Elements of fiction plot and setting
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Elements of Fiction: Plot and Setting. PLOT. The series of events in the narrative. Plot consists of exposition, conflict, rising action, climax, and resoution / denoument. Exposition - Introduces setting, character, and conflict. Conflict - External Man vs. man Man vs. society

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PLOT

  • The series of events in the narrative. Plot consists of exposition, conflict, rising action, climax, and resoution/denoument


  • Exposition-

    • Introduces setting, character, and conflict


  • Conflict-

    • External

      • Man vs. man

      • Man vs. society

      • Man vs. nature

      • Man vs. machine

    • Internal

      • Man vs. self


  • Complication- character takes some action to resolve conflict but meets with more problems or complications


  • Climax—key scene in the story when our emotional involvement is greatest. We learn what the outcome of the conflict is going to be



Setting
SETTING

  • Setting

    • Where and when the action takes place

    • May include the locale, the time, the weather, the time period, customs of the time.

    • Purpose:--

      • to provide background for action

      • to establish mood or atmosphere

      • to establish tone, or attitude, toward a subject

    • How created?

      • Diction

      • Imagery





  • Indirect characterization (often inference must be used) character is like or why he does something

    • Using a character’s speech to develop the character

      • First-person narration: characters tell their own story. They present facts but also tell what they think and feel. As they talk, they reveal personality traits.

      • Dialogue—is like listening in on a conversation. We can tell what they are like not only by what they say about themselves, but by how they respond to each other.

      • Dramatic monologue: a type of poem, a speaker addresses one or more silent listeners, often discussing a specific problem or situation. S the words come tumbling out, the speaker tells us a great deal about his or her life and values. We also learn about the speaker’s relationship with the listener.

      • Soliloquy-used in a play- delivered by a character alone onstage, addressing himself, revealing a character’s thought and feelings.


  • Appearance- character is like or why he does something

    • Clothes

    • Description

  • Private thoughts-

  • How other characters in the story feel about them

    • Maybe his customers love him but his family does not

  • Actions


Homework
HOMEWORK character is like or why he does something

  • Read “Thank You, Ma’am,” by Langston Hughes on page 87 of your textbook.


Point of view
Point of View character is like or why he does something

  • Point of View is the perspective from which the story is told

  • Points of view refers to the narrator of the story

    • First person point of view-the narrator is a character in the story; pronoun I is used.

    • Third person limited-the narrator is outside the story and knows and gives information about the thoughts of only one character.

    • Third person omniscient-the narrator is all-knowing; he knows and gives information about the thoughts of many characters

    • Third person objective-the narrator merely observes the characters and scenes; he sees what happens, but he is not inside anyone’s head


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