management of infection prevention and control n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Management of infection prevention and control PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Management of infection prevention and control

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 20

Management of infection prevention and control - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 279 Views
  • Uploaded on

Management of infection prevention and control. Antoinette Barton-Gooden 2013. Objectives. Discuss the aims of infection control Identify the levels of responsibility for infection prevention and control Discuss the advantages of infection control

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Management of infection prevention and control' - senona


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
objectives
Objectives
  • Discuss the aims of infection control
  • Identify the levels of responsibility for infection prevention and control
  • Discuss the advantages of infection control
  • Explain the regulatory framework at the national and organizational levels.
  • Identify components of infection prevention & control.
  • Discuss organizational control measures to protect both patients and healthcare workers.
introduction
Introduction
  • Is infection control necessary?
  • http://rjrnewsonline.com/local/prisoners-at-kingston-central-police-lockup-diagnosed-with-tubercolosis
aim of infection control
Aim of infection control
  • To reduce infection/health care associated infections (HCAIs)/nosocomial infection (Hospital acquired).
  • These infections increase patients’ suffering and can prolong the length of hospital stay.
  • Many of these infected patients suffer permanent disability and a significant number die.
  • Increasing numbers of infections are being caused by microbes resistant to conventional treatments. (WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multi-professional Edition, p.210)
hcais
HCAIs
  • WHO defines a health care-associated (also called hospital acquired) infection as an infection acquired in hospital by a patient who was admitted for a reason other than that infection and/or an infection
  • Occurring in a patient in a hospital or other health-care facility in whom the infection was not present or incubating at the time of admission.
  • This includes infections that are acquired in the hospital, but appear only after discharge, as well as occupational infections among health-care facility staff. (WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multi-professional Edition, p.210)
it is not all about you
It is not all about you!
  • Infection control is everyone’s business.
regulatory process
Regulatory process
  • Jamaica: Ministry of Health developed policies about infection control (2000) and immunization policy to guide health care facilities and organizations.
    • Organizations eg. Hospital, health centres, schools, workplaces.
  • Professional associations: training for their stakeholders eg. Nurses, Doctors, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).
  • Quality assurance framework within various institutions.
  • Centre for Disease Control (USA) have guided the development of policies.
scenario
Scenario
  • The infection control practitioner educated the patient and staff about the transmission route Clostridium difficile when a case was reported on the ward.
  • While caring for the client, the nurses were observed to be wearing mask, hair cap, gown, gloves and hurriedly performed each task without talking.
  • What devices are necessary to ensure infection control?
infection prevention control committee
Infection prevention & control committee
  • Multidisciplinary membership: Microbiologist, dietary, housekeeping, laundry, medical, nursing, pharmacy, Central Sterilization and Supplies Department, Public health nurses (PHNs)and inspectors
infection control functions
Infection control functions
  • Universal precautions
  • Development of isolation procedures
  • Education of all staff
  • Monitoring and surveillance
  • Reporting as an element of quality assurance to the CEO, SMO, Medical Officer of Health and Nursing Directors.
  • Continuous quality improvement by liaising with all departments to identify problems and solutions to enhance patient care.
components of infection prevention control
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Isolation: Creation of a barrier, mechanical or spatial to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases to or from a patient.
    • Adequate personnel assigned to area
    • Appropriate equipment and supplies
    • Schedule daily routine cleaning and maintenance
    • Education of HCW, patients and family regarding the illness and precautionary measures to be observed.
components of infection prevention control1
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Standard precaution
    • Hand washing before, after patient contact , immediately after any contact with body fluid, after covering a sneeze, picking the nares, using the toilet, after removing gloves, touching contaminated objects, before preparing food//handling food, when hands are dirty etc.
    • Wear PPE when there is a risk of splashing eg. Masks, goggles, aprons, closed shoes, gloves, caps
components of infection prevention control2
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Transmission based precautions
    • Droplet
    • Fecal
    • blood
components of infection prevention control3
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Disinfection & Sterilization: Sterilization is a procedure which achieves complete destruction of all microorganisms including bacteria spores.
  • Disinfection: A procedure which removes or kills most, but not all viable microorganisms.
  • Antiseptic: A non toxic ‘disinfectant’ used on the skin or living tissues. Usually used at a lower dilution; should not be used to disinfect instruments or the environment.
components of infection prevention control4
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Soiled instruments and surfaces soiled with body fluid should be disinfected for at least 5 minutes with a fresh 1:10 dilution of a 5% bleach solution or 1:6 dilution of 3% bleach solution that yields a 0.5% solution or other effective disinfectant.
  • Heavy soiled instruments should be disinfected for 5 minutes with a 1:5 dilution of 5% bleach solution or a 1:3% bleach solution that yields a 1% solution.
components of infection prevention control5
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Housekeeping
    • Frequent wiping of floor with bleach
    • Blood spillage wiped immediately with bleach
components of infection prevention control6
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Health care waste management
    • All soiled linen and clothing must be placed in a clear plastic bag and labelled appropriately before being sent to the laundry.
    • All body waste must be flushed in toilet
    • All other infectious waste must be placed in red or yellow bags.
    • Bags should be tied securely and removed for incineration.
    • Puncture resistant container for sharps
components of infection prevention control7
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Risk management: Infection control team
    • Surveillance
    • Outbreak investigations
    • Communicable disease reporting
    • Education
    • Antibiotic utilization and audit
    • Committee and consultant involvement
    • Regulatory compliance (Hoffmann, 2009)
components of infection prevention control8
Components of infection prevention & control
  • Please read classification of wastes and waste management segregation and packaging (Ministry of Health (2000): Health Facilities Infection Control Policies and Procedures Manual).
bibliography
Bibliography
  • Hoffmann, K.(2009). Developing an infection control program. http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/
  • Ministry of Health (2000): Health Facilities Infection Control Policies and Procedures Manual).
  • University Hospital of the West Indies (2007): Infection Control Policy and Procedures Manual.
  • WHO (2011) Patient Safety Curriculum Guide: Multi-professional Edition.
  • Image:http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.metrolic.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/11_bg.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.lookfordiagnosis.com/mesh_info.php?term=Patient+Isolation&lang=1&h=326&w=500&sz=41&tbnid=Rb8pqkM27EXCZM&tbnh=181&tbnw=278&zoom=1&usg=__8htB0NO4WDgIi3gzBUvItGL2K-c=