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Initial Teacher Training and CPD in Further Education in Scotland. Dr Roy Canning Lifelong Learning Group University of Stirling . Further Education in Scotland. 43 colleges 350,00 students 14 per cent of students have a disability 57 per cent are females 4.7 per cent ethnic background.

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Initial Teacher Training and CPD in Further Education in Scotland

Dr Roy Canning

Lifelong Learning Group

University of Stirling


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Further Education in Scotland Scotland

  • 43 colleges

  • 350,00 students

  • 14 per cent of students have a disability

  • 57 per cent are females

  • 4.7 per cent ethnic background


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Further Education in Scotland Scotland

  • Median age of males is 22 and for females 31

  • Twice as much activity delivered to most deprived areas compared with affluent area

  • 94 per cent of activity linked to a recognised qualification


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Qualification type and subjects Scotland

Qualifications

  • HND, HNC, Level 3 SVQs, Level 2 SVQs, other non-advanced

    Subjects

  • Family and personal care, health care, IT, construction, engineering and business


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Scottish Policy Context Scotland

Pre-election

  • Determined to Succeed (2002)

  • A Curriculum for Excellence (2004)

  • Lifelong Partners (2005)

  • Not in Education, Employment or Training NEET (2006)


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Scottish Policy Context Scotland

Post-election

  • Early Years Education

  • School class sizes

  • De-cluttering of the complex delivery networks at a local level (Enterprise and Skills)

  • Increase opportunities for vocational education and strengthen links between schools, colleges and businesses


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Initial Teacher Education Scotlandin FE (Scotland)

  • Vocational subjects

  • Anderson Committee (1993) National Guidelines for ITE (1997)

  • Professional Development Awards (HN units from SQA)

  • Review (2002) CPD;14-16 agenda; legislative requirements;



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Teaching Qualifications 2004/5

  • 89 per cent of teaching staff are teacher trained

  • 50 per cent of part-time staff are teacher trained

  • 96-99 per cent of all staff are qualified in their subject area


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Staff in Colleges 2004/5

  • Majority of staff have permanent full time contracts

  • Significant number of P/T staff in colleges

  • More females than males employed

  • Approx 10% of staff under the age of 30 years


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Becoming an FE lecturer 2004/5

  • In –service student (TQFE) 12-18 months part-time

  • Timescales on completion of TQFE: 3 years and 5 years

  • Pre-service student (TQFE) –one year full-time


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Knowledge of Experience 2004/5:

Competence-based standards (codified)

Reflective Practice

Accreditation

Becoming an FE Lecturer


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Ways of Knowing 2004/5

‘Knowledge of Experience’

  • Higher adjudicating knowledge (Kant)

  • Modernity and Reflexivity (Giddens)

  • ‘Professional Practitioner’ (Schon, Kolb)


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Knowledge of Experience: view from no where 2004/5

  • Withered and diminished kind of experience

  • Accumulation from the past (residue)

  • Thinking about only what we already know

  • Experience does not belong personally to a subject (saturated self)

  • Nor does it only arise in the mediating space of subject and object


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Ways of Knowing 2004/5

  • Conflation of experience and knowledge of experience

  • Immersion in the world; can’t leave you where you began

  • No separation of experience and experimentation; nor of theory and practice

  • Pre-reflective, provisional, open, becoming

  • ‘risk-laden dice’

  • Co-production of experience (Bilett) and collective competence (Boreham)

    Raymond Williams: structures of feeling

    Walter Benjamin: speculative knowledge

    Deleuze: Difference and repetition