slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Engaging the Reluctant Reader PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Engaging the Reluctant Reader

play fullscreen
1 / 14
Download Presentation

Engaging the Reluctant Reader - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

sebastian
149 Views
Download Presentation

Engaging the Reluctant Reader

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

    1. Engaging the Reluctant Reader Reading Vocabulary Module by: ReLeah A. Lent Segment 1 ~ Introduction: What do we know about Vocabulary? Time: 30 minutes Begin the workshop by showing participants, Definitions, and asking them to discuss the quote with others at their table. Segment 1 ~ Introduction: What do we know about Vocabulary? Time: 30 minutes Begin the workshop by showing participants, Definitions, and asking them to discuss the quote with others at their table.

    2. Definitions A definition is the enclosing of a wilderness of idea within a wall of words. Samuel Butler, 1835-1902, Notebooks (1912) Refer participants to Handout #1, Vocabulary Prediction Guide, and tell them that this an instructional tool that introduces learners to a new topic by having them make predictions about the topic before instruction begins. Prediction guides (sometimes called anticipation guides) generate active, rather than passive, learning. Ask each person, individually, to circle A for Agree or D for Disagree beside each statement in Handout #1. Reassure participants that this is not an evaluation or a pre-test. After everyone has completed Handout #1, allow 10 minutes for groups to discuss any statements about which there was disagreement at their tables. Tell them that you will return to the prediction guide at the end of the session. Refer participants to Handout #1, Vocabulary Prediction Guide, and tell them that this an instructional tool that introduces learners to a new topic by having them make predictions about the topic before instruction begins. Prediction guides (sometimes called anticipation guides) generate active, rather than passive, learning. Ask each person, individually, to circle A for Agree or D for Disagree beside each statement in Handout #1. Reassure participants that this is not an evaluation or a pre-test. After everyone has completed Handout #1, allow 10 minutes for groups to discuss any statements about which there was disagreement at their tables. Tell them that you will return to the prediction guide at the end of the session.

    3. Effective Vocabulary Study Allows frequent encounters with words through wide and varied reading Encourages extension of words beyond the classroom Connects new words to prior knowledge Provides opportunities for deep, conceptual meaning through dialogue and exploration Focuses on words or concepts that will have the most significant impact on comprehension rather than covering a list of many words superficially Segment 2 Vocabulary Instruction for Adult Learners Time: 15 Minutes Ask participants to read silently Handout #2, How I Learn New Words. After participants have finished reading, ask them how they learn new words. Allow a few minutes for discussion at tables and then ask for volunteers to share with the entire group. Chart the responses. Show Effective Vocabulary Study, Handout #3, and compare the responses generated by the group regarding how they learn new vocabulary to the bullets in the slide. Ask participants to reflect on how often they use the instructional practices in Slide #2 in their classrooms. Segment 2 Vocabulary Instruction for Adult Learners Time: 15 Minutes Ask participants to read silently Handout #2, How I Learn New Words. After participants have finished reading, ask them how they learn new words. Allow a few minutes for discussion at tables and then ask for volunteers to share with the entire group. Chart the responses. Show Effective Vocabulary Study, Handout #3, and compare the responses generated by the group regarding how they learn new vocabulary to the bullets in the slide. Ask participants to reflect on how often they use the instructional practices in Slide #2 in their classrooms.

    4. Effective Vocabulary Study Utilizes instructional practices that lead to independent word study Uses concrete artifacts, such as pictures, when possible Concentrates on concepts rather than single definitions Finds relationships among words --Adapted from Janet Allens chart: Developing Effective Practices in Vocabulary Instruction, Words,Words,Words, pg. 107. Show participants Slide #3, The Importance of Vocabulary Instruction. Show participants Slide #3, The Importance of Vocabulary Instruction.

    5. The Importance of Vocabulary Instruction The importance of planned vocabulary instruction in all content areas is supported by Baker, Simmons, and Kameenui: Vocabulary acquisition is crucial to academic development. Not only do students need a rich body of word knowledge to succeed in basic skill areas, they also need a specialized vocabulary to learn content area material. Allan, J., Words, Words,Words, pg. 11. Point out to participants that students should create a rich body of word knowledge before, during and after reading. Vocabulary instructional practices also should be ongoing. The rest of the session will focus on specific instructional practices that may be utilized and adapted by teachers in helping students become independent word learners.Point out to participants that students should create a rich body of word knowledge before, during and after reading. Vocabulary instructional practices also should be ongoing. The rest of the session will focus on specific instructional practices that may be utilized and adapted by teachers in helping students become independent word learners.

    6. New Vocabulary Do You Know It? Write each of these words in the left-hand column of Handout #4, New Vocabulary Do You Know It? Mark the box that most closely describes your familiarity with each word. New Vocabulary Exemplar Neurological Phenomenon Genetic Nervous System Intact Consensus Prelingual Segment 3 Increasing vocabulary before reading Time: 30 Minutes Materials: One dictionary at each table Note to facilitator: Several studies indicate that intensive preteaching of vocabulary can improve comprehension. While it may not always be feasible for teachers of adult learners to engage students in whole-class pre-reading activities, they should be aware of the importance of this practice. Teachers should show students how to look at new vocabulary identified at the beginning of each textbook chapter and find the words in the text (usually in bold). Make sure that students have a working definition of the term before beginning study. Tell participants that the next activity will demonstrate the importance of previewing vocabulary before reading. Show participants, New Vocabulary, and have them write the words in the left-hand column of Handout # 4, New Vocabulary Do You Know It? They should then mark the appropriate box on Handout #4 to indicate their familiarity with the words.Segment 3 Increasing vocabulary before reading Time: 30 Minutes Materials: One dictionary at each table Note to facilitator: Several studies indicate that intensive preteaching of vocabulary can improve comprehension. While it may not always be feasible for teachers of adult learners to engage students in whole-class pre-reading activities, they should be aware of the importance of this practice. Teachers should show students how to look at new vocabulary identified at the beginning of each textbook chapter and find the words in the text (usually in bold). Make sure that students have a working definition of the term before beginning study. Tell participants that the next activity will demonstrate the importance of previewing vocabulary before reading. Show participants, New Vocabulary, and have them write the words in the left-hand column of Handout # 4, New Vocabulary Do You Know It? They should then mark the appropriate box on Handout #4 to indicate their familiarity with the words.

    7. Vocabulary Log Answers Exemplar - example Phenomenon - an unusual fact, thing or occurrence Nervous System - the organized network of all nerve cells in an organism branching out from the central nervous system, which comprises the spinal cord and brain. Consensus - general agreement Neurological - pertaining to the nervous system Genetic -pertaining to the inherited characteristics of an organism Intact - left complete Prelingual - pre - before; lingual - pertaining to language; sounds made by the tongue. Allow each group to engage in a table discussion to deepen understanding of the words. Refer participants to Handout #5, Vocabulary Log. Ask participants to write each word in the left column and compose a working definition of each word based upon their discussion and/or background knowledge in the middle column. Make sure each table has a dictionary to confirm or revise their thinking. Note to facilitator: The above are dictionary definitions for the Vocabulary Log words. Point out to participants that the goal of vocabulary study is for words to be owned, that is, for them, to become a workable part of ones vocabulary. This occurs when learners have multiple encounters with words and when they can make a personal connection to the words. Ask participants to find some association or connection to each of the words as a way to help them remember the meaning and note that connection in the last column of Handout #6. Sometimes a drawing or illustration will serve as a connection. Now have participants read silently Handout # 7, A Closer Look at Everyday Natural Learning. Allow each group to engage in a table discussion to deepen understanding of the words. Refer participants to Handout #5, Vocabulary Log. Ask participants to write each word in the left column and compose a working definition of each word based upon their discussion and/or background knowledge in the middle column. Make sure each table has a dictionary to confirm or revise their thinking. Note to facilitator: The above are dictionary definitions for the Vocabulary Log words. Point out to participants that the goal of vocabulary study is for words to be owned, that is, for them, to become a workable part of ones vocabulary. This occurs when learners have multiple encounters with words and when they can make a personal connection to the words. Ask participants to find some association or connection to each of the words as a way to help them remember the meaning and note that connection in the last column of Handout #6. Sometimes a drawing or illustration will serve as a connection. Now have participants read silently Handout # 7, A Closer Look at Everyday Natural Learning.

    8. Vocabulary Instruction Ask participants how the previous discussion of vocabulary increased their comprehension of the article. Although participants may have already known the vocabulary, ask them to consider how such pre-vocabulary work may help their students comprehend a passage of equal difficulty. Segment 4 Vocabulary Instruction During Reading Time: 45 minutes Ask participants what their students do when they come to a word they dont know. They may say that students will skip the word and continue reading. One of the most important metacognitive vocabulary strategies is for learners to become aware of words that they dont know and make a conscious decision about what to do with the word. Refer participants to Handout # 8, How do You Unravel Meanings? an assessment tool that may prove helpful as they plan vocabulary instruction. It can also help students gain insight into their own reading habits. Ask participants how the previous discussion of vocabulary increased their comprehension of the article. Although participants may have already known the vocabulary, ask them to consider how such pre-vocabulary work may help their students comprehend a passage of equal difficulty. Segment 4 Vocabulary Instruction During Reading Time: 45 minutes Ask participants what their students do when they come to a word they dont know. They may say that students will skip the word and continue reading. One of the most important metacognitive vocabulary strategies is for learners to become aware of words that they dont know and make a conscious decision about what to do with the word. Refer participants to Handout # 8, How do You Unravel Meanings? an assessment tool that may prove helpful as they plan vocabulary instruction. It can also help students gain insight into their own reading habits.

    9. Context Clues Janet Allen in her book Words, Words, Words discusses the value of using context for increased vocabulary. There are many who see this (learning words from context) as an unreliable source of definitional information. - pg. 16. Nagy et al. estimate that from 25 to 50 percent of annual vocabulary growth can be attributed to incidental learning from context while reading. So, while single context is an unreliable method of learning new words, extensive reading, multiple exposures to the same word, and instruction in learning from context lead to increased comprehension. - pg. 9 Point out to participants that the goal of all vocabulary instruction is for students to become independent word learners, to find strategies that will help them unlock and then internalize a words meaning when they come upon unfamiliar words in their reading. Such strategies facilitate deep, conceptualized meaning rather than just locating and memorizing a simple definition. Refer participants to Handout #9, Where the Sea Used to Be, a novella by Rick Bass. Ask them to read it silently. Ask participants to note the last word in the passage: conspicuous. Ask them if it is possible to figure out the word from the context. Show Context Clues? and ask participants to discuss at their tables their thoughts on using contextual clues for finding meanings.Point out to participants that the goal of all vocabulary instruction is for students to become independent word learners, to find strategies that will help them unlock and then internalize a words meaning when they come upon unfamiliar words in their reading. Such strategies facilitate deep, conceptualized meaning rather than just locating and memorizing a simple definition. Refer participants to Handout #9, Where the Sea Used to Be, a novella by Rick Bass. Ask them to read it silently. Ask participants to note the last word in the passage: conspicuous. Ask them if it is possible to figure out the word from the context. Show Context Clues? and ask participants to discuss at their tables their thoughts on using contextual clues for finding meanings.

    10. Context Clues Baumann and Kameenui (1991) summarize the research related to context in the following three points: Context clues are relatively ineffective means for inferring the meaning of specific words. Students are more apt to learn specific new vocabulary when definitional information is combined with contextual clues than when contextual analysis is used in isolation. Research on teaching contextual analysis as a transferable and generalizable strategy for word leaning is promising but limited. pg. 16 Ask one person from each table to report the gist of the table discussion. Ask: How, then, do students find the meanings of unfamiliar words? Refer participants to Handout #10, What if you Just Dont Know the Word? and ask them to think about answering the questions as if they were a student who got stumped on the word conspicuous. Ask one person from each table to report the gist of the table discussion. Ask: How, then, do students find the meanings of unfamiliar words? Refer participants to Handout #10, What if you Just Dont Know the Word? and ask them to think about answering the questions as if they were a student who got stumped on the word conspicuous.

    11. Questions for Vocabulary Instruction Is it necessary that readers know all the words in a passage for effective comprehension? What does it mean to know a word? Are you responsible, as their teacher, for providing some type of instruction to students on all words in a new lesson? Bring the group back together by showing, Are All Words Equally Important?Bring the group back together by showing, Are All Words Equally Important?

    12. Are All Words Equally Important? We have found the notion of tiers to be a helpful lens through which to consider words for instructional attention. Tier One words consist of the most basic words--such as clock, baby, happy-- those that rarely require instruction. Tier Two words are high-frequency words for mature language learnerssuch as coincidence, absurd, industrious. Instruction in these words can add productively to an individuals language ability. Tier Three words include words whose frequency is quite low, often limited to specific domains, such as isotope, lathe, peninsula. --taken from Beck, McKeown, Kucan, Bringing Words to Life, Beck, pgs. 15-16. Ask: Is the word conspicuous in the above passage a Tier One, Two or Three word? Most should say that it is a Tier Two word. Show, Multiple Exposures to Words. Ask: Is the word conspicuous in the above passage a Tier One, Two or Three word? Most should say that it is a Tier Two word. Show, Multiple Exposures to Words.

    13. Multiple Exposures to Words One of the strongest findings about vocabulary instruction, whether direct instruction or learning words from context, is that multiple encounters are required before a word is really known (e.g., Stahl & Fairbanks, 1986), that is, if it is to affect a students comprehension and become a useful and permanent part of the students vocabulary repertoire. Beck, McKeown, Kucan, Bringing Words to Life, pg. 73 Ask: If we agree that the word conspicuous is a Tier Two word and that students need multiple encounters to develop a deep understanding of the word, what are some instructional practices that will provide effective vocabulary instruction? Chart responses from group. Assign each table one of the following instructional vocabulary practices from Handouts #11-#15. Show, Group Vocabulary Assignments. Ask: If we agree that the word conspicuous is a Tier Two word and that students need multiple encounters to develop a deep understanding of the word, what are some instructional practices that will provide effective vocabulary instruction? Chart responses from group. Assign each table one of the following instructional vocabulary practices from Handouts #11-#15. Show, Group Vocabulary Assignments.

    14. Group Vocabulary Assignments Group 1 - Handout #11 - List-Group- Label Group 2 - Handout #12 - Open-Ended Concept Map Group 3 - Handout #13 - Shades of Meaning Group 4 - Handout #14 - Word Analysis Group 5 - Handout #15 - Sensory Language Chart Groups will have 10 minutes to prepare a product based on the instructions in their handout regarding the word conspicuous. At the end of 10 minutes, allow each group 3-5 minutes to make a presentation to the whole group. Groups will have 10 minutes to prepare a product based on the instructions in their handout regarding the word conspicuous. At the end of 10 minutes, allow each group 3-5 minutes to make a presentation to the whole group.