montana small grain guide l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Montana Small Grain Guide PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Montana Small Grain Guide

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14

Montana Small Grain Guide - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 180 Views
  • Uploaded on

Montana Small Grain Guide. Pages 42-48. Crop Rotation: Sidney Research Center Results. Highest annual yields were obtained with continuous cropping Residue Management for snow trapping was very important Adequate fertility & weed control needed

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Montana Small Grain Guide


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
crop rotation sidney research center results
Crop Rotation: Sidney Research Center Results
  • Highest annual yields were obtained with continuous cropping
  • Residue Management for snow trapping was very important
  • Adequate fertility & weed control needed
  • Rotating spring & winter grains good for breaking disease & weed cycles
  • Residue from winter wheat can cause seedbed problems
crop rotation sidney research center results3
Crop Rotation: Sidney Research Center Results
  • Spring wheat stubble was the best for recropping; fewer volunteer plants
  • Wild oats, cheatgrass, pigeon grass & volunteer grain were serious problems with continuous cropping
  • Cephalosporium stripe when winter wheat grown in monoculture
crop rotation
Crop Rotation
  • Three year rotations worked best
  • Spring wheat after oats or barley lowered wheat quality
  • Feed grains after wheat wasn’t a factor
  • Forage crops (corn, oats, barley) can replace a spring grain
    • stubble is insufficient for trapping snow
crop rotation5
Crop Rotation
  • Sunflower or Safflower can replace spring grains
    • can utilize Nitrogen that has leached below the root zone of spring grains
tillage residue management
Tillage & Residue Management
  • Can reduce wind & water erosion
  • Conserve moisture
  • Trap snow
  • Tillage implements determine degree of residue incorporation
conservation tillage
Conservation Tillage
  • Stubble mulch: minimum tillage while maintaining a protective residue cover
  • Ecofallow: uses chemicals and tillage together to control weeds & conserve soil moisture
  • No-till: seed directly into residue of previous crop
how much residue remains after tillage
How much residue remains after tillage?
  • Multiply bushels/acre you harvested by 100
  • Multiply by the percentage from chart
    • Moldboard Plow 5%
    • Chisel Plow 75%
    • Harrow 80%
    • Disk 50-60%
    • Rodweeder 85-90%
  • Multiply by factors for each subsequent pass
how much residue remains after tillage9
How much residue remains after tillage?
  • 20 bu. Per acre crop
  • 20 X 100 = 2,000 lbs.
  • Summerfallow using a chisel plow
  • 2,000 X .75 = 1,500 lbs.
  • 1,500 X .75 = 1,125 lbs.
  • 1,125 X .75 = 843 lbs
how much residue should be on the soil surface
How much residue should be on the soil surface?
  • 1,500 - 2,000 lbs per acre
  • No tillage would be necessary from a 20 bu/acre crop
  • With no-till drills and adapting drills, tillage to incorporate residue is NOT needed
affect of tillage on the soil
Affect of tillage on the soil
  • Loosens soil in the plow layer
  • Increases soil aeration
  • Increases water infiltration
  • Long-term results: less aggregated, more compacted
soil compaction
Soil Compaction
  • 90% of soil surface is traversed by wheels during seeding
  • 25% at harvest
  • 60% when straw is baled and hauled off
deep tillage
Deep Tillage
  • Subsoiling: breaks or shatters compacted soil layers (Hardpan)
  • Done at 16” - 36” soil depth
  • Should be done in fall when soil is fairly dry
  • Need for subsoiling can be avoided where management practices prevent compaction
    • reducing secondary tillage operations
    • adding organic matter