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CS211, Lecture 20 Priority queues and Heaps. Readings: Weiss, sec. 6.9, secs. 21.1--21.5. When they've got two queues going, there's never any queue! P.J. Heaps. (The only quote I could find that had both queues and heaps in it.). Priority queue. In various contexts, one needs a list

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CS211, Lecture 20 Priority queues and Heaps


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    1. CS211, Lecture 20 Priority queues and Heaps Readings: Weiss, sec. 6.9, secs. 21.1--21.5. When they've got two queues going, there's never any queue! P.J. Heaps. (The only quote I could find that had both queues and heaps in it.)

    2. Priority queue In various contexts, one needs a list of items, each with a priority. Operations: Add an item (with some priority). Find an item with maximum priority. Remove a maximum-priority item. That is a priority queue. Example: files waiting to be printed, print in order of size (smaller the size, the higher the priority). Example: Job scheduler. Many processes waiting to be executed. Those with higher priority numbers are most important and should be give time before others.

    3. Priority-queue interface /** An instance is a priority queue */ public interface PriorityQueue { void insert(Comparable x); /** Insert x into the priority queue */ void makeEmpty(); /** Make the queue empty */ boolean isEmpty(); /** = “queue is empty” */ int size(); /** = the size of the queue */ /** = largest item in this queue --throw exception if queue is empty*/ Comparable findMax(); /** = delete and return largest item --throw exception if queue is empty*/ Comparable removeMax(); } x.compareTo(y) is used to see which has higher priority, x or y. Objects x and y could have many fields. Weiss also allows the possibility of changing the priority of an item in the queue. We don’t discuss that feature.

    4. Priority-queue implementations Possible implementations. Assume queue has n items. We look at average-case times. O(1) means constant time. Unordered array segment b[0..n-1]. Insert: O(1), findMax: O(n), removeMax: O(n). 2. Ordered array segment b[0..n-1]. Insert: O(n), findMax:O(1), removeMax: O(n) 3. Ordered array segments b[0..n-1], from largest to smallest. Insert: O(n), findMax:O(1), removeMax: O(1) binary search tree (if depth of tree is a minimum). Insert: O(log n), findMax:O(log n), removeMax: O(log n) But how do we keep the tree nicely balanced?

    5. Priority-queue implementations Possible implementations. Assume queue has n items. We look at average-case times. O(1) means constant time. 5. Special case. Suppose the possible priorities are 0..n-1. Keep an array priority[0..n-1] in which priority[p] is a linked list of items with priority p. Variable highestp: the highest p for which priority[p] is not empty (-1 if none) Insert, worst case: O(1), findMax:O(1), removeMax: O(n) 0 1 null 2 …

    6. 9 0 5 1 8 2 5 3 6 3 3 4 2 1 7 7 9 Definition of a heap First, number nodes in breadth-first order. A complete binary tree is one in which: if node number n is present, so are nodes 0..n-1. A heap is a complete binary tree in which: the value in any node is at least the values in its children. Caution: Weiss numbers nodes 1..n instead of 0..n-1.

    7. 9 0 5 1 8 2 5 3 6 3 3 4 2 1 7 7 9 Because a heap is a complete binary tree,it goes nicely in an array b Place node k in b[k]! The parent of node k is in b[(k-1)/2]. The parent of node 9 is in b[(9-1)/2], which is b[4] The parent of node 8 is in b[(8-1)/2], which is b[3] The children of node k are in b[k*2 + 1] b[k*2 + 2] Children of 3 are in b[7] and b[8]

    8. 9 0 5 1 8 2 5 3 6 2 3 4 3 1 7 7 9 Where is the maximum value of a heap? Max value of a heap is in node 0. Node 0 is in b[0] in our array implementation. Therefore, retrieving the max takes time O(1) (constant time).

    9. 8 8 2 9 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 5 1 1 1 1 2 8 7 8 2 2 2 2 2 7 7 7 3 3 3 3 6 6 6 6 2 2 4 3 3 4 3 3 4 2 3 3 3 3 2 4 5 5 2 5 2 2 5 2 7 7 7 7 9 9 9 9 Removing the max from an n-node tree takes time O(log n) /** Precondition: n > 0. Remove max value from heap. */

    10. 2 9 0 0 5 5 1 1 8 8 2 2 7 7 3 3 6 6 2 3 4 3 2 3 3 4 5 5 2 2 7 7 9 9 Removing the max from an n-node tree takes time O(log n) /** Remove max value from heap. Precondition: n > 0. */ n= n – 1; b[0]= b[n]; // Bubble b[0] down to its proper place in b[0..n-1] int k= 0; // inv: the only possible offender of the heap property is b[k] while (k has a child that is larger) { Let h be the larger of k’s childs; Swap b[h] and b[k]; k= h; } Whenever some computation is messy, write a function for it

    11. 2 0 5 1 8 2 7 3 6 3 2 4 3 5 2 7 9 /** k is a node in b[0..n-1]. If k has a larger child, return the larger of its children; otherwise, return k */ publicstatic int f(int[] b, int n, int k) { int h= 2*k+1; // first child; will be the larger child if (h >= n) return k; // k has no children // Set h to index of the larger of k’s childs. if (h+1 < n || b[h+1].compareTo(b[h]) > 0) h= h+1; if (b[k].compareTo(b[h] <= 0) return h; return k; } The children of node k are in b[k*2 + 1], b[k*2 + 2]

    12. 2 9 0 0 5 5 1 1 8 8 2 2 7 7 3 3 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 4 2 5 2 5 7 7 9 9 Removing the max from an n-node tree takes time O(log n) /** Remove max value from heap. Precondition: n > 0. */ n= n – 1; b[0]= b[n]; // Bubble b[0] down to its proper place in b[0..n-1] int k= 0; h= f(k); // inv: the only possible offender of the heap property is b[k] if k offends, h is its larger child; otherwise, h = k while (h != k) { Swap b[h] and b[k]; k= h; h= f(k); }

    13. 9 9 9 0 0 0 6 5 5 1 1 1 8 8 8 2 2 2 7 7 7 3 3 3 6 6 6 5 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 4 6 2 5 5 2 5 2 7 7 7 9 9 9 4 4 6 10 10 10 Inserting a value into a heap takes time O(log n) /** Insert ob into heap b[0..n-1]. */ b[n]= ob; n= n+1; Bubble b[n-1] up

    14. 0 h n 0 k n this is a heap sorted, >= b[0..h-1] this is a heap Heap sort /** Sort b[0..n-1] */ // Make b[0..n-1] into a heap invariant: b[0..k-1] is a heap (P1 below) for (int k= 0; k != n; k= k+1) { Bubble b[k] up } // Sort the heap b[0..n-1] invariant: Picture P2 below int h= n; while (h != 0) { h= h-1; Swap b[0] and b[h]; Bubble b[0] down in b[0..h-1] } Each part time O(n log n) Total time is O(n log n) P1: b P2: b