aim of community of inquiry n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Aim of Community of Inquiry PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Aim of Community of Inquiry

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 15

Aim of Community of Inquiry - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 83 Views
  • Uploaded on

Aim of Community of Inquiry. Help children to make better judgments. What is a Good Judgment?. Practical Wisdom Synthetic rather than Analytic Capacity for integrating vast and changing data See data as elements in a single patterns See their implications and possibilities for the future

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Aim of Community of Inquiry' - semah


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
aim of community of inquiry

Aim of Community of Inquiry

Help children to make better judgments.

what is a good judgment
What is a Good Judgment?
  • Practical Wisdom
  • Synthetic rather than Analytic
  • Capacity for integrating vast and changing data
  • See data as elements in a single patterns
  • See their implications and possibilities for the future
  • Highly developed relational consciousness
what is a good judgment1
What is a good Judgment?
  • Sensitivity to Contours and Texture of a situation
  • Something empirical and aesthetic (working with part-whole relationships)
  • A feel for the relevant or salient data
what is a good judgment2
What is a good Judgment?
  • Educable
  • What fits with what
  • What springs from what
  • What leads to what
  • Conscious of how things vary to different observers
  • What the results are likely to be
what is a good judgment3
What is a Good Judgment?
  • Qualitative rather than quantitative
  • Capacity to focus on specifics of a situation as well as general
  • Species of direct acquaintance like a parent knows a child
  • Practical wisdom as opposed to theoretical knowledge
emotions as judgments
Emotions as Judgments
  • Nussbaum, deSousa, Soloman, Elgin
  • Each emotion entails a cognitive appraisal
  • These appraisals are central features of emotion
  • To be angry is to make a judgment that one has been wronged
emotions as perceptions
Emotions as Perceptions
  • How I see a situation determines what I think is salient or important in the situation
  • It determines what I attend to
  • We determine what is puzzling, saddening, worthy of inquiry.
moral perceptions as emotions
Moral Perceptions as Emotions
  • If the function of emotions is to assess salience and to communicate it, then education of emotions are central to education.
  • A person weak in caring thinking will not even notice the moral dimension of an existing situation, and if he does, will choose to ignore it.
emotions as judgments1
Emotions as Judgments
  • Rarely does knowledge of moral principles or moral reasoning alone prompt a child to recognize the existence of a moral problems.
  • It is our emotions that motivate us to distinguish what is moral in the situation.
emotion as judgment
Emotion as Judgment
  • It is our emotions that move us to act to correct the situation.
  • Moral perception takes the form of preoccupation - a caring from the inside. (Weil, Murdoch, Noddings)
emotion as judgment1
Emotion as Judgment
  • The caring we have received from others is often converted into caring thinking on our part..
  • What Nodding calls caring is an emotional judgment.
  • Where it not, it would be difficult to explain why one person allows herself to become involved, and another not.
summary
Summary
  • To recognize a problem as a moral one is a judgments
  • To recognize a moral problem is also a moment of caring thinking.
  • Remove the emotion and it is highly doubtful that cognition alone would notice the moral need, much less act on it.
a scenario
A scenario
  • Upon seeing a hungry child asking for money, one child is disdainful of child’s appearance, another finds herself compassionate and a third is indignant that this situation exists in a wealthy country.
  • The three emotions, disdain, compassion and indignation rest on a common judgment, something like “This kid is in a miserable condition. I’m not but I could be someday.”
slide14
One child is threatened by the situation and experiences disdain or disgust as a means of dealing with this terrifying thought.
  • The second, perhaps recognizing the same threat, is compassionate and by helping the child attempts to combat the threat itself
slide15
The third child attempts may very well be moved to bring attention of others to the injustice of the situation.
  • All three are judgments of salience.