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Overview of Dedicated Funding Streams . Presented: January 17, 2007. Funding from Lotteries, Casinos, or other Gaming. Red = state appropriates more than 15 percent of higher ed budget from gaming revenue Green = state appropriates less than 15 percent of higher ed budget from gaming revenue.

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overview of dedicated funding streams

Overview of Dedicated Funding Streams

Presented: January 17, 2007

funding from lotteries casinos or other gaming
Funding from Lotteries, Casinos, or other Gaming

Red = state appropriates more than 15 percent of higher ed budget from gaming revenue

Green = state appropriates less than 15 percent of higher ed budget from gaming revenue

  • Gaming revenues are primarily used to support both merit and need-based financial aid
  • Source: State Higher Education Executive Officers, State Higher Education Finance FY 2005
non appropriated sources
Non-Appropriated Sources
  • Money set aside for higher education from receipt of lease income or oil/mineral extraction fees.
  • Source: State Higher Education Executive Officers, State Higher Education Finance FY 2005
local tax appropriations
Local Tax Appropriations

Blue = state appropriates more than 10 percent of higher ed budget from local taxes.

Green = state appropriates less than 10 percent of higher ed budget from local taxes.

Source: State Higher Education Executive Officers, State Higher Education Finance FY 2005

how are lottery monies used
How are lottery monies used?
  • Most states have created merit or need-based scholarship programs, including:
    • New Mexico
      • Student Success Scholarships – New Mexico residents that meet criteria
    • Oklahoma
      • Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program – need-based program that students enter in the 8th grade to ensure they are prepared for college.
    • South Carolina
      • HOPE scholarship – merit based scholarships.
    • West Virginia
      • PROMISE program -- merit based scholarships.
  • Several states use lottery revenues to support operations, including:
    • Florida
    • Oklahoma
    • South Carolina
georgia hope scholarship
Georgia – HOPE Scholarship
  • Merit-based program funded entirely from lottery revenues.
  • Georgia State Higher Ed. Budget:
    • $2.5 billion state & local appropriations
    • $502 million or 20.5% from lottery revenue
  • 99% of in-state freshman enrolled at the University of Georgia last Fall received the award.
    • Average full-time resident tuition & fees: $2,482/semester
    • HOPE pays 100% of tuition and fees plus $150 for books.
other hope scholarship programs
Other “HOPE” Scholarship Programs
  • 16 states have similar programs to Georgia’s HOPE program
  • Only three do not allow private institutions to participate:
    • Alaska
    • Massachusetts; and
    • New Mexico
lottery funding how has it impacted higher education
Lottery Funding – How has it impacted higher education?

General Finding

  • Lottery funding often supplants existing state appropriations for education, making the percentage of state budgets allocated for education lower post-lottery.
  • Non-lottery states on average allocate a smaller percentage of their state budgets to education.

Examples

  • In Ohio, the last time the lottery expanded, the state allocated $1.60 less in its general fund in aid to schools for every $1.00 in profits provided from the lottery.
  • In Vermont, after the state began using gaming revenues to support education, the percentage of general funds allocated dropped from 46% in 1990 to 39% in 1994.

Source: North Carolina Lottery for Education: What are the Odds our Schools would win?; Charlotte Advocates for Education, May 2003

non appropriated sources higher education examples
Non-appropriated sources – Higher Education Examples

WYOMING – new endowment approved by voters Nov. 2006

  • $500 million endowment created for academic scholarships and endowed chairs using state mineral taxes.
  • Wyoming high school graduates will receive a scholarship equal to tuition and fees at the University of Wyoming (UW) or any state community college.
  • Authorizes $105 million for endowed chairs and faculty for research and instruction at UW and the state's community colleges.
  • University of Wyoming will receive two-thirds of the funding, while the community colleges will receive one-third.
local tax appropriations1
Local Tax Appropriations

Colorado

  • Support Local District Junior Colleges (LDJC)
  • Local district junior colleges have special property tax districts that contribute to the support of their their operations.
  • Students from the special property tax districts pay discounted tuition rates.
  • Historically the following LDJC’s were in operation:
    • Aims Community College
    • Arapahoe Community College
    • Colorado Mountain College
    • Grand Junction Junior College
    • Lamar Junior College
    • Morgan County Community College
    • Northwestern Community College
    • Otera Junior College
    • Pueblo Junior College
    • Sterling Junior College
    • Trinidad Junior College
  • Today all but two are no longer supported by their local districts and funded entirely from the state
    • Colorado Mountain College
    • Aims Community college
colorado local district junior colleges
Colorado Local District Junior Colleges

Aims Community College

Steamboat CMC

Vail – Eagle Valley CMC

Glenwood Springs CMC

Dillon CMC

Breckenridge CMC

Spring Valley CMC

Rifle CMC

Leadville CMC

Carbondale CMC

Buena Vista CMC

Salida CMC

tuition at local district junior colleges
Tuition at Local District Junior Colleges
  • Aims Community College
    • In-District-Tuition: $50/credit hour
    • Out-of-District Tuition: $75/credit hour
    • Out-of-State: $300/credit hour
  • Colorado Mountain College
    • In-District Tuition: $43/credit hour
    • Out-of-District Tuition: $72/credit hour
    • Out-of-State Tuition: $231/credit hour