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Burnout 3: Case Study (Outline). What is Burnout 3? What does this mean? How did we satisfy these constraints? Racecars Traffic system Aggressive driving What did we learn?. What is Burnout 3?. Racing Aggressive driving Crashing Traffic Fast paced, twitch gaming. What does this mean?.

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burnout 3 case study outline
Burnout 3: Case Study(Outline)
  • What is Burnout 3?
  • What does this mean?
  • How did we satisfy these constraints?
    • Racecars
    • Traffic system
    • Aggressive driving
  • What did we learn?
what is burnout 3
What is Burnout 3?
  • Racing
  • Aggressive driving
  • Crashing
  • Traffic
  • Fast paced, twitch gaming
what does this mean
What does this mean?
  • Racing
    • Cars must be in the right position, travelling at the right speed
    • Car movement should be as smooth and similar to offline as possible
    • Cars will only change speed/direction gradually
  • Aggressive driving
    • Cars really, really must be in the right position, travelling at the right speed
    • Important events must be the same on all consoles (slam/shunt/takedown)
what does this mean4
What does this mean?
  • Crashing
    • Cars must be in the right position, travelling at the right speed
    • Cars must be able to change velocity sharply
  • Traffic
    • Traffic system must handle up to 254 cars without maxing out bandwidth (10kB/s)
  • Fast paced, twitch gaming
    • Client must be authoritative
racecars
Racecars
  • Client owns their own position
    • Your car doesn’t jump or move unexpectedly
    • Open to cheating
racecars version 0 1
Racecars version 0.1
  • Send matrix and velocity in update packet
  • Put the racecar where the packet says, when it arrives
    • Cars are seen in the past
    • Cars jump when latency varies (and it does!)
    • Simple and cheap (memory + CPU)
racecars version 0 5
Racecars version 0.5
  • Buffer message
  • Apply it when its time has come
    • Cars are smoother
    • Cars are even more ‘in the past’ because buffering adds latency
    • If you don’t apply packets you receive ‘late’ you are artificially increasing packet loss too
    • Uses slightly more memory, but still cheap in terms of CPU
    • More complicated, and applying ‘late’ messages makes it even more complicated
racecars final version
Racecars final version
  • When message arrives extrapolate position forwards in time
  • First attempt: extrapolating position using velocity
  • Second attempt: Lightweight version of physics
    • Cars are seen in the present
    • Not as smooth as version 0.5
    • Expensive in CPU
traffic system
Traffic System
  • Size of traffic ID/position/orientation 10 bytes
  • Traffic system is updating up to 254 cars at once
  • So total packet size to send position and orientation of all traffic is 2540 bytes!
  • Traffic system must be deterministic
traffic system10
Traffic System
  • Based on lanes
  • Traffic cars follow a param along a lane
  • Traffic cars stop at traffic lights
  • Traffic cars change lane at certain points (splitters)
  • Divergence detection
    • In game replays helped lots!
crashing traffic
Crashing traffic
  • If a car crashes you can’t remove it from the traffic system
    • It becomes invisible, and ignored by physics
  • Traffic ownership
    • You detect that an unowned traffic car has crashed
    • You start sending out updates (you own it)
    • Other people apply your updates
    • Is possible for more than one player to own a traffic car
  • Can’t afford to extrapolate, so run in the past (racecar version 0.5)
    • Change to past masked by smoke and particles!
aggressive driving
Aggressive Driving
  • Send extra info in updates (slam/shunt/takedown)
  • Send multiple times in case of packet loss, but only for about half a second
pickups
Pickups
  • Similar to aggressive driving
  • Two players can get the same pickup
end of race
End of race
  • Send results packet
    • Race time
    • Fastest lap
    • Crash damage
    • Pickups
  • Susceptible to cheating
what we learnt
What we learnt
  • Plan to network from the outset
    • Traffic system
  • Try anything unknown in prototype
    • Racecars
    • Crashing traffic
  • Networking strategy is game-specific
    • Reassess if game design changes
  • Develop and test in real world conditions