sexual harassment training l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Sexual Harassment Training PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Sexual Harassment Training

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 18

Sexual Harassment Training - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 410 Views
  • Uploaded on

Sexual Harassment Training. Just the Facts. Just the Facts. Principles,Concepts and Definitions Sexual Harassment and the Law Handling the Sexual Harassment Complaint Dangerous Words Protecting Yourself and Preventing Sexual Harassment

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Sexual Harassment Training' - sandra_john


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
just the facts
Just the Facts
  • Principles,Concepts and Definitions
  • Sexual Harassment and the Law
  • Handling the Sexual Harassment Complaint
  • Dangerous Words
  • Protecting Yourself and Preventing Sexual Harassment
  • To Protect Yourself Against Charges of Sexual Harassment
  • Informal Procedures
  • Formal Procedures
just the facts3
Just the Facts
  • Factors to Consider in Determining Whether Conduct Rises to the Level of Actionable Sexual Harassment.

Severity

Conduct

Repeated

Mental

Effect

Gender

Document

Report

Behavior

vocabulary
Vocabulary
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Quid Pro Quo
  • Hostile Environment
  • Unwelcome
  • Reasonable Person
  • Intent vs. Impact
sexual harassment and the law
Sexual Harassment and the Law

Title IX—Education Amendments of 1972

Federal legislation prohibiting sex discrimination in education; file with U.S. Department of Education; can sue privately on own behalf. Types of remedies: Cut-off of federal funding to the educational institution. Institution and officials liable for monetary damages.

sexual harassment and the law6
Sexual Harassment and the Law

Meritor Saving Bank v. Vinson 106 S.Ct.2339 (1986)

The U.S. Supreme Court rules that sexual harassment violates Title VII prohibitions against sex discrimination in employment, and does not have to cause tangible economic harm to be actionable. It defined a hostile environment and delineated between voluntariness and welcomeness.

sexual harassment and the law7
Sexual Harassment and the Law

Title VII—1964: Civil Rights Act

Federal legislation prohibiting sexual discrimination in employment; file with Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Types of remedies: Monetary compensation for back pay, lost benefits, and damages; compensatory (e.g. emotional distress) and punitive damages; possible job reinstatement.

recent court rulings
Recent Court Rulings

Clarkson University of New York did not sexually discriminate against a female receiving clerk or wrongly terminate her, OCR held. The clerk alleged she was verbally harassed by a co-workers and her supervisor. OCR found, however, that the clerk herself engaged in vulgar and abusive sexual language at work and did not object at the time to the only corroborated statement made: “If you are going to get raped, you may as well sit back and enjoy it.” That the statement was not severe enough to constitute sexual harassment, OCR found, holding that the clerk was terminated not because of her gender, but because of excessive absenteeism, poor job performance, a poor attitude and repeated use of vulgar and obscene language.

handling the sexual harassment complaint
Handling the Sexual Harassment Complaint
  • Take the report seriously.
  • Listen, sympathize, but don’t judge.
  • Don’t delay.
  • Respond to concerns.
  • Document.
  • Follow up on the complaint.
  • Avoid using “dangerous words.”
dangerous words
Dangerous Words

When responding to a complaint, be careful that these words don’t come out of your mouth:

  • It’s just teasing—no big deal.
  • The people in our school would never do…
  • I know he/she didn’t mean anything like that.
  • It’s your fault for dressing so provocatively.
  • You need to learn to handle these things.
  • Just ignore it.
  • He puts his arms around everyone.
  • Why can’t you learn to accept a compliment?
  • You must have wanted it, otherwise you would have told him no.
  • That’s how they do things where he comes from.
  • It’s just a joke. Lighten up.
  • No one’s filed a charge so our hands are tied.
  • We’ve never had a complaint, so we don’t have a problem.
  • This kind of behavior is all part of growing up.
  • It’s a matter of hormones we can’t control that
  • If we had to discipline every student who used bad language we’d never get anything else done.
  • It’s just a prank that got out of hand.
protecting yourself and preventing sexual harassment
Protecting Yourself and Preventing Sexual Harassment

The following checklist can be used to examine behavior

  • Does this behavior contribute to achieving our goals?
  • Could this behavior hurt my colleagues or students if they were hurt?
  • Could this behavior be sending out signals that invite harassing behavior on the part of others?
  • Would you say it in front of your spouse, parent, or child?
  • Would you say it if you were going to be quoted on the front page of the newspaper?
  • Would you say/act the same way to a member of your same gender?
  • Why does it need to be said at all?
  • What business is it furthering?
to protect yourself against charges of sexual harassment
To Protect Yourself Against Charges of Sexual Harassment
  • Keep your hands to yourself.
  • Don’t talk about sex on the job.
  • Never mix a discussion of “social life” with a job-related counseling session, particularly if you are discussing a disciplinary procedure or a possible upgrade, promotion, or hire!
  • Keep compliments casual and fairly impersonal.
  • Avoid jokes, words, phrases and gestures with sexual meanings.
  • Don’t assume that a friendly woman/man will be willing to go to bed with you. Assume only that friendly people are friendly.
  • Respect a person’s personal space.
unc policy on sexual harassment
Formal Procedures

Purpose: To determine if sexual harassment has occurred, the culpability of the alleged offender, appropriate sanctions or remedies.

How Initiated: Generally the complainant, the institution or a third party writes charges of sexual harassment. Usually invoked when the behavior is serious or repeated and not amendable to informal procedures.

Informal Procedures

Purpose: To stop the behavior. Should not be used for repeated or serious offenses (e.g. assault).

How Initiated: Must be complainant’s preference to use informal procedures. Generally do not involve written charges.

UNC Policy on Sexual Harassment
unc policy on sexual harassment14
Formal Procedures

Investigation: Always required.

Hearing or other due process proceeding: Yes

Outcomes: If harassment is found a variety of sanctions may be applied

Informal Procedures

Investigation: Complainant and alleged harasser may be interviewed, but usually not extensive investigation is necessary

Hearing or other due process proceeding: No

Outcomes: Generally, harassment stops (or formal processing of complaint is launched). Outcomes may include apology, promise not to repeat behavior, transfer of one party, voluntary resignation of alleged harasser.

UNC Policy on Sexual Harassment
unc policy on sexual harassment15
Formal Procedures

Advantages: Sanctions may be invoked; more likely to increase community awareness of problem and institution’s commitment to solving it; may settle credibility issues; creates record in event of future claims

Informal Procedures

Advantages: Less frightening and litigious; confidentiality easier to maintain; less likelihood of negative publicity; no need to challenge motives or behaviors; may educate harasser; no issues of definition of sexual harassment or credibility or the parties; complainant may play active role in resolution; provides options for complainant and wide range of sanctions; less costly than formal proceedings; usually less polarizing.

UNC Policy on Sexual Harassment
unc policy on sexual harassment16
Formal Procedures

Who to Call

Marshall Parks

12829 Phone

11386 Fax

Marshall.Parks@unco.edu

Josephine.Sanchez@unco.edu

Informal Procedures

Who to Call

Your Supervisor

Your Dean and/or

Department Chair

UNC Policy on Sexual Harassment
slide17
Factors to Consider in Determining whether Conduct Rises to the Level of Actionable Sexual Harassment
where to get more information
Where to Get More Information
  • Samantha Ortiz-Schriver, Dean of Students
  • UNC Human Resources
  • http://www.unco.edu/hr/relations.htm