City Boundary

Created by Maidel Luevano

Sources: 2005 – 2009 American Community Survey, Census Bureau, ESRI, UCLA Mapshare

long beach facts and figures
LONG BEACH Facts and Figures
  • 2nd largest city in Los Angeles County
  • Population – 461,522
  • Total households – 163,088
  • Median Income – $50,040

Sources: 2005 – 2009 American Community Survey, Census Bureau, City of Long Beach Website

long beach demographics
LONG BEACH Demographics

Created by Maidel Luevano

Sources: 2005 – 2009 American Community Survey, Census Bureau, ESRI

long beach race ethnicity distribution
LONG BEACH Race & Ethnicity Distribution

Created by Maidel Luevano

Sources: 2005 – 2009 American Community Survey, Census Bureau, ESRI, UCLA Mapshare

long beach lowest income buffer
LONG BEACH Lowest Income Buffer

Created by Maidel Luevano

Sources: 2005 – 2009 American Community Survey, Census Bureau, ESRI, UCLA Mapshare

long beach lowest income concentration
LONG BEACH Lowest Income Concentration

Created by Maidel Luevano

Sources: 2005 – 2009 American Community Survey, Census Bureau, ESRI, UCLA Mapshare

long beach highest need areas hot spot analysis
LONG BEACH “Highest Need Areas” Hot Spot Analysis

Created by Maidel Luevano

Sources: 2005 – 2009 American Community Survey, Census Bureau, ESRI, UCLA Mapshare

slide13

LB RDA Central Project Area Timeline 1992-Present

Central Long Beach Project Redevelopment Area formally adopted

Annual Report published highlighting major redevelopment projects

September 1993

December 2009

April 1992

Los Angels Riots

Structural damage to Central Long Beach area buildings totaled more than $19 million

March 2001

Redevelopment Agency Board and City Council reapprove the adoption of the project area

slide14

LB RDA Central Project Area Blight Survey

  • Built Environment
  • Deterioration and Dilapidation to structures in 20% of all blocks within the Project Area
  • Defective Design and character of physical construction: illegal garage conversions, “bootlegged” additions, additions that reflect poor craftsmanship utilizing scrap material, with little regard to integration to original design
  • 50% of building stock built pre-1950
  • Shifting Use indicating that private enterprise is either unwilling or unable to invest sufficient capital to construct or rehabilitate properties to meet modern space or market requirements
  • Incompatible Uses
  • Vacancies
  • Ownership Patterns: Many commercially zoned areas in the Project Area are made up of narrow or shallow lots, requiring the assembly of two or more lots to accommodate expansion or new development. Such lots are often under individual ownership, making private assembly difficult and time consuming. Higher density or updated development is unlikely without a major land assembly effort.
  • Social
  • Rapid Population Growth: managing increasing demand for public services and proper delivery of those services
  • Population is much younger on the whole than the City average, leading to problems with gangs, drugs and related criminal activity. Educational levels are also lower than City averages, indicating a trend toward a growing disparity between the educated and the under-educated
  • Lower Median Income in the Project Area is a significant blighting influence: residents have little disposable income to maintain or improve properties, it is common for more than one household to share a dwelling so it is affordable, low Project Area incomes makes business attraction challenging and new business survival tenuous
  • Inadequate Amount of Public Space
  • High Crime Rates: the perception of the Project Area as a dangerous place to live and work discourages in-migration of relatively affluent residents, new business owners and investors, and often makes favorable financing difficult to obtain
  • Economic
  • Impaired Investments:
    • negative taxable retail sales tax trends
    • low commercial building permit activity
    • high business turnover
    • low stability
    • high commercial vacancy rates
    • large number of vacant and underutilized lots
    • wholesale relocation of the new sales business out of the Project Area

Source: Long Beach Redevelopment Agency 2004-2009 Five Year Implementation Plan

slide15

LB RDA Central Project Area Boundary & Expenses Overview

Central Long Beach Redevelopment Project Area

Created by Maidel Luevano

Source: Long Beach Redevelopment Agency 2009 Annual Report

Source: Long Beach Redevelopment Agency 2009 Annual Report

slide16

LB RDA Central Project Area Major Development Projects

Central Long Beach Redevelopment Project Area

Created by Maidel Luevano

Source: Long Beach Redevelopment Agency

Source: Long Beach Redevelopment Agency 2009 Annual Report

slide18

LB RDA Central Project Area Proposed Service Areas

Central Long Beach Redevelopment Project Area

Source: Long Beach Redevelopment Agency

Created by Maidel Luevano

slide19

LB RDA Central Project Area Service Area Collaboration Opportunities

Central Long Beach Redevelopment Project Area

1 mile

0.6 mile

Source: Long Beach Redevelopment Agency

Created by Maidel Luevano

slide21

LB RDA Central Project Area Service Area Recommendations

  • Demand a more transparent, collaborative approach to the “blight removal” process between existing residents, stakeholders, RDA, investors and developers
  • Demand the RDA to take risks in utilizing redevelopment funding to support nontraditional, grassroots efforts for addressing the needs of the service areas. Rethinking how traditional redevelopment funding streams like those listed below can be towards these grassroots efforts:
    • Community Development Block Grants
    • Neighborhood Improvement Strategy Areas program
    • Neighborhood Stabilization Programs
    • Commercial Corridor Improvement Programs
    • Neighborhood Home Improvement Rebate Programs
    • Affordable Housing Programs
    • Business Improvement Districts
    • Enterprise Zones
slide22

LB RDA Central Project Area Innovative Redevelopment Examples from Throughout Los Angeles and Beyond

Examples of Existing Projects/Collaborations

Los Angeles Neighborhood Land Trust

The Trust for Public Land

Strategic Actions for a Just Economy

Right to the City Alliance

  • Examples of Potential Projects/Collaborations
  • Community Land Banks as a means to:
    • preserve long-term affordable housing using CDBG money
    • assist local economic development efforts by supporting small to medium sized businesses (i.e. lowering the barriers to entry)
    • present an alternative model to neighborhood redevelopment
  • Community led adaptive reuse projects of existing liquor stores into healthy food corner stores
  • Earmarking RDA funds to support immediate and long-term community organizing efforts focusing on increasing neighborhood participation in the redevelopment process
slide26

SKILLS USED

SLIDE NUMBER

  • 7, 24
  • 25
  • 18, 19
  • 19
  • 9, 15
  • 5, 13, 14, 15, 16
  • 11
  • 4, 8, 9, 15
  • 8, 9
  • 4, 9
  • 9, 18
  • 16, 19
  • Modeling
  • Metadata
  • Analysis
  • Measurement
  • Original Data
  • Charts, Graphs, Images
  • Hot Spot Analysis
  • Inset map
  • Point or line graduated symbol
  • Boundary sub-sets selections
  • Buffering
  • Geocoding