slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Menu PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Menu

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 52

Menu - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 185 Views
  • Uploaded on

Menu. This curricula is intended to provide information to assist faculty in working successfully with a diverse student body. . Introduction. Disability, Multiculturalism and Diversity. Multiculturalism. C u l t u r a l D iv e rsi t y. Colored handprints. Colored handprints.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Menu' - shamara


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
Menu

This curricula is intended to provide information to assist faculty in working successfully with a diverse student body.

Introduction

Disability, Multiculturalism and Diversity

Multiculturalism

Cultural Diversity

Colored handprints

Colored handprints

Theoretical Perspectives About Disability

Postsecondary Education

References

introduction
Introduction

While there is increasing attention at many universities to cultural diversity in general, disability is often overlooked.

Many students with disabilities have multiple cultural identities. The combination of disability and multiple cultural identities can impact success in postsecondary education.

A smiling globe sitting on a wheelchair

Diversity in postsecondary education has expanded over the past two decades creating a need for colleges and universities to reassess traditional instructional strategies to better meet the needs of all students.

A girl with Down syndrome working on a computer

(Newby, 2005; Scott, McGuire, & Shaw, 2003). As reported in the Chronicle of Higher Education (2008).

goals
Goals

To discuss disability culture.

To explore the interconnection between cultural diversity and disability.

To provide examples of multicultural perspectives.

To offer insight for facilitating postsecondary success for students from diverse backgrounds both with and without disabilities.

Goals

To share information about cultural diversity, multiculturalism, and disability in postsecondary education.

To provide tools and exercises for exploring cultural perspectives, ideas and viewpoints.

objectives
Objectives

To discover how culture is key to the concepts of multiculturalism and diversity.

To recognize how disability is a part of cultural diversity.

Objectives

To understand culture and cultural components.

To understand multiculturalism as it relates to students with disabilities in postsecondary education.

evaluation
Evaluation

You can evaluate this module by clicking on the following link Click Here

A figure holding a sheet

fast facts
Fast Facts

Statistics About Postsecondary Participation

Many students with disabilities have multiple cultural identities.

Students of minority status

35.35%

Students reporting a disability

The combination of disability and multiple cultural identities can impact success in postsecondary education.

11.3%

Students attending part-time

45.3%

Students aged 25 to 34

21.5%

Students over the age of 34

18.4%

Graphic of a colored pie chart.

The Chronicle of Higher Education. (2008). Almanac, 2008-9, 1, 3-35

multicultural awareness quiz
Multicultural-Awareness Quiz

Take this quiz to test yourself on your awareness of multiculturalism.

http://portal.coe.hawaii.edu/survey.php?survey=775

Click Here

Graphic of a man looking at a test

slide8
Menu

This curricula is intended to provide information to assist faculty in working successfully with a diverse student body.

Disability, Multiculturalism and Diversity

Introduction

Multiculturalism

Cultural Diversity

Colored handprints

Colored handprints

Theoretical Perspectives About Disability

Postsecondary Education

References

what is multiculturalism
What is Multiculturalism?

To share different components, functions and purposes of culture

To introduce the concept of

cultural diversity and multiculturalism

To understand diverse cultural dynamics

To learn how multiple cultural identities create multiculturalism 

Learning

Objectives

Goals

definitions
Definitions

Diversity

Multiculturalism

“The fact or quality of being diverse.” http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/diversity

More than one identity based on different cultural groups of which one may be a member.

Values

Systems

"A person's principles or standards of behavior; one's judgment of what is important in life.”

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/value

"A system of knowledge, of standards for perceiving, believing, evaluating and acting  that serve to relate human communities to their environmental settings (Allaire and Firsirotu 1984).”

Retrieved from National Defense University

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/ndu/strat-ldr-dm/pt4ch16.html

CulturalDiversity

“The coexistence of different ethnic, gender, racial, [disability] and socioeconomic groups within one social unit.”

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Cultural+Diversity

definitions11
Definitions

Integrated Patterns

Normative Codes

“Ways of behaving such as food practices, religious practices, child-rearing practices”

Sotnik, P., & Jezewski, M. A. (2005). Culture and Disability Services. In J. H. Stone (Ed.), Culture and disability: Providing culturally competent services (p. 21). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

“Culture as an integrated pattern of human behavior that includes thoughts, communications, languages, practices, beliefs, values, customs, courtesies, rituals, manners of interacting and roles, relationships and expected behaviors of a racial, ethnic, religious or social group; and the ability to transmit the above to succeeding generations.”

Goode, T., Sockalingam, S., Bronheim, S., Brown, M., and Jones, W. (2000). A planner's guide: Infusing principles, content and themes related to cultural and linguistic competence into meetings and conferences. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence. Retrieved March 14, 2011, from http://www.nclrc.org/essentials/culture/cuindex.htm

Scripts

“Behavioral scripts are a sequence of expected behaviors for a given setting” (such as in business, in a classroom, or in a restaurant).

Behavioral scripts. In Wikipedia. Retrieved March14,2011. from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_script

what is multiple oppression
What Is Multiple Oppression?

A person can feel racially or culturally oppressed in society, an individual can feel oppressed by how they are treated because of a disability.

Multicultural individuals with disabilities may feel oppressed by social views of their culture and of their disability. Disability and cultural displacement can be oppressive forces.

Picture of a man using a wheelchair next to a mud hut in a rural area

understanding your own cultural perspective
Understanding Your Own Cultural Perspective

The cultural values one holds and the way an individual sees themselves affects how they develop their cultural identity.

Western societies tend to view the world from a more individualistic perspective, while Eastern societies view the world from a more collectivistic perspective.

However, most societies do not completely fit the Eastern or Western identity paradigms, and most cultures are a complex mix of collectivistic and individualistic values.

To understand how cultural characteristics impact others a person must understand their own cultural perspective.

This picture is divided in half. The left shows a figure by himself and the other half shows six figures holding each other hands

multicultural perspectives
Multicultural Perspectives

Continuum of Values

Collectivistic (Eastern)

Individualistic (Western)

Interdependence

Independence

Obligation to others

Individual Rights

Rely on groups

Self-sufficiency

Adhere to traditional values

True to own values and beliefs

Maintain traditional practices

Continually improve practices

Leake. (2009, January). Overview of Western vs. Non-Western Conceptions. A lecture at DIS 681. University of Hawaii at Manoa. Honolulu, HI

multicultural perspectives15
Multicultural Perspectives

Continuum of Values Cont.

Collectivistic (Eastern)

Individualistic (Western)

Fulfill roles within groups

Pursue individual goals/interests

Group achievement

Individual achievement

Competition between groups

Competition between individuals

Group/hierarchical decision making

Self determination/individual choice

Shame/guilt due to failing group

Shame/guilt due to individual failure

Leake. (2009, January). Overview of Western vs. Non-Western Conceptions. A lecture at DIS 681. University of Hawaii at Manoa. Honolulu, HI

example
Example

Cultural Identity Bubble Map

Example

People have many identities or “distinguishing characteristics” such as a “person with a disability, ” “Native Hawaiian,” or “gay/ lesbian.” Some people may identify with one characteristic more than another.

Mother/ Daughter/ Sister

The “Cultural Identity

Bubble Map Example” is an example of an Identity Map, followed by a Blank Cultural Map Template for you to create your own Cultural Identity Bubble Map.

Disabled/Student/ Widow

Black/ America/ Creole/

Southern

Melissa Sweet

The map places the person, you in this case, in the bubble at the center, with bubbles listing various aspects of your identity radiating to the center. Go to next page for activity.

Business Owner/ Christian/ Spiritual

creating your own cultural identity bubble map
Creating Your Own Cultural Identity Bubble Map

Here is a template for you to create your own Cultural Identity Bubble Map.

You are in

the bubble at the center, with bubbles listing various aspects of your identity radiating to the center.

YOU

Children from different cultures wearing different colors

discussion 1
Discussion 1

1. What are three components of Culture I learned?

2. What did I learn about myself from completing the Bubble Map?

3. What other cultures am I aware of that haven’t been mentioned yet?

4. Do I consider myself to be Multicultural?

Why or why not?

5. Reflecting on the table ‘Continuum of Values,’

would I consider myself more individualistic or

collectivist? How can I explain this?

Girl sitting and thinking with her head in her hand.

slide19
Menu

This curricula is intended to provide information to assist faculty in working successfully with a diverse student body.

Disability, Multiculturalism and Diversity

Introduction

Multiculturalism

Cultural Diversity

Colored handprints

Colored handprints

Theoretical Perspectives About Disability

Postsecondary Education

References

disability multiculturalism and diversity
Disability, Multiculturalism, and Diversity

“The multicultural perspective seeks to provide a conceptual framework that recognizes the complex diversity of a plural society while, at the same time, suggesting bridges of shared concern that bind culturally different persons to one another.” (Pedersen, 1991, p. 7)

To explore different ways people acquire identity.

To discuss how disability plays a role in identity construction.

To see how different agents transmit culture and sources of cultural identity.

To understand how disability fits into multiculturalism and diversity.

Objectives

Goals

20

did you ever consider the fact
Did You Ever Consider the Fact?

People may identify with multiple cultures. Characteristics identified with a culture, such as food, language, or religion; often contribute to a person’s identity. Disability may be one component of a person’s cultural identity.

Fact 1

Disability often unites individuals into a cultural group even though members of the group may not share similar racial or linguistic backgrounds. Labeling oneself as disabled, or being labeled disabled can be part of identity along with other identifiable characteristics like ethnic or religious identity.

Fact 2

facts continued
Facts: Continued…

When disability is perceived as part of cultural identity it can become a cultural component, which expands diversity and becomes a part of multiculturalism.

Fact 3

Disability is likely not to be someone’s sole identity, but it might be a stronger cultural identity than other individual cultural components. At the same time, because many cultures devalue disability, other individuals may not identify having a disability as part of their overall identity.

Fact 4

socializing agents
Socializing Agents

“Socializing agents,” may strongly influence individual identity. For some people, for instance, religion plays the biggest role, for others their position within the family may have a huge impact. Since we are all different, we all respond differently to various socializing agents.

Family

School

Church

Technology

The

Individual

Community

Workplace

Print Media

Neighborhood

The Arts

Peer Group

ElectronicMedia

Sports

A circle with the individual at the center and socializing agents, such as family, church, sports radiating out.

Cushner, McClelland, & Safford (1996), Human Diversity in Education: An Integrative Approach, p. 66

sources of cultural identity
Sources of Cultural Identity

Race

Ability/

Disability

Ethnicity/

Nationality

Language

Social Class

The Individual

Social Status

Sex/

Gender

Health

Religion

Age

Sexuality

Geographic

Region

Multiple circles that indicate twelve sources of cultural identity

Cushner, McClelland, & Safford (1996), Human Diversity in Education: An Integrative Approach, p. 75.

discussion 2
Discussion 2
  • Name three socializing agents that transmit culture.
  • What are three sources of your cultural identity. Which of the three has the most influence on your individual identity?
  • What is your personal definition of disability?
  • How was it developed?
  • Do you believe ability/ disability is a part of
  • your identity? Why or why not?

Girl sitting and thinking with her head in her hand.

slide26
Menu

This curricula is intended to provide information to assist faculty in working successfully with a diverse student body.

Disability, Multiculturalism and Diversity

Introduction

Multiculturalism

Cultural Diversity

Colored handprints

Colored handprints

Theoretical Perspectives About Disability

Postsecondary Education

References

theoretical perspectives about disability
Theoretical Perspectives About Disability

Considering cultural diversity and multiculturalism includes multiple ways of looking at disabilities. Various cultures, religions, and generations view disabilities in unique ways. Several models that have been used to describe people with disabilities and their place in society are presented in this section.

To examine three of the different theories of disability.

To consider that there are different ways of approaching disability.

To understand differences in the ways that people look at disability and its impact on disability policy and practice.

To understand differences in the ways that people with disabilities look at themselves and its impact on policy and practice.

Objectives

Goals

three models that impact how people view disability
Three Models That Impact How People View Disability

Social

Disability Culture &Pride

Medical

Models

the medical model
The Medical Model

Three Models That Impact How People View Disability

Social

Social

Disability Culture &Pride

Medical

Models

medical
Medical

Models

Models

The individual is the Problem

A child holding his head in his hands

Disability expertise is primarily controlled through the medical profession…

A doctor in her lab coat with the stethoscope around her

shoulder

…and professionals working in specialized fields.

Two Professionals writing notes

medical31
Medical

Models

The medical model has served the purpose of identifying and assisting persons with disabilities, and has created a network of policies and services that protect and support people with disabilities.

Models

The Medical Model’s focus on a cure is seen by many people with disabilities as harmful because it ignores the social, physical, educational, and employment barriers faced on a daily basis by most people with disabilities.

A picture of a doctor

with a stethoscope

As individuals with disabilities have rebelled against the medical model, other models have been developed, often by individuals with disabilities.

A picture of a

wheelchair racer

the social model
The Social Model

Three Models That Impact How People View Disability

Social

Disability Culture &Pride

Medical

Models

Models

social
Social

Models

Models

Two professionals shaking hands

The Social Model of disability suggests that society and the environment contribute to and define disability.

Different technology devices connected to the globe

A person who is blind using Braille.

Two people talking to each other

A picture of stairs

social34
Social

Models

Models

Many buildings are not accessible to people who use wheelchairs. Thus it is poor building design, and not the individual who uses a wheelchair, that disables wheelchair-users.

The Social model presumes that since the “problem” of disability lies with society and the environment, so society and the environment must change to accommodate the needs of individuals with disabilities.

A graphic of stairs

In schools, many print texts are not accessible to those with visual or learning disabilities, even though alternative formats to print such as Braille and auditory recordings are readily available.

Eye glasses on top of pile of old books

disability culture pride model
Disability Culture & Pride Model

Three Models That Impact How People View Disability

Social

Social

Disability Culture &Pride

Medical

Models

disability culture pride
Disability Culture & Pride

Models

Models

Overview

In response to the political, cultural and historical experiences that have led to

discrimination against people with disabilities, disability rights advocates in the late twentieth century developed the Disability Culture & Pride Model. This model emphasizes pride and a positive disability identity.

Dance performance with three women raising their hands and radiating out from a woman using a wheelchair.

disability culture pride37
Disability Culture & Pride

Models

Models

What Is Disability Culture?

“People with disabilities have forged a group identity. We share a common history of oppression and a common bond of resilience. We generate art, music, literature, and other expressions of our lives and our culture, infused from our experience of disability. Most importantly, we are proud of ourselves as people with disabilities. We claim our disabilities with pride as part of our identity. We are who we are: we are people with disabilities.”

Dance performance where a man using a wheelchair is holding a woman in a gymnastics movement.

Brown, S. E. (2003). Movie stars and sensuous scars: Essays on the journey from disability shame to disability pride. pp. 80-81. Lincoln, NE: iUniverse, Inc.

discussion 3
Discussion 3
  • Which of these models of Disability is most practical to you? Which model is most appealing?
  • Which of these models of Disability do you think is most widely used? Why?
  • Is there another model you would
  • add? If so, what would it be and how would you explain it?

Girl sitting and thinking with her head in her hand.

slide39
Menu

This curricula is intended to provide information to assist faculty in working successfully with a diverse student body.

Disability, Multiculturalism and Diversity

Introduction

Multiculturalism

Cultural Diversity

Colored handprints

Colored handprints

Theoretical Perspectives About Disability

Postsecondary Education

References

students with disabilities in postsecondary education
Students with Disabilities in Postsecondary Education

To discuss postsecondary education and students with disabilities.

To learn more about disability rights laws such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

To learn more about barriers and supports in the university system for students with disabilities.

To explore the significance of colleges and universities on the lives of students with disabilities.

Goals

Objectives

common questions about postsecondary students with disabilities
Common Questions About Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

1. How are accommodations in college different from the services provided to students with disabilities in high school?

The law that governs access to primary and secondary education for children with disabilities, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (formerly the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act or IDEA, which is still used to describe this Act) requires that educational institutions identify students with disabilities and provide them with specific services and modifications.

This differs from the civil rights laws that govern access to postsecondary education for adults with disabilities, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which require students to self-identify as having a disability and negotiate their individual accommodations.

common questions about postsecondary students with disabilities42
Common Questions About Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

2. Who is responsible for identifying whether or not a student has a disability?

In order to receive supports and accommodations in the postsecondary classroom, a student with a disability has to become a strong self-advocate who must first choose whether they want to disclose their disability. The process of identification and accommodation negotiation can be extremely difficult and intimidating, especially if a student does not have prior experience advocating for themselves or is not aware of the postsecondary support provision process.

common questions about postsecondary students with disabilities43
Common Questions About Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

3. Why would a student choose not to disclose their disability?

Many college students choose not to disclose their disability or ask for accommodations because they want to try and “make it own their own” or because they fear that disclosure of a disability will cause faculty to view them as incompetent.

4. Who can disclose a student’s disability?

Despite the difficulty that self-disclosure sometimes presents, neither representatives of the postsecondary institution nor faculty members can legally ask a student if they have a disability. This is considered confidential information that is treated with the same caution as medical information.   

common questions about postsecondary students with disabilities44
Common Questions About Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

5. What is a “hidden disability”?

A hidden or invisible disability is one that typically cannot be seen by the casual observer, such as Learning Disabilities (LD), emotional and psychiatric disabilities, or Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD).

Some examples of disabilities that are often hidden or invisible are below:

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Diabetes

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Epilepsy

Multiple Chemical Sensitivities/Environmental Illness

AIDS

Hypertension

Learning Disabilities

Lupus

Cancer

Psychiatric Disability

Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD)

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

common questions about postsecondary students with disabilities45
Common Questions About Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

6. What is a “ documented disability”?

Students attending postsecondary institutions who seek services from a Disability Student Services office must provide some kind of proof of their disability. This is referred to as “documenting your disability.” Documentation often requires the student to seek verification from a medical doctor or other professional at their own expense.

A stethoscope on a medical report

discussion 4
Discussion4
  • What are the principle differences between IDEA and ADA?
  • Is it legal or appropriate to ask a student about their disability?
  • What can you do to assist a student with a disability to succeed? Would you do anything differently for a multicultural student with a disability?

Girl sitting and thinking with her head in her hand.

evaluation47
Evaluation

You can evaluate this module by clicking on the following link Click Here

A figure holding a sheet

slide48
Menu

This curricula is intended to provide information to assist faculty in working successfully with a diverse student body.

Disability, Multiculturalism and Diversity

Introduction

Multiculturalism

Cultural Diversity

Colored handprints

Colored handprints

Theoretical Perspectives About Disability

Postsecondary Education

References

references
References
  • Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended. Retrieved from http://www.ada.gov/pubs/adastatute08.htm
  • Behavioral scripts (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved March14,2011. from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_script
  • Brown, S. E. (2003). Movie stars and sensuous scars: Essays on the journey from disability shame to disability pride. Lincoln, NE: iUniverse, Inc.
  • Center on Disability Studies. (2007-2008) Hidden disabilities. Retrieved from http://www.ist.hawaii.edu/training/hiddendisabilities/
  • Cushner, K., McClelland, A., and Safford, P. (1996). Human diversity in education: An integrative approach. New York: McGraw-Hill
references50
References
  • Goode, T., Sockalingam, S., Bronheim, S., Brown, M., and Jones, W. (2000). A planner's guide: Infusing principles, content and themes related to cultural and linguistic competence into meetings and conferences. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence. Retrieved from http://www.nclrc.org/essentials/culture/cuindex.htm
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. Public Law 108-446. Retrieved from
      • http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgibin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=108_cong_public_laws&docid=f:publ446.108
  • Leake, D. (2009, January). Overview of Western vs. Non-Western Conceptions. A lecture at DIS 681. University of Hawaii at Manoa. Honolulu. HI
  • Newby, W. (2005). Voices from the classroom. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, 120, 598-602.
references51
References
  • Pedersen, D. B. (1991). Multiculturalism as a generic approach to counseling. Journal ofCounseling and Development, 70, 6-11.
  • Scott, S., McGuire, J., & Shaw, S. (2003). Universal design for instruction: A new paradigm for adult instruction in postsecondary education. Remedial and Special Education, 24, 369-379.
  • Stonik, P. and Jezewski, M. (2005). Culture and the disability services. In J. Stone (Ed), Culture and disability : providing culturally competent services (p.21). California: SAGE
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education. (2008). Almanac, 2008-9, 1, 3-35.
  • Values. (2011). Oxford Dictionaries. Retrieved March 14, 2011, from  http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/value
slide52

For More Information, Contact:

Project Coordinators

Steven E. Brown, Ph.D.

sebrown@hawaii.edu

Megan Conway, Ph.D.

mconway@hawaii.edu

Project Coordinators

Teaching all Students, Reaching all Learners

Website address: www.ist.hawaii.edu

A picture of Dr. Steven Brown

A picture of Dr. Megan Conway

End