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The Black Death. 1347 - 1351. Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley HS Chappaqua, NY. The Culprits. The Famine of 1315-1317. By 1300 Europeans were farming almost all the land they could cultivate. A population crisis developed.

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slide1

The Black Death

1347 - 1351

Ms. Susan M. PojerHorace Greeley HS Chappaqua, NY

slide3

The Famine of 1315-1317

  • By 1300 Europeans were farming almost all the land they could cultivate.
  • A population crisis developed.
  • Climate changes in Europe produced three years of crop failures between 1315-17 because of excessive rain.
  • As many as 15% of the peasants in some English villages died.
  • One consequence ofstarvation & povertywas susceptibility todisease.
slide5

The Symptoms

Bulbous

Septicemic Form:almost 100% mortality rate.

slide8

The Disease Cycle

Flea drinks rat blood that carries the bacteria.

Bacteria

multiply in

flea’s gut.

Human is infected!

Flea bites human and regurgitates blood into human wound.

Flea’s gut cloggedwith bacteria.

slide10

Medieval Art & the Plague

Bring out your dead!

slide11

Medieval Art & the Plague

An obsession with death.

slide12

Boccaccio in The Decameron

The victims ate lunch with their friends and dinner with their ancestors.

slide15

Attempts to Stop the Plague

“Leeching”

A Doctor’s Robe

slide16

Attempts to Stop the Plague

Flagellanti:Self-inflicted “penance” for our sins!

slide17

Attempts to Stop the Plague

Pogromsagainst the Jews

“Golden Circle” obligatory badge

“Jew” hat

slide19

A Little Macabre Ditty

“A sickly season,” the merchant said,“The town I left was filled with dead,and everywhere these queer red fliescrawled upon the corpses’ eyes,eating them away.”“Fair make you sick,” the merchant said,“They crawled upon the wine and bread.Pale priests with oil and books,bulging eyes and crazy looks,dropping like the flies.”

slide20

A Little Macabre Ditty (2)

“I had to laugh,” the merchant said,“The doctors purged, and dosed, and bled;“And proved through solemn disputation“The cause lay in some constellation.“Then they began to die.”“First they sneezed,” the merchant said,“And then they turned the brightest red,Begged for water, then fell back.With bulging eyes and face turned black,they waited for the flies.”

slide21

A Little Macabre Ditty (3)

“I came away,” the merchant said,“You can’t do business with the dead.“So I’ve come here to ply my trade.“You’ll find this to be a fine brocade…”

And then hesneezed……….!

slide22

The Mortality Rate

35% - 70%

25,000,000 dead !!!