By jerry mear itzel lazcano manuel qui onez nidya d az sophomore magnet academy 2010
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Statistics. By: Jerry Mear, Itzel Lazcano, Manuel Quiñonez, Nidya Díaz Sophomore Magnet Academy 2010. Measures of Central Tendency. The mean, median and mode are single central values that help describe a set number of data . Here there are some definitions and examples of terms.

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By jerry mear itzel lazcano manuel qui onez nidya d az sophomore magnet academy 2010

Statistics

By: Jerry Mear, Itzel Lazcano, Manuel Quiñonez, Nidya Díaz

Sophomore Magnet Academy

2010


Measures of Central Tendency

The mean, median and mode are single central values that help describe a set number of data .

Here there are some definitions and examples of terms


Finding the Measures

Data: 98 95 99 97 89 92 97 62 90

1. Organize the data

62 89 90 92 95 97 97 98 99

2. Find the mean

To find the mean find the sum of the values

62 +89+ 90 +92+ 95 +97+ 97+ 98+ 99= 819

Number of values 9

Divide by the number of values 819/9=91

3. Find the median

To find the median find the number that’s in the middle

62 89 90 92 95 97 97 98 99

This is the middle term

4. Find the mode

To find the mode: what number shows up the most?

97 because it occurs more that the other values


Box and Whisker Plots

Data:

1, 20, 30, 40, 100

Find the median  30

The lower extreme –the smallest values of the set of numbers  1

The upper extreme – the largest number of the set of numbers 100

Finding the lower quartile and upper quartile

Lower quartile – the number between the median and the lower extreme

1, 20, 30  lower quartile = 20

Upper quartile –the number between the median and the upper extreme

30, 40, 100  upper quartile = 40

if there is more than one number between the median and the extreme take the mean of those values

After finding these make a box and whisker plot by

Marking the upper quartile, lower quartile, upper extreme, and lower extreme on a number line


Stem and Leaf Plot

Purpose: Stem and Leaf plots are used to organized sets of data.

Data: 1,20,30,40,100

Stem and Leaf Plot Tens Place Ones Place

0 1

2 0

3 0

4 0

10 0


Theoretical Probability

The odds of an event happening, based on all the possible outcomes.

Example:

Find the probability of getting a prime number when you roll a

number cube.

1. Find the number of favorable outcomes…

1,3,5,  there are 3 favorable outcomes.

1,2,3,4,5,6  there are 6 total outcomes

2. Plug in the favorable outcomes and the total number of possible outcomes.

P(E) =

3. Simplify

P(E) = ½

There is a 1 in 2, or 50% chance of getting a prime number.

3

_

6


Experimental Probability

The probability that a certain outcome will occur,

determined through experimentation.

Experimental Probability =

Example:

A coin is tossed 60 times. 27 times head appeared. Find the experimental probability of getting heads.

1. Find the total number of times heads appeared.

27

2. Find the total number of times it was tried.

#of experiments = 60

3. Plug the numbers into the formula.

27/60 = 9/20

Number of event occurrences

_________________________

Total number of trials


Conditional Probability

We find the conditional probability by P(B|A)

Lets take this data 7 males say yes to an answer and 8 say no

P(did a chore | male ) = 7/15 because 7 out of 15 said they did a chore.


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