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Kernel methods in natural language processing

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernel Methods in Natural Language Processing

Jean-Michel RENDERS

Xerox Research Center Europe (France)

ACL’04 TUTORIAL


Warnings

ACL-04 Tutorial

Warnings

  • This presentation contains extra slides (examples, more detailed views, further explanations, …) that are not present in the official notes

  • If needed, the complete presentation can be downloaded on the Kermit Web Site www.euro-kermit.org(feedback welcome)


Agenda

ACL-04 Tutorial

Agenda

  • What’s the philosophy of Kernel Methods?

  • How to use Kernels Methods in Learning tasks?

  • Kernels for text (BOW, latent concept, string, word sequence, tree and Fisher Kernels)

  • Applications to NLP tasks


ACL-04 Tutorial

Plan

  • What’s the philosophy of Kernel Methods?

  • How to use Kernels Methods in Learning tasks?

  • Kernels for text (BOW, latent concept, string, word sequence, tree and Fisher Kernels)

  • Applications to NLP tasks


Kernel methods intuitive idea

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernel Methods : intuitive idea

  • Find a mapping f such that, in the new space, problem solving is easier (e.g. linear)

  • The kernel represents the similarity between two objects (documents, terms, …), defined as the dot-product in this new vector space

  • But the mapping is left implicit

  • Easy generalization of a lot of dot-product (or distance) based pattern recognition algorithms


Kernel methods the mapping

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernel Methods : the mapping

f

f

f

Original Space

Feature (Vector) Space


Kernel more formal definition

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernel : more formal definition

  • A kernel k(x,y)

    • is a similarity measure

    • defined by an implicit mapping f,

    • from the original space to a vector space (feature space)

    • such that: k(x,y)=f(x)•f(y)

  • This similarity measure and the mapping include:

    • Invariance or other a priori knowledge

    • Simpler structure (linear representation of the data)

    • The class of functions the solution is taken from

    • Possibly infinite dimension (hypothesis space for learning)

    • … but still computational efficiency when computing k(x,y)


Benefits from kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Benefits from kernels

  • Generalizes (nonlinearly) pattern recognition algorithms in clustering, classification, density estimation, …

    • When these algorithms are dot-product based, by replacing the dot product (x•y)by k(x,y)=f(x)•f(y)

      e.g.: linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, perceptron, SOM, PCA, ICA, …

      NM. This often implies to work with the “dual” form of the algo.

    • When these algorithms are distance-based, by replacing d(x,y) by k(x,x)+k(y,y)-2k(x,y)

  • Freedom of choosing f implies a large variety of learning algorithms


Valid kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Valid Kernels

  • The function k(x,y) is a valid kernel, if there exists a mapping f into a vector space (with a dot-product) such that k can be expressed as k(x,y)=f(x)•f(y)

  • Theorem: k(x,y) is a valid kernel if k is positive definite and symmetric (Mercer Kernel)

    • A function is P.D. if

    • In other words, the Gram matrix K (whose elements are k(xi,xj)) must be positive definite for all xi, xj of the input space

    • One possible choice of f(x): k(•,x) (maps a point x to a function k(•,x)  feature space with infinite dimension!)


Example of kernels i

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example of Kernels (I)

  • Polynomial Kernels: k(x,y)=(x•y)d

    • Assume we know most information is contained in monomials (e.g. multiword terms) of degree d (e.g. d=2: x12, x22, x1x2)

    • Theorem: the (implicit) feature space contains all possible monomials of degree d (ex: n=250; d=5; dim F=1010)

    • But kernel computation is only marginally more complex than standard dot product!

    • For k(x,y)=(x•y+1)d , the (implicit) feature space contains all possible monomials up to degree d !


Examples of kernels iii

ACL-04 Tutorial

f

Polynomial kernel (n=2)

RBF kernel (n=2)

Examples of Kernels (III)


The kernel gram matrix

ACL-04 Tutorial

The Kernel Gram Matrix

  • With KM-based learning, the sole information used from the training data set is the Kernel Gram Matrix

  • If the kernel is valid, K is symmetric definite-positive .


The right kernel for the right task

ACL-04 Tutorial

The right kernel for the right task

  • Assume a categorization task: the ideal Kernel matrix is

    • k(xi,xj)=+1 if xi and xj belong to the same class

    • k(xi,xj)=-1 if xi and xj belong to different classes

    •  concept of target alignment (adapt the kernel to the labels), where alignment is the similarity between the current gram matrix and the ideal one [“two clusters” kernel]

  • A certainly bad kernel is the diagonal kernel

    • k(xi,xj)=+1 if xi = xj

    • k(xi,xj)=0 elsewhere

    • All points are orthogonal : no more cluster, no more structure


How to choose kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

How to choose kernels?

  • There is no absolute rules for choosing the right kernel, adapted to a particular problem

  • Kernel design can start from the desired feature space, from combination or from data

  • Some considerations are important:

    • Use kernel to introduce a priori (domain) knowledge

    • Be sure to keep some information structure in the feature space

    • Experimentally, there is some “robustness” in the choice, if the chosen kernels provide an acceptable trade-off between

      • simpler and more efficient structure (e.g. linear separability), which requires some “explosion”

      • Information structure preserving, which requires that the “explosion” is not too strong.


How to build new kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

How to build new kernels

  • Kernel combinations, preserving validity:


Kernels built from data i

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernels built from data (I)

  • In general, this mode of kernel design can use both labeled and unlabeled data of the training set! Very useful for semi-supervised learning

  • Intuitively, kernels define clusters in the feature space, and we want to find interesting clusters, I.e. cluster components that can be associated with labels. In general, extract (non-linear) relationship between features which will catalyze learning results


Examples

ACL-04 Tutorial

Examples





Kernels built from data ii

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernels built from data (II)

  • Basic ideas:

    • Convex linear combination of kernels in a given family: find the best coefficient of eigen-components of the (complete) kernel matrix by maximizing the alignment on the labeled training data.

    • Find a linear transformation of the feature space such that, in the new space, pre-specified similarity or dissimilarity constraints are respected (as best as possible) and in a kernelizable way

    • Build a generative model of the data, then use the Fischer Kernel or Marginalized kernels (see later)


Kernels for texts

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernels for texts

  • Similarity between documents?

    • Seen as ‘bag of words’ : dot product or polynomial kernels (multi-words)

    • Seen as set of concepts : GVSM kernels, Kernel LSI (or Kernel PCA), Kernel ICA, …possibly multilingual

    • Seen as string of characters: string kernels

    • Seen as string of terms/concepts: word sequence kernels

    • Seen as trees (dependency or parsing trees): tree kernels

    • Etc.

Increased use of syntactic and semantic info


Agenda1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Agenda

  • What’s the philosophy of Kernel Methods?

  • How to use Kernels Methods in Learning tasks?

  • Kernels for text (BOW, latent concept, string, word sequence, tree and Fisher Kernels)

  • Applications to NLP tasks


Kernels and learning

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernels and Learning

  • In Kernel-based learning algorithms, problem solving is now decoupled into:

    • A general purpose learning algorithm (e.g. SVM, PCA, …) – Often linear algorithm (well-funded, robustness, …)

    • A problem specific kernel

Simple (linear) learning algorithm

Complex Pattern Recognition Task

Specific Kernel function


Learning in the feature space issues

ACL-04 Tutorial

Learning in the feature space: Issues

  • High dimensionality allows to render flat complex patterns by “explosion”

    • Computational issue, solved by designing kernels (efficiency in space and time)

    • Statistical issue (generalization), solved by the learning algorithm and also by the kernel

      • e.g. SVM, solving this complexity problem by maximizing the margin and the dual formulation

  • E.g. RBF-kernel, playing with the s parameter

  • With adequate learning algorithms and kernels, high dimensionality is no longer an issue


Current synthesis

ACL-04 Tutorial

Current Synthesis

  • Modularity and re-usability

    • Same kernel ,different learning algorithms

    • Different kernels, same learning algorithms

  • This tutorial is allowed to focus only on designing kernels for textual data

Data 1 (Text)

Learning Algo 1

Kernel 1

Gram Matrix

(not necessarily stored)

Data 2 (Image)

Learning Algo 2

Kernel 2

Gram Matrix


Agenda2

ACL-04 Tutorial

Agenda

  • What’s the philosophy of Kernel Methods?

  • How to use Kernels Methods in Learning tasks?

  • Kernels for text (BOW, latent concept, string, word sequence, tree and Fisher Kernels)

  • Applications to NLP tasks


Kernels for texts1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernels for texts

  • Similarity between documents?

    • Seen as ‘bag of words’ : dot product or polynomial kernels (multi-words)

    • Seen as set of concepts : GVSM kernels, Kernel LSI (or Kernel PCA), Kernel ICA, …possibly multilingual

    • Seen as string of characters: string kernels

    • Seen as string of terms/concepts: word sequence kernels

    • Seen as trees (dependency or parsing trees): tree kernels

    • Seen as the realization of probability distribution (generative model)


Strategies of design

ACL-04 Tutorial

Strategies of Design

  • Kernel as a way to encode prior information

    • Invariance: synonymy, document length, …

    • Linguistic processing: word normalisation, semantics, stopwords, weighting scheme, …

  • Convolution Kernels: text is a recursively-defined data structure. How to build “global” kernels form local (atomic level) kernels?

  • Generative model-based kernels: the “topology” of the problem will be translated into a kernel function


Strategies of design1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Strategies of Design

  • Kernel as a way to encode prior information

    • Invariance: synonymy, document length, …

    • Linguistic processing: word normalisation, semantics, stopwords, weighting scheme, …

  • Convolution Kernels: text is a recursively-defined data structure. How to build “global” kernels form local (atomic level) kernels?

  • Generative model-based kernels: the “topology” of the problem will be translated into a kernel function


Bag of words kernels i

ACL-04 Tutorial

‘Bag of words’ kernels (I)

  • Document seen as a vector d, indexed by all the elements of a (controlled) dictionary. The entry is equal to the number of occurrences.

  • A training corpus is therefore represented by a Term-Document matrix,

    noted D=[d1d2 … dm-1 dm]

  • The “nature” of word: will be discussed later

  • From this basic representation, we will apply a sequence of successive embeddings, resulting in a global (valid) kernel with all desired properties


Bow kernels ii

ACL-04 Tutorial

BOW kernels (II)

  • Properties:

    • All order information is lost (syntactical relationships, local context, …)

    • Feature space has dimension N (size of the dictionary)

  • Similarity is basically defined by:

    k(d1,d2)=d1•d2= d1t.d2

    or, normalized (cosine similarity):

  • Efficiency provided by sparsity (and sparse dot-product algo): O(|d1|+|d2|)


Bag of words kernels enhancements

ACL-04 Tutorial

‘Bag of words’ kernels: enhancements

  • The choice of indexing terms:

    • Exploit linguistic enhancements:

      • Lemma / Morpheme & stem

      • Disambiguised lemma (lemma+POS)

      • Noun Phrase (or useful collocation, n-grams)

      • Named entity (with type)

      • Grammatical dependencies (represented as feature vector components)

      • Ex: The human resource director of NavyCorp communicated important reports on ship reliability.

    • Exploit IR lessons

      • Stopword removal

      • Feature selection based on frequency

      • Weighting schemes (e.g. idf )

    • NB. Using polynomial kernels up to degree p, is a natural and efficient way of considering all (up-to-)p-grams (with different weights actually), but order is not taken into account (“sinking ships” is the same as “shipping sinks”)


Bag of words kernels enhancements1

ACL-04 Tutorial

‘Bag of words’ kernels: enhancements

  • Weighting scheme :

    • the traditional idf weighting scheme tfitfi*log(N/ni)

    • is a linear transformation (scaling) (d)  W.(d)(where W is diagonal):k(d1,d2)=(d1)t.(Wt.W).(d2)can still be efficiently computed (O(|d1|+|d2|))

  • Semantic expansion (e.g. synonyms)

    • Assume some term-term similarity matrix Q (positive definite) : k(d1,d2)=(d1)t.Q.(d2)

    • In general, no sparsity (Q: propagates)

    • How to choose Q (some kernel matrix for term)?


Semantic smoothing kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Semantic Smoothing Kernels

  • Synonymy and other term relationships:

    • GVSM Kernel: the term-term co-occurrence matrix (DDt) is used in the kernel: k(d1,d2)=d1t.(D.Dt).d2

    • The completely kernelized version of GVSM is:

      • The training kernel matrix K(=Dt.D) K2 (mxm)

      • The kernel vector of a new document d vs the training documents : t  K.t (mx1)

      • The initial K could be a polynomial kernel (GVSM on multi-words terms)

    • Variants: One can use

      • a shorter context than the document to compute term-term similarity (term-context matrix)

      • Another measure than the number of co-occurrences to compute the similarity (e.g. Mutual information, …)

    • Can be generalised to Kn (or a weighted combination of K1 K2 …Kn cfr. Diffusion kernels later), but is Kn less and less sparse! Interpretation as sum over paths of length 2n.


Semantic smoothing kernels1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Semantic Smoothing Kernels

  • Can use other term-term similarity matrix than DDt; e.g. a similarity matrix derived from the Wordnet thesaurus, where the similarity between two terms is defined as:

    • the inverse of the length of the path connecting the two terms in the hierarchical hyper/hyponymy tree.

    • A similarity measure for nodes on a tree (feature space indexed by each node n of the tree, with n(term x) if term x is the class represented by n or “under” n), so that the similarity is the number of common ancestors (including the node of the class itself).

  • With semantic smoothing, 2 documents can be similar even if they don’t share common words.


Latent concept kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Latent concept Kernels

  • Basic idea :

F1

terms

terms

terms

terms

terms

Size t

documents

K(d1,d2)=?

Size d

F2

Size k <<t

Concepts space


Latent concept kernels1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Latent concept Kernels

  • k(d1,d2)=(d1)t.Pt.P.(d2),

    • where P is a (linear) projection operator

      • From Term Space

      • to Concept Space

  • Working with (latent) concepts provides:

    • Robustness to polysemy, synonymy, style, …

    • Cross-lingual bridge

    • Natural Dimension Reduction

  • But, how to choose P and how to define (extract) the latent concept space? Ex: Use PCA : the concepts are nothing else than the principal components.


Polysemy and synonymy

ACL-04 Tutorial

Polysemy and Synonymy

polysemy

synonymy

t2

t2

doc1

doc1

Concept axis

Concept axis

doc2

doc2

t1

t1


More formally

ACL-04 Tutorial

More formally …

  • SVD Decomposition of DU(txk)S(kxk)Vt(kxd), where U and V are projection matrices (from term to concept and from concept to document)

  • Kernel Latent Semantic Indexing (SVD decomposition in feature space) :

    • U is formed by the eigenvectors corresponding to the k largest eigenvalues of D.Dt (each column defines a concept by linear combination of terms)

    • V is formed by the eigenvectors corresponding to the k largest eigenvalues of K=DtD

    • S = diag (si) where si2 (i=1,..,k) is the ith largest eigenvalueof K

    • Cfr semantic smoothing with D.Dt replaced U.Ut (new term-term similarity matrix): k(d1,d2)=d1t.(U.Ut).d2

    • As in Kernel GVSM, the completely kernelized version of LSI is: KVS2V’ (=K’s approximation of rank k) and t VV’t (vector of similarities of a new doc), with no computation in the feature space

    • If kn, then latent semantic kernel is identical to the initial kernel


Complementary remarks

ACL-04 Tutorial

Complementary remarks

  • Composition Polynomial kernel + kernel LSI (disjunctive normal form) or Kernel LSI + polynomial kernel (tuples of concepts or conjunctive normal form)

  • GVSM is a particular case with one document = one concept

  • Other decomposition :

    • Random mapping and randomized kernels (Monte-Carlo following some non-uniform distribution; bounds exist to probabilistically ensure that the estimated Gram matrix is e-accurate)

    • Nonnegative matrix factorization D A(txk)S(kxd) [A>0]

    • ICA factorization D A(txk)S(kxd) (kernel ICA)

    • Cfr semantic smoothing with D.Dt replaced by A.At : k(d1,d2)=d1t.(A.At).d2

    • Decompositions coming from multilingual parallel corpora (crosslingual GVSM, crosslingual LSI, CCA)


Why multilingualism helps

ACL-04 Tutorial

Why multilingualism helps …

  • Graphically:

  • Concatenating both representations will force language-independent concept: each language imposes constraints on the other

  • Searching for maximally correlated projections of paired observations (CCA) has a sense, semantically speaking

Terms in L1

Parallel contexts

Terms in L2


Diffusion kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Diffusion Kernels

  • Recursive dual definition of the semantic smoothing:

    K=D’(I+uQ)D

    Q=D(I+vK)D’

    NB. u=v=0  standard BOW; v=0  GVSM

  • Let B= D’D (standard BOW kernel); G=DD’

  • If u=v, The solution is the “Von Neumann diffusion kernel”

    • K=B.(I+uB+u2B2+…)=B(I-uB)-1 and Q=G(I-uG)-1 [only of u<||B||-1]

    • Can be extended, with a faster decay, to exponential diffusion kernel: K=B.exp(uB) and Q=exp(uG)


Graphical interpretation

ACL-04 Tutorial

Graphical Interpretation

  • These diffusion kernels correspond to defining similarities between nodes in a graph, specifying only the myopic view

    Or

Documents

Diffusion kernels corresponds to considering all paths of length 1, 2, 3, 4 … linking 2 nodes and summing the product of local similarities, with different decay strategies

The (weighted) adjacency matrix is the Doc-Term Matrix

Terms

It is in some way similar to KPCA by just “rescaling” the eigenvalues of the basic Kernel matrix (decreasing the lowest ones)

By aggregation, the (weighted) adjacency matrix is the term-term similarity matrix G


Strategies of design2

ACL-04 Tutorial

Strategies of Design

  • Kernel as a way to encode prior information

    • Invariance: synonymy, document length, …

    • Linguistic processing: word normalisation, semantics, stopwords, weighting scheme, …

  • Convolution Kernels: text is a recursively-defined data structure. How to build “global” kernels form local (atomic level) kernels?

  • Generative model-based kernels: the “topology” of the problem will be translated into a kernel function


Sequence kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Sequence kernels

  • Consider a document as:

    • A sequence of characters (string)

    • A sequence of tokens (or stems or lemmas)

    • A paired sequence (POS+lemma)

    • A sequence of concepts

    • A tree (parsing tree)

    • A dependency graph

  • Sequence kernels  order has importance

    • Kernels on string/sequence : counting the subsequences two objects have in common … but various ways of counting

    • Contiguity is necessary (p-spectrum kernels)

    • Contiguity is not necessary (subsequence kernels)

    • Contiguity is penalised (gap-weighted subsequence kernels)

(later)


String and sequence

ACL-04 Tutorial

String and Sequence

  • Just a matter of convention:

    • String matching: implies contiguity

    • Sequence matching : only implies order


P spectrum kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

p-spectrum kernel

  • Features of s = p-spectrum of s = histogram of all (contiguous) substrings of length p

  • Feature space indexed by all elements of Sp

  • fu(s)=number of occurrences of u in s

  • Ex:

    • s=“John loves Mary Smith”

    • t=“Mary Smith loves John”

K(s,t)=1


P spectrum kernels ii

ACL-04 Tutorial

p-spectrum Kernels (II)

  • Naïve implementation:

    • For all p-grams of s, compare equality with the p-grams of t

    • O(p|s||t|)

    • Later, implementation in O(p(|s|+|t|))


All subsequences kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

All-subsequences kernels

  • Feature space indexed by all elements of S*={e}U S U S2U S3U…

  • fu(s)=number of occurrences of u as a (non-contiguous) subsequence of s

  • Explicit computation rapidly infeasible (exponential in |s| even with sparse rep.)

  • Ex:

K=6


Recursive implementation

ACL-04 Tutorial

Recursive implementation

  • Consider the addition of one extra symbol a to s: common subsequences of (sa,t) are either in s or must end with symbol a (in both sa and t).

  • Mathematically,

  • This gives a complexity of O(|s||t|)


Practical implementation dp table

ACL-04 Tutorial

Practical implementation (DP table)

NB: by-product : all k(a,b) for prefixes a of s, b of t


Fixed length subsequence kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Fixed-length subsequence kernels

  • Feature space indexed by all elements of Sp

  • fu(s)=number of occurrences of the p-gram u as a (non-contiguous) subsequence of s

  • Recursive implementation(will create a series of p tables)

  • Complexity: O(p|s||t|) , but we have the k-length subseq. kernels (k<=p) for free  easy to compute k(s,t)=Salkl(s,t)


Gap weighted subsequence kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Gap-weighted subsequence kernels

  • Feature space indexed by all elements of Sp

  • fu(s)=sum of weights of occurrences of the p-gram u as a (non-contiguous) subsequence of s, the weight being length penalizing: llength(u)) [NB: length includes both matching symbols and gaps]

  • Example:

    • D1 : ATCGTAGACTGTC

    • D2 : GACTATGC

    • (D1)CAT = 2l8+2l10and(D2)CAT = l4

    • k(D1,D2)CAT=2l12+2l14

  • Naturally built as a dot product  valid kernel

  • For alphabet of size 80, there are 512000 trigrams

  • For alphabet of size 26, there are 12.106 5-grams


Gap weighted subsequence kernels1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Gap-weighted subsequence kernels

  • Hard to perform explicit expansion and dot-product!

  • Efficient recursive formulation (dynamic programming –like), whose complexity is O(k.|D1|.|D2|)

  • Normalization (doc length independence)


Recursive implementation1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Recursive implementation

  • Defining K’i(s,t) as Ki(s,t), but the occurrences are weighted by the length to the end of the string (s)

  • 3.p DP tables must be built and maintained

  • As before, as by-product, all gap-weighted k-grams kernels, with k<=p so that any linear combination k(s,t)=Salkl(s,t)easy to compute


Word sequence kernels i

ACL-04 Tutorial

Word Sequence Kernels (I)

  • Here “words” are considered as symbols

    • Meaningful symbols  more relevant matching

    • Linguistic preprocessing can be applied to improve performance

    • Shorter sequence sizes  improved computation time

    • But increased sparsity (documents are more : “orthogonal”)

    • Intermediate step: syllable kernel (indirectly realizes some low-level stemming and morphological decomposition)

  • Motivation : the noisy stemming hypothesis (important N-grams approximate stems), confirmed experimentally in a categorization task


Word sequence kernels ii

ACL-04 Tutorial

Word Sequence Kernels (II)

  • Link between Word Sequence Kernels and other methods:

    • For k=1, WSK is equivalent to basic “Bag Of Words” approach

    • For l=1, close relation to polynomial kernel of degree k, WSK takes order into account

  • Extension of WSK:

    • Symbol dependant decay factors (way to introduce IDF concept, dependence on the POS, stop words)

    • Different decay factors for gaps and matches (e.g. lnoun<ladj when gap; lnoun>ladj when match)

    • Soft matching of symbols (e.g. based on thesaurus, or on dictionary if we want cross-lingual kernels)


Recursive equations for variants

ACL-04 Tutorial

Recursive equations for variants

  • It is obvious to adapt recursive equations, without increasing complexity

    Or, for soft matching (bi,j: elementary symbol kernel):


Trie based kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Trie-based kernels

  • An alternative to DP based on string matching techniques

  • TRIE= Retrieval Tree (cfr. Prefix tree) = tree whose internal nodes have their children indexed by S.

  • Suppose F= Sp : the leaves of a complete p-trie are the indices of the feature space

  • Basic algorithm:

    • Generate all substrings s(i:j) satisfying initial criteria; idem for t.

    • Distribute the s-associated list down from root to leave (depth-first)

    • Distribute the t-associated list down from root to leave taking into account the distribution of s-list (pruning)

    • Compute the product at the leaves and sum over the leaves

  • Key points: in steps (2) and (3), not all the leaves will be populated (else complexity would be O(| Sp|) … you need not build the trie explicitly!


Some digression to learning method

ACL-04 Tutorial

Some digression to learning method

  • Kernel-based learning algorithms (ex. SVM, kernel perceptron, …) result in model of the form f(Sai yi k(x, xi)) or f((Sai yi f(xi))•f(x))

  • This suggests efficient computation by pre-storing (« pre-compiling ») the weighted TRIE Sai yi f(xi) (number of occurrences are weighted by ai yi and summed up.

  • This « pre-compilation » trick is often possible with a lot of convolution kernels.


Example 1 p spectrum

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 1 – p-spectrum

  • p=2

  • S=a a b a  {aa, ab, ba}

  • T=b a b a b b  {ba, ab, ba, ab, bb}

Complexity: O(p(|s|+|t|))

b

a

S: {aa, ab} T: {ab, ab}

S: {ba} T:{ba,ba,bb}

a

a

b

b

S: 1 T:2

S:1 T:2

S: 1

 k=2*1+2*1=4


Example 2 p m mismatch kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 2: (p,m)-mismatch kernels

  • Feature space indexed by all elements of Sp

  • fu(s)=number of p-grams (substrings) of s that differ form u by at most m symbols

  • See example on next slide (p=2; m=1)

  • Complexity O(pm+1|S|m(|s|+|t|))

  • Can be easily extended by using a semantic (local) dissimilarity matrix ba,b, to fu(s)=number of p-grams (substrings) of s that differ form u by a total dissimilarity not larger than some threshold (total=sum)


Example 2 illustration

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 2: illustration

b

a

S: {aa:0, ab:0, ba:1} T: {ab:0, ab:0, ba:1, ba:1, bb:1}

S: {ba:0, aa:1, ab:1} T:{ba:0,ba:0,bb:0, ab:1,ab:1}

a

a

b

b

k=3*4+2*3+2*3+2*5=34

S: {aa:0, ab:1, ba:1} T:{ab:1,ab:1,ba:1,ba:1}

S:{ba:0,aa:1} T:{ba:0,ba:0,bb:1}

S: {aa:1, ab:0}

T:{ab:0,ab:0,bb:1}

S:{ba:1,ab:1} T:{ba:1,ba:1,bb:0,ab:1,ab:1}


Example 3 restricted gap weighted kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 3: restricted gap-weighted kernel

  • Feature space indexed by all elements of Sp

  • fu(s)=sum of weights of occurrences of p-gram u as a (non-contiguous) subsequence of s, provided that u occurs with at most m gaps, the weight being gap penalizing: lgap(u))

  • For small l, restrict m to 2 or even 1 is a reasonable approximation of the full gap-weighted subsequence kernel

  • Cfr. Previous algorithms but generate all (p+m) substrings at the initial phase.

  • Complexity O((p+m)m(|s|+|t|))

  • If m is too large, DP is more efficient


Example 3 illustration

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 3 : illustration

  • p=2 ; m=1

  • S=a a b a  {aab,aba}

  • T=b a b a a b  {bab,aba,baa,aab}

b

S: {aab:0, aba:0} T: {aba:0, aab:0}

a

 k=(1+l) (1+l)+(1+l) (1+l)

a

a

b

b

S:{aab:0; aba:1} T:{aab:0; aba:1}

S:{aab:1; aba:0} T:{aab:1; aba:0}


Mini dynamic programming

ACL-04 Tutorial

Mini Dynamic Programming

  • Imagine the processing of substring aaa in the previous example

  • In the depth-first traversal, to assign a unique value at the leave (when more than 1 way), Dynamic Programming must be used

  • Build a small DP table [ size (p+m)xp ] to find the least penalised way.


Tree kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Tree Kernels

  • Application: categorization [one doc=one tree], parsing (desambiguation) [one doc = multiple trees]

  • Tree kernels constitute a particular case of more general kernels defined on discrete structure (convolution kernels). Intuitively, the philosophy is

    • to split the structured objects in parts,

    • to define a kernel on the “atoms” and a way to recursively combine kernel over parts to get the kernel over the whole.


Tree seen as string

ACL-04 Tutorial

Tree seen as String

  • One could use our string kernels by re-encoding the tree as a string, using extra characters (cfr. LISP representation of trees)

  • Ex:

VP

Encoded as: [VP [V [loves]] [N [Mary]]]

V

N

loves

Mary

Restrict substrings to subtrees by imposing constraints on the number and position of ‘[‘ and ‘]’


Fundaments of tree kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Fundaments of Tree kernels

  • Feature space definition: one feature for each possible proper subtree in the training data; feature value = number of occurences

  • A subtree is defined as any part of the tree which includes more than one node, with the restriction there is no “partial” rule production allowed.


Tree kernels example

ACL-04 Tutorial

Tree Kernels : example

S

  • Example :

N

NP

VP

S

Mary

VP

VP

NP

VP

V

N

V

N

John

V

N

loves

loves

Mary

loves

Mary

VP

… a few among the many subtrees of this tree!

A Parse Tree

V

N


Tree kernels algorithm

ACL-04 Tutorial

Tree Kernels : algorithm

  • Kernel = dot product in this high dimensional feature space

  • Once again, there is an efficient recursive algorithm (in polynomial time, not exponential!)

  • Basically, it compares the production of all possible pairs of nodes (n1,n2) (n1T1, n2  T2); if the production is the same, the number of common subtrees routed at both n1 and n2 is computed recursively, considering the number of common subtrees routed at the common children

  • Formally, let kco-rooted(n1,n2)=number of common subtrees rooted at both n1 and n2


All sub tree kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

All sub-tree kernel

  • Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=0 if n1 or n2 is a leave

  • Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=0 if n1 and n2 have different production or, if labeled, different label

  • Else Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=

  • “Production” is left intentionally ambiguous to both include unlabelled tree and labeled tree

  • Complexity s O(|T1|.|T2|)


Illustration

ACL-04 Tutorial

Illustration

a

i

b

c

j

k

K=2

d

f

g

e

h


Tree kernels remarks

ACL-04 Tutorial

Tree kernels : remarks

  • Even with “cosine” normalisation, the kernel remains “to peaked” (influence of larger structure feature … which grow exponentially)

    • Either, restrict to subtrees up to depth p

    • Either, downweight larger structure feature by a decay factor


D restricted tree kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

d-restricted Tree Kernel

  • Stores d DP tables Kco-rooted(n1,n2,p) p=1,…,d

  • Kco-rooted(n1,n2,p)=P(1+ Kco-rooted(ci(n1),ci(n2),p-1))

  • With initial Kco-rooted(n1,n2,1)=1 if n1,n2 same production

  • Complexity is O(p.|T1|.|T2|)


Depth penalised tree kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

Depth-penalised Tree Kernel

  • Else Kco-rooted(n1,n2)= l2

  • Corresponds to weight each (implicit) feature by lsize(subtree) where size=number of (non-terminating) nodes


Variant for labeled ordered tree

ACL-04 Tutorial

Variant for labeled ordered tree

  • Example: dealing with html/xml documents

  • Extension to deal with:

    • Partially equal production

    • Children with same labels

    • … but order is important

The subtree

n1

n2

A B

A A B B A

A B C

is common 4 times


Labeled order tree kernel algo

ACL-04 Tutorial

Labeled Order Tree Kernel : algo

  • Actually, two-dimensional dynamic programming (vertical and horizontal)

    Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=0 if n1,n2 different labels; else

    Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=S(nc(n1),nc(n2)) [number of subtrees up to …]

    S(i,j)=S(i-1,j)+S(i,j-1)-S(i-1,j-1)+S(i-1,j-1)* Kco-rooted(ch(n1,i),ch(n2,j))

  • Complexity: O(|T1|.|T2|.nc(T1).nc(T2))

  • Easy extension to allow label mutation by introducing sim(label(a),label(b)) PD matrix


Dependency graph kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

Dependency Graph Kernel

with

A sub-graph is a connected part with at least two word (and the labeled edge)

PP-obj

telescope

*

det

the

saw

sub

PP

obj

saw

with

man

obj

I

PP-obj

telescope

man

det

det

the

det

the

the


Dependency graph kernel1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Dependency Graph Kernel

  • Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=0 if n1 or n2 has no child

  • Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=0 if n1 and n2 have different label

  • Else Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=


Paired sequence kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

Paired sequence kernel

A subsequence is a sub-sequence of states, with or without the associated word

Det

Noun

Verb

States (TAG)

Det

Noun

Verb

Det

Noun

The

saw

The

words

man

man


Paired sequence kernel1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Paired sequence kernel

  • If tag(n1)=tag(n2) AND tag(next(n1))=tag(next(n2))

    • Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=(1+x)*(1+y+ Kco-rooted(next(n1),next(n2)))

    • where x=1 if word(n1)=word(n2), =0 else

    • y=1 if word(next(n1))=word(next(n2)), =0 else

  • Else Kco-rooted(n1,n2)=0

A

A

B

B

B

B

A

A

B

A

=

+

+

+

c

d

c

c

d

d


Graph kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Graph Kernels

  • General case:

    • Directed

    • Labels on both vertex and edges

    • Loops and cycles are allowed (not in all algorithms)

  • Particular cases easily derived from the general one:

    • Non-directed

    • No label on edge, no label on vertex


Theoretical issues

ACL-04 Tutorial

Theoretical issues

  • To design a kernel taking the whole graph structure into account amounts to build a complete graph kernel that distinguishes between 2 graphs only if they are not isomorphic

  • Complete graph kernel design is theoretically possible … but practically infeasible (NP-complex)

  • Approximations are therefore necessary:

    • Common local subtrees kernels

    • Common (label) walk kernels (most popular)


Graph kernels based on common walks

ACL-04 Tutorial

Graph kernels based on Common Walks

  • Walk = (possibly infinite) sequence of labels obtained by following edges on the graph

  • Path = walk with no vertex visited twice

  • Important concept: direct product of two graphs G1xG2

    • V(G1xG2)={(v1,v2), v1 and v2: same labels)

    • E(G1xG2)={(e1,e2): e1, e2: same labels, p(e1) and p(e2) same labels, n(e1) and n(e2) same labels}

e

n(e)

p(e)


Direct product of graphs

ACL-04 Tutorial

A

A

A

A

A

A

=

=

X

X

Direct Product of Graphs

  • Examples

C

B

B

B

B

B

C

B

A

A

A


Kernel computation

ACL-04 Tutorial

Kernel Computation

  • Feature space: indexed by all possible walks (of length 1, 2, 3, …n, possibly )

  • Feature value: sum of number of occurrences, weighted by function l(size of the walk)

  • Theorem: common walks on G1 and G2 are the walks of G1xG2 (this is not true for path!)

  • So, K(G1,G2)= S(over all walks g) l(size of g)) (PD kernel)

  • Choice of the function l will ensure convergence of the kernel : typically bs or bs/s! where s=size of g.

  • Walks of (G1xG2) are obtained by the power series of the adjacency matrix (closed form if the series converges) – cfr. Our discussion about diffusion kernels

  • Complexity: O(|V1|.|V2|.|A(V1)|.|A(V2)|)


Remark

ACL-04 Tutorial

Remark

  • This kind of kernel is unable to make the distinction between

  • Common subtree kernels allow to overcome this limitation (locally unfold the graph as a tree)

B

A

B

A

A

B

B


Variant random walk kernel

ACL-04 Tutorial

Variant: Random Walk Kernel

  • Doesn’t (explicitly) make use of the direct product of the graphs

  • Directly deal with walk up to length 

  • Easy extension to weighted graph by the « random walk » formalism

  • Actualy, nearly equivalent to the previous approach (… and same complexity)

  • Some reminiscence of PageRank, …approaches


Random walk graph kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Random Walk Graph Kernels

  • Where kco-root(n1,n2)= sum of probabilities of common walks starting from both n1 and n2

  • Very local view: kco-root(n1,n2)= I(n1,n2), wtih I(n1,n2)=1 only if n1 and n2 same labels

  • Recursively defined (cfr. Diffusion kernels) as


Random walk kernels end

ACL-04 Tutorial

Random Walk Kernels (end)

  • This corresponds to random walks with a probability of stopping =(1-l) at each stage and a uniform (or non-uniform) distribution when choosing an edge

  • Matricially, the vector of kco-root(n1,n2), noted as k, can be written k=(1-l)k0+lB.k (where B directly derives from the adjacency matrices and has size |V1|.|V2| x |V1|.|V2|)

  • So, kernel computation amount to … matrix inversion: k=(1-l)(I-lB)-1ko …often solved iteratively (back to the recursice formulation)


Strategies of design3

ACL-04 Tutorial

Strategies of Design

  • Kernel as a way to encode prior information

    • Invariance: synonymy, document length, …

    • Linguistic processing: word normalisation, semantics, stopwords, weighting scheme, …

  • Convolution Kernels: text is a recursively-defined data structure. How to build “global” kernels form local (atomic level) kernels?

  • Generative model-based kernels: the “topology” of the problem will be translated into a kernel function


Marginalised conditional independence kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Marginalised – Conditional Independence Kernels

  • Assume a family of models M (with prior p0(m) on each model) [finite or countably infinite]

  • each model m gives P(x|m)

  • Feature space indexed by models: x P(x|m)

  • Then, assuming conditional independence, the joint probability is given by

  • This defines a valid probability-kernel (CI implies PD kernel), by marginalising over m. Indeed, the gram matrix is K=P.diag(P0).P’ (some reminiscence of latent concept kernels)


Remind

ACL-04 Tutorial

Remind

  • This family of strategies brings you the additional advantage of using all your unlabeled training data to design more problem-adapted kernels

  • They constitute a natural and elegant way of solving semi-supervised problems (mix of labelled and unlabelled data)


Example 1 plsa kernel somewhat artificial

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 1: PLSA-kernel (somewhat artificial)

  • Probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis provides a generative model of both documents and words in a corpus:

  • P(d,w)=SP(c)P(d|c)P(w|c)

  • Assuming that the topics is the model, you can identify the models P(d|c) and P(c)

  • Then use marginalised kernels

d

c

w


Example 2 hmm generating fixed length strings

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 2: HMM generating fixed-length strings

  • The generative models of a string s (of length n) is given by an HMM, represented by (A is the set of states)

  • Then

  • With efficient recursive (DP) implementation in O(n|A|2)

h1

h2

h3

hn

s1

s2

s3

sn


One step further marginalised kernels with latent variable models

ACL-04 Tutorial

One step further: marginalised kernels with latent variable models

  • Assume you both know the visible (x) and the latent (h) variables and want to impose the joint kernel kz((x,h),(x’,h’))

  • This is more flexible than previous approach for which kz((x,h),(x’,h’)) is automatically 0 if hh’

  • Then the kernel is obtained by marginalising (averaging) over the latent variables:


Marginalised latent kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Marginalised latent kernels

  • The posterior p(h|x) are given by the generative model (using Bayes rule)

  • This is an elegant way of coupling generative models and kernel methods; the joint kernel kz allows to introduce domain (user) knowledge

  • Intuition: learning with such kernels will perform well if the class variable is contained as a latent variable of the probability model (as good as the corresponding MAP decision)

  • Basic key feature: when computing the similarity between two documents, the same word (x) can be weighted differently depending on the context (h) [title, development, conclusion]


Examples of marginalised latent kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Examples of Marginalised Latent Kernels

  • Gaussian mixture: p(x)=Sp(h)N(x|h,mh,Ah)

    • Choosing kz((x,h),(x’,h’))=xtAhx’ if h=h’ (0 else) … this corresponds to the local Mahalanobis intra-cluster distance

    • Then k(x,x’)= Sp(x|h)p(x’|h)p2(h) xtAhx’ /p(x) /p(x’)

  • Contextual BOW kernel:

    • Let x,x’ be two symbol sequences corresponding to sequence h,h’ of hidden states

    • We can decide to count common symbol occurrences only if appearing in the same context (given h and h’ sequences, this is the standard BOW kernel restricted to common states; then the results are summed and weighted by the posteriors.



Fisher kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Fisher Kernels

  • Assume you have only 1 model

    • Marginalised kernel give you little information: only one feature: P(x|m)

    • To exploit much, the model must be “flexible”, so that we can measure how it adapts to individual items  we require a “smoothly” parametrised model

    • Link with previous approach: locally perturbed models constitute our family of models, but dimF=number of parameters

  • More formally, let P(x|q0) be the generative model (q0 is typically found by max likelihood); the gradient reflects how the model will be changed to accommodate the new point x (NB. In practice the loglikelihood is used)


Fisher kernel formally

ACL-04 Tutorial

Fisher Kernel : formally

  • Two objects are similar if they require similar adaptation of the parameters or, in other words, if they stretch the model in the same direction:

    K(x,y)=

    Where IM is the Fisher Information Matrix


On the fisher information matrix

ACL-04 Tutorial

On the Fisher Information Matrix

  • The FI matrix gives some non-euclidian, topological-dependant dot-product

  • It also provides invariance to any smooth invertible reparametrisation

  • Can be approximated by the empirical covariance on the training data points

  • But, it can be shown that it increase the risk of amplifying noise if some parameters are not relevant

  • Practically, IM is taken as I.


Example 1 language model

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 1 : Language model

  • Language models can improve k-spectrum kernels

  • Language model is a generative model: p(wn|wn-k…wn-1) are the parameters

  • The likelihood of s=

  • The gradient of the log-likelihood with respect to parameter uv is the number of occurrences of uv in s divided by p(uv)


String kernels and fisher kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

String kernels and Fisher Kernels

  • Standard p-spectrum kernel corresponds to Fisher Kernel with p-stage Markov process, with uniform distribution for p(uv) (=1/|S|) … which is the least informative parameter setting

  • Similarly, the gap weighted subsequence kernel is the Fisher Kernel of a generalized k-stage Markov process with decay factor l and uniform p(uv)(any subsequence of length (k-1) from the beginning of the document contributes to explaining the next symbol, with a gap-penalizing weight)


Example 2 plsa fisher kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Example 2 : PLSA-Fisher Kernels

  • An example : Fisher kernel for PLSA improves the standard BOW kernel

    • where k1(d1,d2) is a measure of how much d1 and d2 share the same latent concepts (synonymy is taken into account)

    • where k2(d1,d2) is the traditional inner product of common term frequencies, but weighted by the degree to which these terms belong to the same latent concept (polysemy is taken into account)


Link between fisher kernels and marginalised latent variable kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

Link between Fisher Kernels and Marginalised Latent Variable Kernels

  • Assume a generative model of the form:

    • P(x)=Sp(x,h|q) (latent variable model)

  • Then the Fisher Kernel can be rewritten as

    with a particular form of kz

  • Some will argue that

    • Fisher Kernels are better, as kz is theoretically founded

    • MLV Kernels are better, because of the flexibility of kz


Applications of km in nlp

ACL-04 Tutorial

Applications of KM in NLP

  • Document categorization and filtering

  • Event Detection and Tracking

  • Chunking and Segmentation

  • Dependency parsing

  • POS-tagging

  • Named Entity Recognition

  • Information Extraction

  • Others: Word sense disambiguation, Japanese word segmentation, …


General ideas 1

ACL-04 Tutorial

General Ideas (1)

  • Consider generic NLP tasks such as tagging (POS, NE, chunking, …) or parsing (syntactical parsing, …)

  • Kernels defined for structures such as paired sequences (tagging) and trees (parsing) ; can be easily extended to weighted (stochastic) structures (probabilities given by HMM, PCFG,…)

  • Goal: instead of finding the most plausible analysis by building a generative model, define kernels and use a learning method (classifier) to discover the correct analysis, … which necessitates training examples

  • Advantages: avoid to rely on restrictive assumptions (indepedence, restriction to low order information, …), take into account larger substructure by efficient kernels


General ideas 2

ACL-04 Tutorial

General ideas (2)

  • Methodolgy often envolves transforming the original problam into a classification problem or a ranking problem

  • Exemple: parsing problem transformed as ranking

    • Sentence s{x1,x2,x3,…,xn} candidate parsing trees, obtained by CFG or top-n PCFG

    • Find a ranking model which outputs a plausibility score W•f(xi)

    • Ideally, for each sentence, W•f(x1)> W•f(xi) i=2,…,n

    • This is the primal formulation (not practical)


Ranking problem

ACL-04 Tutorial

Ranking problem

Correct trees for all training sentences

f2

W (optimal)

x

x

x

Incorrect trees for all training sentences

x

x

x

Non-optimal W

x

f1


Ranking problem dual algo

ACL-04 Tutorial

Ranking problem Dual Algo

  • This is a problem very close to classification

  • The only difference: origin has no importance: we can work with relative values f(xi)- f(x1) instead

  • Dual formulation: W=Sai,j[f(xi,j)- f(x1,j)] (ai,j :dual parameters)

  • Decision output is now= Sai,j[k(x,x1,j)-k(x,xi,j)]

  • Dual parameters are obtained by margin maximisation (SVM) or simple udating rule such as ai,j = ai,j +1 if W•f(x1,j)< W•f(xi,j) (this is the dual formulation of the Perceptron algorithm)


Typical results

ACL-04 Tutorial

Typical Results

  • Based on the coupling (efficient kernel + margin-based learning): the coupling is known

    • To have good generalisation properties, both theoretically and experimentally

    • To overcome the « curse of dimensionality » problem in high dimensional feature space

  • Margin-based kernel method vs PCFG for parsing the Penn TreeBank ATIS corpus: 22% increase in accuracy

  • Other learning frameworks such as boosting, MRF are primal

    • Having the same features as in Kernel methods is prohibitive

    • Choice of good features is critical


Slowness remains the main issue

ACL-04 Tutorial

Slowness remains the main issue!

  • Slowness during learning (typically SVM)

    • Circumvented by heuristics in SVM (caching, linear expansion, …)

    • Use of low-cost learning method such as the Voted Perceptron (same as perceptron with storage of intermediate « models » and weighted vote)

  • Slowness during the classification step (applying the learned model to new examples to take a decision)

    • Use of efficient representation (inverted index, a posteriori expansion of the main features to get a linear model so that the decision function is computed in linear time, and is no longer quadratic in document size)

    • Some « pre-compilation » of the Support Vector solution is often possible

    • Revision Learning: Efficient co-working between standard method (ex. HMM for tagging) and SVM (used only to correct errors of HMM: binary problem instead of complex one-vs-n problem)


Document categorization filtering

ACL-04 Tutorial

Document Categorization & Filtering

  • Classification task

    • Classes = topics

    • Or Class = relevant / not relevant (filtering)

  • Typical corpus: 30.000 features , 10.000 training documents


Svm for pos tagging

ACL-04 Tutorial

SVM for POS Tagging

  • POS tagging is a multiclass classification problem

  • Typical Feature Vector (for unknown words):

    • Surrounding context: words of both sides

    • Morphologic info: pre- and suffixes, existence of capitals, numerals, …

    • POS tags of preceding words (previous decisions)

  • Results on the Penn Treebank WSJ corpus :

    • TnT (second-order HMM): 96.62 % (F-1 measure)

    • SVM (1-vs-rest): 97.11%

    • Revision learning: 96.60%


Svm for chunk identification

ACL-04 Tutorial

SVM for Chunk Identification

  • Each word has to be tagged with a chunk label (combination IBO / chunk type). E.g. I-NP, B-NP, …

  • This can be seen as a classification problem with typically 20 categories (multiclass problem – solved by one-vs-rest or pairwise classification and max or majority voting - Kx(K-1)/2 classifiers)

  • Typical feature vector: surrounding context (word and POS-tag) and (estimated) chunk labels of previous words

  • Results on WSJ corpus (section 15-19 as training; section 20 as test):

    • SVM: 93.84%

    • Combination (weighted vote) of SVM with different input representations and directions: 94.22%


Named entity recognition

ACL-04 Tutorial

Named Entity Recognition

  • Each word has to be tagged with a combination of entity label (8 categories) and 4 sub-tags (B,I,E,S) E.g. Company-B, Person-S, …

  • This can be seen as a classification problem with typically 33 categories (multiclass problem – solved by one-vs-rest or pairwise classification and max or majority voting)

  • Typical feature vector: surrounding context (word and POS-tag), character type (in Japanese)

  • Ensures consistency among word classes by Viterbi search (SVM’ scores are transformed into probabilities)

  • Results on IREX data set (‘CRL’ as training; ‘General’ as test):

    • RG+DT (rule-based): 86% F1

    • SVM: 90% F1


Svm for word sense disambiguation

ACL-04 Tutorial

SVM for Word Sense Disambiguation

  • Can be considered as a classification task (choose between some predefined senses)

  • NB. One (multiclass) classifier for each ambiguous word

  • Typical Feature Vector:

    • Surrounding context (words and POS tags)

    • Presence/absence of focus-specific keywords in a wider context

  • As usual in NLP problems, few training examples and many features

  • On the 1998 Senseval competition Corpus, SVM has an average rank of 2.3 (in competition with 8 other learning algorithms on about 30 ambiguous words)


Recent perspectives

ACL-04 Tutorial

Recent Perspectives

  • Rational Kernels

    • Weighted Finite SateTransducer representation (and computation) of kernels

    • Can be applied to compute kernels on variable-length sequences and on weighted automata

  • HDAG Kernels (tomorrow presentation of Suzuki and co-workers)

    • Kernels defined on Hierarchical Directed Acyclic Graph (general structure encompassing numerous structures found in NLP)


Rational kernels i

ACL-04 Tutorial

Rational Kernels (I)

  • Reminder:

    • FSA accepts a set a strings x

    • A string can be directly represented by an automaton

    • WFST associates to each pair of strings (x,y) a weight [ T ](x,y) given by the « sum » over all « succesful paths » (accepts x in input, emits y in output, starts from an initial state and ends in a final state) of the weights of the path (the « product » of the transition weights)

  • A string kernel is rational if there exists a WFST T and a function y such that k(x,y)=y([T](x,y))


Rational kernels ii

ACL-04 Tutorial

Rational Kernels (II)

  • A rational kernel will define a PD (valid) kernel iif T can be decomposed as UoU-1 (U-1 is obtained by swapping input/output labels … some kind of transposition; « o » is the composition operator)

  • Indeed, by definition of composition, neglecting y, K(x,y)=Sz[U](x,z)*[U](y,z) … corresponding to A*At (sum and product are defined over a semi-ring)

  • Kernel computation y([T](x,y) involves

    • Transducer composition ((XoU)o(U-1oY))

    • Shortest distance algo to find y([T](x,y)

  • Using « failure functions », complexity is O(|x|+|y|)

  • P-spectrum kernels and the gap-weighted string kernels can be expressed as rational transducer (the elementary « U » transducer is some « counting transducer », automatically outputting weighted substrings of x


Hdag kernels

ACL-04 Tutorial

HDAG Kernels

  • Convolution kernels applied to HDAG, ie. a mix of tree and DAG (nodes in a DAG can themselves be a DAG … but edges connecting « non-brother » nodes are not taken into account

  • Can handle hierarchical chunk structure, dependency relations, attributes (labels such as POS, type of chunk, type of entity, …) associated with a node at whatever level

  • Presented in details tomorrow


Conclusions

ACL-04 Tutorial

Conclusions

  • If you can only remember 2 principles after this session, these should be:

    • Kernel methods are modular

      • The KERNEL, unique interface with your data, incorporating the structure, the underlying semantics, and other prior knowledge, with a strong emphasis on efficient computation while working with an (implicit) very rich representation

      • The General learning algorithm with robustness properties based on both the dual formulation and margin properties

    • Successes in NLP come from both origines

      • Kernel exploiting the particular structures of NLP entities

      • NLP tasks reformulated as (typically) classification or ranking tasks, enabling general robust kernel-based learning algorithms to be used.


Bibliography 1

ACL-04 Tutorial

Bibliography (1)

  • Books on Kernel Methods (general):

    • J. Shawe-Taylor and N. Cristianini , Kernel Methods for Pattern Analysis, Cambridge University Press, 2004  

    • N. Cristianini and J. Shawe-Taylor, An Introduction to Support Vector Machines, Cambridge University Press, 2000  

    • B. Schölkopf, C. Burges, and A.J. Smola, Advances in Kernel Methods – Support Vector Learning, MIT Press, 1999  

    • B. Schölkopf and A.J. Smola, Learning with Kernels, MIT Press, 2001  

    • V. N. Vapnik, Statiscal Learning Theory, J. Wiley & Sons, 1998

  • Web Sites:

    • www.kernel-machines.org

    • www.support-vector.net

    • www.kernel-methods.net

    • www.euro-kermit.org


Bibliography 2

ACL-04 Tutorial

Bibliography (2)

  • General Principles governing kernel design [Sha01,Tak03]

  • Kernels built from data [Cri02a,Kwo03]

  • Kernels for texts – Prior information encoding

    • BOW kernels and linguistic enhancements: [Can02, Joa98, Joa99, Leo02]

    • Semantic Smoothing Kernels: [Can02, Sio00]

    • Latent Concept Kernels: [Can02, Cri02b, Kol00, Sch98]

    • Multilingual Kernels: [Can02, Dum97, Vin02]

    • Diffusion Kernels: [Kan02a, Kan02b, Kon02, Smo03]


Bibliography 3

ACL-04 Tutorial

Bibliography (3)

  • Kernels for Text – Convolution Kernels [Hau99, Wat99]

    • String and sequence kernels: [Can03, Les02, Les03a, Les03b, Lod01, Lod02, Vis02]

    • Tree Kernels: [Col01, Col02]

    • Graph Kernels: [Gar02a, Gar02b, Kas02a, Kas02b, Kas03, Ram03, Suz03a]

    • Kernels defined on other NLP structures: [Col01, Col02, Cor03, Gar02a, Gar03, Kas02b, Suz03b]

  • Kernels for Text – Generative-model Based

    • Fisher Kernels: [Hof01, Jaa99a, Jaa99b, Sau02, Sio02]

    • Other approaches: [Alt03, Tsu02a, Tsu02b]


Bibliography 4

ACL-04 Tutorial

Bibliography (4)

  • Particular Applications in NLP

    • Categorisation:[Dru99, Joa01, Man01, Tak01, Ton01,Yan99]

    • WSD: [Zav00]

    • Chunking: [Kud00, Kud01]

    • POS-tagging: [Nak01, Nak02, Zav00]

    • Entity Extraction: [Iso02]

    • Relation Extraction: [Cum03, Zel02]


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