H1N1 Influenza
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H1N1 Influenza. “Swine Flu”. WHAT IS SWINE FLU?. - Respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses (H1N1 subtype) that causes regular outbreaks in pigs. . SIGNS and SYMPTOMS. Fever Cough Sore throat Runny or stuffy nose

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H1N1 Influenza

“Swine Flu”


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WHAT IS SWINE FLU?

- Respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses (H1N1 subtype) that causes regular outbreaks in pigs.


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SIGNS and SYMPTOMS

  • Fever

  • Cough

  • Sore throat

  • Runny or stuffy nose

  • Body aches

  • Headache

  • Chills

  • Fatigue

  • In addition, vomiting (25%) and diarrhea (25%) have been reported. (Higher rate than for seasonal flu.)


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Who are most at risk?

  • Children below 5 years of age

  • Pregnant women

  • People 50 years of age and older

  • People of any age with chronic medical conditions, (such as pulmonary disease, including asthma, diabetes, neuromuscular disorders or heart disease)

  • People with weakened immune systems


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HOW DOES SWINE FLU SPREAD?

  • This virus is thought to spread the same way seasonal flu spreads

  • Primarily through respiratory droplets

    • Coughing

    • Sneezing

    • Touching respiratory droplets on yourself, another person, or an object, then touching mucus membranes (e.g., mouth, nose, eyes) without washing hands


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How is it treated?

  • Two drugs are commonly used

  • Tamiflu- capsules

  • Relenza- inhaled

  • Drugs must be given early to be effective i.e within 48-72 hrs .


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Take these everyday steps to protect your health

  • Wash your hands often with

    soap and warm water,

    especially after you cough

    or sneeze. Wash for 15 – 20

    seconds.

  • Alcohol-based hand

    wipes or gel sanitizers are also

    effective.


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Take these everyday steps to protect your health

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

    Germs spread this way.

  • Avoid contact with sick people.


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If you get sick…

  • Stay home if you’re sick

    for 7 days after your symptoms

    begin or until you’ve been

    symptom-free for 24 hours,

    whichever is longer.

  • If you are sick, limit your contact

    with other people as much as possible.


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Watch for emergency warning signs

  • In adults:

    • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

    • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen

    • Sudden dizziness

    • Confusion

    • Severe or persistent vomiting

    • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with

      fever and worse cough


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Emergency warning signs in children

In children:

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing

  • Bluish or gray skin color

  • Not drinking enough fluids

  • Severe or persistent vomiting

  • Not waking up or not interacting

  • Irritable, the child does not want to be held

  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return

    with fever and worse cough


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Yanbu Public Health Department

  • No “confirmed” case ; only “contacts” / “carriers”

  • 95% of “contact” cases are acute cases

  • Not a disease for admission except in some cases

  • Isolation at home

  • H1N1 virus = intermediate virus

  • MOH procedure- confirm through a nose/throat swab test- 4 centers (Yanbu  Medinah)- usually is confirmed within a week


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Action steps for YIS to prevent the spread of Flu

Action steps for Teachers to prevent the spread of Flu

  • Educate and encourage students to cover their mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing.

  • Remind students to practice good hand hygiene.

  • Be a good role model

  • Keep an eye out for sick students and send them to the school health office for further evaluation

  • Clean surfaces and items

  • Teachers should also stay home when sick

  • If you are at higher risk for flu complications speak with your doctor as soon as you develop flu-like symptoms

  • Educate and encourage students and staff to cover their mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing.

  • Remind teachers, staff, and students to practice good hand hygiene.

  • Send sick students, teachers, and staff home if sick.

  • Clean surfaces and items

  • Move students, teachers, and staff to a separate room

  • Have Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)  masks

  • Encourage medical evaluation for sick students and staff

  • Stay in regular communication with local public health officials


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Summary

  • CDC anticipates that there will be more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths associated with this new virus in the coming days and weeks because the population has little to no immunity against it.

  • We must all work together to limit and control the transmission of novel H1N1 influenza.


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Summary

  • For the most current information on the H1N1 influenza outbreak, visit http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

  • CDC, WHO, and public health officials worldwide are carefully monitoring the situation.

  • Follow all recommendations for preventing the spread of influenza.

  • For local guidance, contact your state, local, or county health officials.


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Resources

  • http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/

  • http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/espanol/

  • 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)

  • http://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/en/index.html


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