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Plagiarism & Misuse of Sources How to Avoid Them The University Writing Center. http://uwc.ucf.edu/. University Writing Center. UCF Orlando Locations: Mod 8 - 608 101 Colbourn (Summer 2012) UCF Library Phone: 407.823.2197 E-mail: UWC@mail.UCF.edu. Web: http://uwc.ucf.edu/

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plagiarism misuse of sources how to avoid them the university writing center

Plagiarism & Misuse of SourcesHow to Avoid ThemThe University Writing Center

http://uwc.ucf.edu/

university writing center
University Writing Center

UCF Orlando Locations:

Mod 8 - 608

101 Colbourn (Summer 2012)

UCF Library

Phone:

407.823.2197

E-mail:

UWC@mail.UCF.edu

Web:

http://uwc.ucf.edu/

Appointments:

2

integrating sources avoiding plagiarism
Integrating Sources & Avoiding Plagiarism

Writers need to understand current definitions of plagiarism, which have changed over time, and which differ from culture to culture.

From: Lunsford A. (2004). The everyday writer (3rd ed.). Boston, MA:

Bedford/St. Martin’s.

3

what is plagiarism
What is “Plagiarism”?

“In an instructional setting, plagiarism occurs when a writer deliberately uses someone else’s language, ideas, or other original (not common-knowledge) material without acknowledging its source.”

“This definition applies to texts published in print or online, to manuscripts, and to the work of other students.”

From: The Council of Writing Program Administrators

http://wpacouncil.org/node/9

4

what is not plagiarism
What is NOT Plagiarism?

“Most current discussions of plagiarism fail to distinguish between plagiarism and misuse of sources.”

“A student who attempts (even if clumsily) to identify and credit his or her source, but who misuses a specific citation format or incorrectly uses quotation marks or other forms of identifying material taken from other sources, has not plagiarized. Instead, the student has failed to cite and document sources appropriately.”

5

plagiarism is a cultural concept
Plagiarism Is a Cultural Concept

Many cultures do not recognize Western notions of plagiarism, which rest on the belief that language and ideas can be “owned” by writers.

In many countries other than the U.S., using the words and ideas of others without attribution is considered a sign of respect as well as an indication of knowledge.

From: Lunsford A. (2004). The everyday writer (3rd ed.). Boston, MA:

Bedford/St. Martin’s.

6

materials that require acknowledgement
Materials That Require Acknowledgement

Quotations, paraphrases, summaries

Facts not widely known or claims that are arguable

Help provided by others

7

materials that do not require acknowledgement
Materials That Do NOT RequireAcknowledgement

In academic writing in the U.S., you should credit all

materials except:

Common knowledge

Ideas available in a wide variety of sources

Your own findings from primary or field research

8

understand why to credit sources
Understand Why to Credit Sources

Show that you are a knowledgeable and credible researcher.

Demonstrate fairness—that you have considered multiple points of view.

Provide background for your research by placing it in the context of the work of others.

Help readers follow your thoughts and understand how your ideas relate to those of others.

Point readers where to go to find more information on your subject.

9

avoid misuse of sources
Avoid Misuse of Sources
  • Frequently, students unintentionally misuse sources when they attempt to paraphrase: To rephrase someone else’s ideas into your own words and sentence patterns.

From: The University of Arizona Libraries

http://www.library.arizona.edu/help/tutorials/plagiarism/index.html

paraphrasing
Paraphrasing

“The rise of industry, the growth of cities, and the expansion of the population were the three great developments of late nineteenth century American history. As new, larger, steam-powered factories became a feature of the American landscape in the East, they transformed farm hands into industrial laborers, and provided jobs for a rising tide of immigrants. With industry came urbanization, the growth of large cities (like Fall River, Massachusetts, where the Bordens lived), which became the centers of production as well as of commerce and trade.”

From Lizzie Borden: A Case Book of Family and Crime in the 1890s edited by Joyce G. Williams.

unacceptable paraphrase
Unacceptable Paraphrase

The increase of industry, the growth of cities, and the explosion of the population were three large factors of nineteenth century America. As steam-driven companies became more visible in the eastern part of the country, they changed farm hands into factory workers and provided jobs for the large wave of immigrants. With industry came the growth of large cities like Fall River where the Bordens lived, which turned into centers of commerce and trade as well as production.

an unacceptable paraphrase is too close to the original
An Unacceptable Paraphrase Is Too Close to the Original

The increase of industry, the growth of cities, and the explosion of the population were three large factors of nineteenth century America. As steam-driven companies became more visible in the eastern part of the country, they changed farm hands into factory workers and provided jobs for the large wave of immigrants. With industry came the growth of large cities like Fall River where the Bordens lived, which turned into centers of commerce and tradeas well as production.

acceptable paraphrase
Acceptable Paraphrase

According to Williams (1980), Fall River, where the Borden family lived, was typical of northeastern industrial cities of the nineteenth century. Steam-powered production had shifted labor from agriculture to manufacturing, and as immigrants arrived in the U.S., they found work in these new factories. As a result, populations grew, and large urban areas arose. Fall River was one of these manufacturing and commercial centers.

APA Reference:

Williams, J. G. (Ed.). (1980). Lizzie Borden: A case book of family and crime in the 1890s. Bloomington, IN: TIS Publications.

what makes a good paraphrase
What Makes a Good Paraphrase?

Uses your own words and sentence patterns.

Demonstrates your inferential thought processes.

Rather than being merely a faithful reproduction of the ideas in source text, an effective paraphrase is one that expresses your perspective.

Includes a citation.

acceptable paraphrase with quotation
Acceptable Paraphrase with Quotation

According to Williams (1980), Fall River, where the Borden family lived, was typical of northeastern industrial cities of the nineteenth century. As steam-powered production shifted labor from agriculture to manufacturing, the demand for workers "transformed farm hands into factory workers," and created jobs for immigrants. In turn, growing populations increased the size of urban areas. Fall River was one of these manufacturing hubs that were also "centers of commerce and trade" (p. 200).

Williams, J. G. (Ed.). (1980). Lizzie Borden: A case book of family and crime in the 1890s. Bloomington, IN: TIS Publications.

acceptable paraphrase with quotation1
Acceptable Paraphrase with Quotation

Fall River, where the Borden family lived, was typical of northeastern industrial cities of the nineteenth century. As steam-powered production shifted labor from agriculture to manufacturing, the demand for workers "transformed farm hands into factory workers," and created jobs for immigrants. In turn, growing populations increased the size of urban areas. Fall River was one of these manufacturing hubs that were also "centers of commerce and trade" (Williams, 1980, p. 200).

Williams, J. G. (Ed.). (1980). Lizzie Borden: A case book of family and crime in the 1890s. Bloomington, IN: TIS Publications.

paraphrasing accurately
Paraphrasing Accurately

Include all main points, in the order of the original.

State the author’s meaning in your own words and sentence structures.

If you use language from the original, enclose in quotation marks.

Include an in-text citation.

Provide a complete citation in your References.

apa is one of many citation styles
APA is One of Many Citation Styles
  • MLA – Modern Language Association (humanities)
  • APA – American Psychological Association

(social sciences, business)

  • CMS – Chicago Manual of Style (history)
  • CSE – Council of Science Editors (sciences)
  • IEEE – Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (engineering)
print based apa resources
Print-based APA Resources

Copies of the APA style manual are available in the Writing Center and the UCF Library.

For more information: http://guides.ucf.edu/APA/

print based apa resources1
Print-based APA Resources
  • Start with the table of contents.
  • Use the index.
  • Note the inclusion of a sample paper.
web based apa resources
Web-based APA Resources

APA Guidelines:

http://www.apastyle.org/apa-style-help.aspx

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Sample Paper:

http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/

key points
Key Points

Citation machines are helpful, but can be inaccurate.

As you move from one field to another, find out the preferred citation style and practice it.

Citing sources is not about memorizing rules; it is about learning to use available resources to help you give credit to other writers for their words and ideas.

university writing center1
University Writing Center

UCF Orlando Locations:

Mod 8 - 608

101 Colbourn (Summer 2012)

UCF Library

Phone:

407.823.2197

E-mail:

UWC@mail.UCF.edu

Web:

http://uwc.ucf.edu/

Appointments:

24