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ISU Recycling

ISU Recycling

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ISU Recycling

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  1. ISU Recycling Vision Statement “Our passionate concern for the environment inspires us to have sustainable reduce, reuse, recycle programs, which generate an environmentally conscious Iowa State University community.” For more information contact ISU Recycling at recycling@iastate.edu or visit our web site at www.fpm.iastate.edu/recycling/. February 2009

  2. Recycling at ISU • Campus recycling started in 1992 • White paper recycling • Expanded to include: Phone books, Newspaper, Corrugated cardboard, and Confidential paper. • We engage local partners • International Paper • Iron Mountain • Ames Area Redemption Center • Cycles Recycling, a local bicycle delivery service.

  3. Paper Product Recycling • White Paper • Newspaper • Cardboard • Phone Books • Confidential Document Destruction

  4. White Paper Recycling • Collect from 106 campus buildings • Most offices/individuals and many classrooms/labs are provided with small desk-side bin • Weekly, custodial staff take large bins to a central collection point and Campus Services staff collect the paper in a packer truck. • Paper is delivered to International Paper of Des Moines • Average 11 Tons per Month

  5. White Paper Recycling Volumes

  6. Newspaper Recycling • Collect from 36 campus buildings • Cycles Recycling collects the newspapers, checking each location several times per week • Newspapers collected are recycled by International Paper out of Des Moines • USA TODAY provides and empties newspaper recycling bins in 16 Residence Halls • Average 8 Tons per Month

  7. Newspaper Recycling Volumes

  8. Cardboard Recycling • Collect Cardboard from 50 Campus buildings • Cardboard is collected by Ames Area Redemption • Collection per building is based on volumes generated • This free collection service saves ISU nearly $1,275 per month in refuse disposal expenses • Our vendor estimates collecting 17 Tons per month

  9. Phone Book Recycling • Volunteers (students and staff) collect phone books from 79 pick-up locations • Phone Books are recycled by International Paper out of Des Moines • This volunteer service saved ISU nearly $1,200 in refuse disposal expenses • 16 Tons were collected December 2008

  10. Phone Book Recycling Volumes

  11. Confidential Document Destruction • Collect from 52 campus buildings • Iron Mountain collects and delivers materials to their facility in Des Moines • Material is shredded, baled and stored until shipped to a paper mill for recycling • Average 5 Tons per Month

  12. Document Destruction Volumes

  13. FY08 Recycling Volumes

  14. Resources Conserved in 2008

  15. Other ISURecycling Programs

  16. Computer Monitor and Fluorescent Lamp Recovery/Recycling for 2008

  17. Recycled 40 tons ofE-Scrap in 2008

  18. ISU Surplus • Provides an outlet for departmental reuse, resale, and redistribution of excess equipment and furniture • Departmental sale every Tuesday from 10 a.m until noon • Last year, $250,000 of usable assets were returned to service in other university departments • ISU Surplus is located at 1102 Southern Hills Drive

  19. University Compost Facility • Original compost site opened in 1993 • In 2002, site moved to ISU Dairy Farm on Mortensen Rd • The University Compost Facility moves to the new Dairy Facility in 2009 • Divert 605 tons of yard waste • ISU Farms will provide 21,000 tons of animal waste • An estimated 600 tons of dining food waste will be composted in the future

  20. University Compost Facility cont. • Compost site will produce usable compost within three months • Generate approximately 10,500 tons of finished compost per year • All compost will be used on campus • Construction projects will use as a soil amendment to improve final topsoil quality • Campus Services will use as a soil amendment, top dressing, incorporating it into all campus landscaping projects

  21. Construction Project Recycling • Towers Demolition • 98% of the concrete was recycled • 60,000 tons concrete used at the new Dairy Facility • 98% non-concrete materials removed and recycled • Jack Trice Stadium East Concourse Project • 85% materials from old concession buildings recycled • Concrete, Steel, Copper, Bathroom Stalls, etc.

  22. Other Recycling Programs on Campus • Chemical/Brown Bottles • Chemical Redistribution Program • Free Wood/Pallet Program • Ink jet and Toner Cartridges • Oil Filters, Used Oil, Tires, Batteries • Power Plant Ash • Rechargeable Batteries • Scrap Metal • Shrink Wrap • Trees to furniture Program

  23. Recycling in ISU Residence Halls and Apartment Communities

  24. Residence Halls and Apartment Communities • In the Past: • Some recycling done in the halls by house chairs who took full responsibility • Newspaper Recycling offered at Frederiksen • Frederiksen pilot project done during May Move Out 2007

  25. Currently at Frederiksen Court • The Frederiksen Court Community Council surveyed residents in 2008 regarding recycling • Based on survey results, Council dollars were dedicate to begin a cans/bottles recycling program in fall 2008 • Fall 2008, first Sustainability Chair position on Council; first chair is Jessica Monk • Offer white paper and newspaper recycling • Working with the City of Ames on glass recycling • Coming soon—plastic grocery bag recycling

  26. Currently at University Village (SUV) • Megan Truebenbach, SUV resident, is developing a recycling program as her Honors Project • Surveyed residents • Designing recycling methodology and location • Future—work with City of Ames on glass recycling

  27. Currently in the Residence Halls • In October 2008 group of recycling chairs began meeting to discuss what was needed to enhance and improve their current recycling programs • Students identified • Containers • Transportation • What could be recycled in dens and halls • Educational program/materials

  28. Currently in the Residence Halls cont. • Department of Residence will provide: • Uniform containers • Transportation • Help develop an educational program • Development of Facilities and Residence Life staff support

  29. Currently in the Residence Halls cont. • This Semester, Students will develop: • Job description for and expectations of recycling chairs • Transportation preparation process • Ideas for educational materials • Ongoing support of student governance system

  30. Currently in the Residence Halls cont. • 65 of 126 houses have recycling, with new support, we hope this number will increase • Recycling programs that are developed in the halls will be adapted for Frederiksen and SUV • This will allow all campus communities to have supported, ongoing programs • Based on a recent meeting with UNI and Iowa, this program will be the largest student housing recycling program in the state

  31. ISU ReCYclesand Residence Halls Food Drive

  32. ISU ReCYcles • Sponsored by the Department of Residence and Facilities Planning and Management • Collect: • Clean, gently used clothing & shoes • Small household items in good condition • Furniture and small appliances in good condition • Electronics in working order • Items collected will be taken to either the Salvation Army or Goodwill

  33. Food Drive • Department of Residence will collect unopened, non-perishable food items • Collection starts Thursday, April 30 • Items will be donated to Bethesda and MICA food pantries • Items collected will be taken to either the Salvation Army or Goodwill

  34. Cleaning Out Your Cupboards? Don’t throw that food away! Bring unopened, non-perishable food to the Community Center during May Move Out 2008 Donations will be given to Story County families in need. Questions? Call the office at 4-2107 Organized by the Frederiksen Court Community Council

  35. Sustainability Initiatives Nancy Levandowski ISU Dining Director

  36. ISU Dining – minimizing impact • Recycle • Glass, paper, grease, boxes, etc… • Reuse • Reusable mugs & lunch boxes • Recycled napkins • Reduce • Motion sensor lights • Just in Time cooking • Waste reduction campaign

  37. Waste Reduction Campaign • With the help of students, we measured food waste during 3 meals in Fall 2008 • 1. measured waste • 2. measurement after educational campaign to encourage students to waste less food • 3. measurement on tray-less night

  38. 9/26 10/10

  39. 10/24 Trayless

  40. Beyond the 3 R’s It is good to minimize our ecological footprint, but we also need to focus on supporting green businesses Eco-friendly cleaning products Green Seal Certified Farmers Local, Sustainable & Organic Food- Farm to ISU

  41. Initiated in March 2007 by ISU Dining with support from local farmer organizations & sustainable agriculture researchers • Purpose: increase Local, Sustainable & Organic food purchases (35% in 2012) • Primarily local (10% in 2008) • Support farmers • Decrease food miles • Fresh foods

  42. Marketing Farm to ISU Foods to Students • Local when possible • In dining halls • Specific venues • Burrito Works pork • C-stores features • Local meals • Labor Day meal • Family Weekend brunch • Thanksgiving dinner

  43. Where does social justice come in? Fair Trade & Sustainable certified foods Fair Trade • Fair price is paid to growers • Coffee & bananas? Sustainable certified (Food Alliance) • Safe & fair working conditions • Canned beans & pears

  44. Future Plans • Composting food waste • Smaller serving plates (decrease food waste?) • Grease recycled for bio-fuel • Use biodegradable food containers

  45. Thank you!

  46. City of AmesArnold O. ChantlandResource Recover Plant

  47. What do they do there? They turn garbage in to energy!

  48. How do they do that? • Garbage from Story County is delivered to the plant • Dry/Wet refuse is mixed and pushed onto a conveyer which transports the garbage to the shredder room • Ferrous metal is attracted to the pick-up magnet, and pulled away from the waste stream • Abrasive grit and dust is removed and the garbage moves to the secondary shedder • The combustible pieces of refuse are blown into a coal utility boiler

  49. Facts about the Resource Recovery Plant • 65% of the waste received is turned into fuel • Saved over 80 acres of Iowa farmland from becoming a landfill • Over a 25-year period, processed enough refuse to fill Hilton Coliseum more than 453 times • Processed over a million tons of solid waste since they opened in 1975 • Recover enough metal to make 1,200 car bodies each year • Produce enough refuse-derived fuel to help heat more than 4,600 homes each year

  50. Questions?