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Investigating dyslexia friendly practices in teacher education. Sue Griffiths – University of Northampton Liane Purnell- Newman University College SEDA 2011. Dyslexia and Universities. Dyslexia identified as a disability under UK legislation

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investigating dyslexia friendly practices in teacher education

Investigating dyslexia friendly practices in teacher education

Sue Griffiths – University of Northampton

Liane Purnell- Newman University College

SEDA 2011

dyslexia and universities
Dyslexia and Universities
  • Dyslexia identified as a disability under UK legislation
  • Largest declared category of disability at university
  • Legal requirement to provide support and reasonable adjustments - lottery
  • Lifelong effects
  • Minor adjustments can make a big difference to students with dyslexia and be helpful to all students
so what is dyslexia
So... what is dyslexia?
  • No real consensus even after 100 years of research
  • Neurobiological developmental condition - genetic
  • Part of the normal continuum - neurodiversity
  • Individual profile of strengths and difficulties
dyslexia definitions we adopted
Dyslexia definitions we adopted

Dysexia is a specific learning difficulty which is neurobiological in origin and persists across the lifespan. It is characterised by diffficulties with phonoloigcal processing, rapid naming, working memory, processing speed and the automatic development of skills that are unexpected in relation to an individual’s other cognitive abilities.

British Dyslexia Association (2007:5)

dyslexia definitions we adopted6
Dyslexia definitions we adopted

Developmental dyslexia is a genetically inherited and neurologically determined inefficiency in working memory, the information processing system fundamental to learning and performance in conventional education and work settings.

McLoughlin, Leather and Stringer (2002:19)

how dyslexia may affect a student
How dyslexia may affect a student
  • lnefficiency in short term and working memory
  • Difficulties with phonological processing
  • Problems with visual processing
  • Difficulties with motor skills or co-ordination
  • Managing time and organisation
how might dyslexia affect a student at university
How might dyslexia affect a student at university?
  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Oral fluency
  • Numeracy
  • Organisation
  • Attention
  • Self-esteem

Pavey et al. (2010); Pollak (2005)

the research project
The Research Project
  • Small scale action research
  • Aim to make our practice dyslexia-friendly
  • Model good practise
  • Build confidence in students to support pupils with dyslexia
  • Raise awareness in our insititutions
the research project10
The Research Project
  • Comments sought from ITE students with dyslexia – How could teaching materials be more dyslexia-friendly?
  • Feedback used to seek comments from non-dyslexic peers
  • Self-audit tool developed and trialled with non-ITE students by dyslexia tutor and in training sessions in local industry
production of self audit tool
Production of self-audit tool
  • Rooted in professional practice and experience of working with students with dyslexia
  • Underpinned by the literature
  • Based on previous research undertaken by presenters
  • Developed from Pavey et al. (2010)
initial findings
Initial Findings

This will help dyslexic and non-dyslexic students and will help me improve diversity and inclusion when I am in school

PGCE KS2/3 Maths

Student: Male

initial findings13
Initial Findings

This is excellent. Adding background information to handouts would also help. For ages, I didn’t realise that the lecturer was referring to a canal when he talked about Suez !

U/gradKS2/3 Science

Student: Female

initial findings14
Initial Findings

I showed this to my sister who is dyslexic and is doing her A Levels. We both think it will be really helpful.

U/gradKS2/3 Science

Student: Female

initial findings15
Initial Findings

This research is great!. It makes total sense.

PGCE KS2/3 Maths

Student: Female

I think this is great!

PGCE KS2/3 Maths

Student: Female

I feel privileged to take part in this

research.

U/grad KS2/3 Science

Student: Female

initial findings industry
Initial Findings:Industry

Font and layout attractive and easy to read.

Font size 14 excessive for text but titles

work well.

There are some technical issues to

overcome e.g. inputting text etc

references further reading
References/Further reading
  • Association of Dyslexia Specialists in Education (ADSHE) (2006) Guidance for good practice: Supporting students on clinical practice. Borehamwood: ADSHE.
  • Association of Dyslexia Specialists in Education (ADSHE) 2008) Guidance for quality assurance in specialist support for students with specific learning difficulties. Borehamwood: ADSHE.
  • British Dyslexia Association. (2007) Definition of Dyslexia. [online] Bracknell: BDA. Available from: http://www.bdadyslexia.org.uk/about-dyslexia/further-information/dyslexia-research-information-.html
references further reading18
References/Further reading
  • Farmer, M., Riddick, R., Sterling, C. (2002) Dyslexia and Inclusion. Assessment and support in higher education. London: Whurr.
  • Fuller, M., Georgeson, J., Healey, M., Hurst, A., Kelly, K., Riddell, S., Roberts, H., Weedon, E., (2009) Improving disabled students’ learning. Experiences and outcomes. London: Routledge
  • Griffin, E., Pollak, D. (2009) Student experiences of neurodiversity in higher education: insights from the BRAINHE project. Dyslexia. 15 (1), 23-41.
references further reading19
References/Further reading
  • Griffin, E., Pollak, D. (2009) Student experiences of neurodiversity in higher education: insights from the BRAINHE project. Dyslexia. 15 (1), 23-41.
  • Jamieson, C., Morgan, E. (2008) Managing dyslexia at university: A resource for students, academic and support staff. London: Routledge.
  • McLoughlin, D., Leather, C., Stringer, P. (2002) The adult dyslexic. Interventions and outcomes. London: Whurr.
references further reading20
References/Further reading
  • Mortimore, T., Crozier, W.R. (2009) Dyslexia and difficulties with study skills in higher education. Studies in Higher Education. 31 (2), 235-251.
  • Pavey, B., Meehan, M., Waugh, A. (2010) Dyslexia-friendly further and higher education. London: Sage.
  • Pollak, D. (2005) Dyslexia, the self and higher education – learning life histories of students identified as dyslexic. London: Trentham Books Ltd
  • Riddell, S. Weedon E. (2006) What counts as a reasonable adjustment? Dyslexic students and the concept of fair assessment. International Studies in Sociology of Education. 16 (1), 57-73.
references further reading21
References/Further reading
  • Singleton, C.H. (Chair) (1999) Dyslexia in higher education: policy, provision and practice. Report of the national working party on dyslexia in higher education. Hull: University of Hull on behalf of the Higher Education Funding Councils for England and Scotland.
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