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Refining Your Reading Workshop. Session #7 – Conferencing . Agenda. Finish strategy groups (slide 17) Conferencing – the What and the Why Types of conferences and logistics Using conferencing to inform your instruction Conferencing records/notebooks Conferencing Tips.

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refining your reading workshop

Refining Your Reading Workshop

Session #7 – Conferencing

agenda
Agenda
  • Finish strategy groups (slide 17)
  • Conferencing – the What and the Why
  • Types of conferences and logistics
  • Using conferencing to inform your instruction
  • Conferencing records/notebooks
  • Conferencing Tips
slide3

One on one meetings are the ultimate confidence builders for students. They are especially effective as follow up to instruction, when students practice a strategy. Your undivided attention to each child makes them feel that you care about their learning and will try to help them improve and understand. (Robb, 1998 7-7)

conferencing is assessing before teaching
Conferencing is……….Assessing Before Teaching
  • The prescriptive cookbook

nature of many reading

programs create the illusion

that we can teach without

assessing for ourselves what

each of our students need

and then plan instruction to

meet those needs.

  • We need to realize that teaching must be based on

more than a generic, one-size-fits-all program.

what is an independent reading conference
What is an independent reading conference?
  • teacher works one-on-one with a student

to teach the reader what s/he needs to learn

about reading.

  • The teacher assesses (researches) what the

student needs to learn, decides what to teach

the student and then teaches the reader.

  • Some people think of an Independent reading conference as a “private lesson.”
dual role of reading conferences
Dual role of reading conferences
  • Reading Surgery

- Teach the reader, not the text

  • Support Curriculum

- Coach student to apply strategy taught in

Mini-Lessons

what is essential
What is essential?
  • Conversational tone
  • Consistency
  • Motivation- develop identity as a reader
  • Research, Decide, Teach (RDT,R) and record
  • Teach the reader, not the book
conference goals for the teacher
Conference goals for the teacher
  • To coach the student to think actively
  • To assess what the student knows and

needs to learn

  • To teach the reader
  • To motivate the student to read more and

to apply the strategies taught

conferencing goals for the student
Conferencing goals for the student
  • To apply reading strategies.
  • To develop metacognitive skills
  • To talk about books in a variety of ways, (e.g. author’s craft, character development, preferences).
four part conference structure
Four Part Conference Structure

Research

- What does the student know?

- What does the student need to learn?

Decide

- Select 1-2 things the student is ready to learn next.

Teach

- Explain and model the strategy

And Record

- Record what you taught and expect student to

practice for follow-up at next conference.

conferring with early readers1
Conferring With Early Readers

Early readers have an independent/instructional level between Level A and Level F. (Gr.K-1)

Early readers:

•rely heavily on picture cues

• rely on pattern

• developing high frequency words

starting a book
Starting a book.

What does the student know about self as a

reader?

  • Tell me how you chose this book.
  • Have you read any ____ books before?
  • How do you know this is a “just right” book?
  • What kinds of books do you like to read?
  • What do you do before you read a book?
middle of the book
Middle of the book.

Is the student actively engaged and applying

strategies as needed?

  • Read a bit of the story to me.
  • Do a quick running record to analyze strategy use.
  • What is happening in the story so far?
  • What do you think might happen next?
  • Tell me about the characters.
end of the book
End of the book.

Is the student thinking beyond the text?

  • What do you think about the story?
  • What was your favorite part? Why?
  • Did you make any connections to the story?
  • Retell what happened in the story.
  • What strategies did you use as a reader?
  • What was your favorite part of the story?
  • What will you read next?
video of primary
Video of primary

Joy of Conferring

- Preston – fluency and rereading

- Jack – Decoding and sight words

conferring with transitional readers1
Conferring with Transitional Readers

Transitional Readers have

an instructional reading

levels J-M. (Gr. 1-2)

Transitional readers are

  • beginning to integrate cueing systems.
  • Developing understanding

of plot, characters, simple

literary elements.

starting a book1
Starting a book.

What does the student know about self as a

reader?

  • Tell me how you chose this book.
  • Have you read any other books by this author, series?
  • How do you know this is a “just right” book?
  • What kinds of books and topics do you like to read?
  • What do you do before you read a book?
middle of a book
Middle of a book.

Is the student engaged in purposeful reading? Is the student monitoring for meaning and using a variety of strategies?

  • How did you get back into the story from yesterday?
  • What is happening in the story now? Earlier?
  • Tell me about the character. Did the character change?
  • Take me to that part of the story.
  • Was there a part of the story that was confusing?
  • Whatdid you do to help yourself as a reader?
end of the book1
End of the book.

Is the student thinking beyond the text?

  • What do you think about the book?
  • Was it what you expected? Did you want it to be
  • different?
  • Did you make any connections?
  • What did you learn about yourself as a reader?
  • Would you recommend this book? To whom?
  • What do you plan to read next?
  • What goals do you have for yourself as a reader?
what does retelling involve
What Does Retelling Involve?
  • The teacher asks the child to tell about what he or she has read.
  • Children who are new to retelling may attempt to retell the entire text.
  • The teacher needs to explain that they needn’t tell the whole story, just the main things that happened.
difficulty in the retelling process
Difficulty in the Retelling Process
  • The book may be too hard.
  • It may have taken too many days to complete.
  • They may need to learn more comprehension strategies to handle longer text.

OR -- they may need a clearer explanation of your expectations.

retellings can provide both general and specific information
Retellings Can Provide Both Generaland Specific Information
  • Understanding of the story elements:

– Setting

– Characters

– Main events

– Problem

– Resolution

  • Specific details
  • References to the text
  • Connections with the text
what does retelling involve1
What Does Retelling Involve?
  • The teacher asks the child to tell about what he or she has read.
  • Children who are new to retelling may attempt to retell the entire text.
  • The teacher needs to explain that they needn’t tell the whole story, just the main things that happened.
page by page recounts
Page by Page Recounts
  • Sometimes less secure readers “can’t see the forest for the trees.”
  • They recount what happened page by page because they never really put it all together in their minds.
video intermediate
Video – Intermediate

Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency

  • Rosa Parks – Comprehension
  • Junie B. Jones – Book choices
conference discussion
Conference Discussion
  • What structures do the fourconferences you watched have in common?
  • What components did you like about the conferences you saw that you plan to implement?
  • What would you change about the conferences?
how long should a conference last
How long should a conference last?
  • Conference length can vary – depending on what you are noticing with a student.
  • Some students may only need a quick reminder of a skill to use.
  • Others you may feel it is important to spend a little more time with.
  • In general – they last between 3 -5 minutes for most students.
how often should i conference with students
How often should I conference with students?
  • If you are only doing conferences during the work time, you should be able to see 4-5 students a day.
  • This would allow you to meet with each student once a week.
  • If you are doing conferences AFTER small group instruction, you will probably see only 1-2 students each day.
  • This would allow you to see each student approximately once a month.
conferring or assessing
Conferring or Assessing?
  • Conference frequently with students.
  • Use a balanced approach for assessing.
  • Don’t use a “formal” assessment tool

at every conference.

  • Some conferences should be discussions

between two readers: you and the child.

  • As needed, use a running record or other

assessment tool to monitor students’ reading

process and progress.

conferring tips1
Conferring Tips
  • Keep a nurturing tone
  • Give students time to think
  • Follow up with more questions not answers
  • Listen carefully for distress signals
  • Set goals
  • Keep simple records
  • Keep the student’s needs driving the conference
tip 1 talk about what you see the student doing in the moment
Tip #1 – Talk about what you see the student doing in the moment.
  • I see you are laughing. What’s so funny?
  • I see you have lots of sticky notes in your book. What
  • are you writing?
  • I see you’re reading the back of the book. Tell me about that--what kind of information does it give you?
  • I see you have selected many nonfiction text. What do

you like about nonfiction?

2 talk about what you discussed at the last conference
#2 – Talk about what you discussed at the last conference.
  • Last time we met, we talked about finding “just right”

books. Share with me the books you selected. How do you know they are “just right?”

  • Last time we met, we worked on reading fluently and

paying attention to the punctuation marks. Read this

part aloud so I can hear how you’re doing…

  • Last time we worked on what you can do when you

come to a word you don’t know. What can you do to

figure out that word?

3 talk about the day s focus lesson topic or unit of study
#3 – Talk about the day’s focus lesson topic or unit of study
  • In the focus lesson we practiced creating sensory images. Show me a place in the book where you could create a strong image.
  • We are learning about nonfiction. How do you read this page? What part do you read first?
  • We have been practicing retelling. Retell what you have read so far in the book.
4 ask one or more open ended questions
#4 Ask one or more open ended questions
  • How’s your reading going?
  • Tell me about this book…what’s it about? What’s

happening so far in the story?

  • Tell me about the character in the story?
  • Why did you select this book?
  • Can I help you with anything in your reading?
5 try an over the shoulder read
#5 – Try an over the shoulder read.
  • I want you to silently read the rest of this page, and I’m going to sit here beside you and read it silently to myself.
  • When you’re done, let’s talk about what you’re thinking.

Things to Notice

• Silent Reading Rate—How long does it take for

the student to finish reading that section silently?

• Comprehension—Does the student understand

the selection? What strategies does the student

use?

• Oral Reading (optional)--# of errors, fluency &

phrasing

6 leave them with a focus
# 6 – Leave them with a focus.
  • At the end of the conference – be sure to set a goal for the student.
  • Give them something specific to work on or try .
discussion points
Discussion points
  • How are you currently conferencing with your students?
  • Weekly? Daily?
  • How many students a day? Week?
  • How long are your conferences?
  • How are you keeping records?
  • How are you using that information?
planning for strategy instruction
Planning for Strategy Instruction

Ongoing Assessments

Running Records

Conferencing

Observations

conferences as the source of information to organize small groups
Conferences as the source of information to organize small groups

Partner Work

  • Think about students at your grade level
  • What are typical patterns of need you find in your students?
  • Identify patterns for strategy groups.
small group action
Small Group Action
  • Record Units of Study you currently teach on the curriculum map
  • List lesson topics
  • Brainstorm conference questions that would encourage student application of the mini -lesson
ways to organize conference notes
Ways to Organize Conference Notes
  • User friendly; doesn’t have to be complicated
  • Record and Reflect over time
  • Way to keep track of who to confer with
  • Space to record information you need
share your notebooks
Share your notebooks
  • Gather ideas from other teachers about ways to organize their information.
reflection and take away
Reflection and take away
  • 3 - Write down three things you felt were important about conferencing.
  • 2 – Write down two new ideas you will try with conferencing
  • 1 - Write down one question that you still have.