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Secondary Response to Intervention (RtI) Team Training for Grades 6-12. Facilitated by: Sherry Faulk, Terryl Swejk and Karen Williams Day 1: January 10, 2013. State Support Team, Region 9 www.sst9.org. One of 16 regions in Ohio (State System of Support)

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secondary response to intervention rti team training for grades 6 12

Secondary Response to Intervention (RtI) Team Training for Grades 6-12

Facilitated by:

Sherry Faulk, Terryl Swejk and Karen Williams

Day 1: January 10, 2013

state support team region 9 www sst9 org
State Support Team, Region 9www.sst9.org
  • One of 16 regions in Ohio (State System of Support)
  • Provides support to all school districts and community schools in Stark, Wayne and Holmes Counties Local Schools in such areas as:
    • Special Education Compliance (Technical Assistance)
    • School Improvement (Ohio Improvement Process)
    • Early Learning and School Readiness
    • Family Engagement
series facilitators
Series Facilitators

Sherry

Terryl Swejk, M.Ed.

Sherry Faulk, M.Ed.

Karen Williams, Ed.D.

series schedule
Series Schedule

Training Dates

  • Day 1 January 10, 2013
  • Day 2 – January 31, 2013
  • Day 3 – February 14, 2013
  • Day 4 – March 20, 2013
  • Day 5 – April 10, 2013

Site Visits at Your Buildings

  • February 28, 2013

or

  • March 1, 2013
slide6

RtI Toolkit

Parking Lot

Group Norms

Getting Started

Roles and Responsibilities

Facilities

seven norms of collaborative work
Seven Norms of Collaborative Work

Garmston and Wellman, 2009.

today s agenda
Today’s Agenda

8:30 – 11:30 Setting the Stage

RtI Overview

11:30 – 12:30 Lunch

12:30 – 3:00 The RtI Framework

RtI Tier I

3:00 – 3:30 Team Assignment

and Evaluations

team introductions
Team Introductions

Create a poster:

Give your team a name

Use a symbol or non-linguistic that identifies/describes each team member

Report out to whole group (choose how you wish to do this…song, rap, cheer, video)

learning targets day 1
Learning Targets – Day 1

Participants will learn the basics of the RTI Framework.

  • What is RTI
  • Why RTI
  • Where RTI fits with other district initiatives
  • Basic components needed to implement RTI
slide12

“The quality of a school as a learning community can be measured by how effectively it addresses the needs of struggling students.” Wright, 2005

rate your school
Rate Your School

Step 1: Individually, read the

Jim Wright quote and rate your school

Step 2: Share your thoughts with tablemates

Step 3: As a group, determine your school rating and why you selected that rating

Step 4: Share-out whole group

  • Give your rating and tell why your team selected this rating
self report needs assessment

APPLICATION

Self-Report Needs Assessment

1. Rate each statement

based on your individual

knowledge set.

2. Record your answers in

Column A.

Materials Needed:

Self- Report Needs Assessment

essential components of rti a closer look at response to intervention
Essential Components of RTIA Closer Look at Response to Intervention

Step 2: Individual Work

  • Read Pages 1 – 7 of the article
  • Highlight Critical Points
  • Complete 3-2-1 Form

Step 1: Locate

“Essential Components of RtI” article

3-2-1 RtI Share Out Form

Assign:

1. Taskmaster

2. Recorder

3. Reporter

  • Step 3: Team Work
  • Discuss your responses
  • Select one critical point from each section to share with the large group
definition
Definition:

Response to intervention integrates assessment and intervention within a multi-level prevention system to maximize student achievement and reduce behavior problems.

RTI, schools:

  • identify students at risk for poor learning outcomes
  • provide evidence-based interventions
  • monitor student progress
  • adjust the intensity and nature of those interventions depending on a student’s responsiveness

National Center on Response to Intervention

rti essential components
RtI Essential Components
  • High quality Tier 1: Core Instruction
  • Universal screening
  • Ongoing progress monitoring
  • Tiered interventions
  • Data based decision making

Tiered Interventions in High Schools, May 2010

rti its most basic form
RtI - Its Most Basic Form

Formula for Learning

Traditional Schools

TI + T = L

Targeted Instruction + Time = Learning

Constant + Constant = Variable

rti its most basic form1
RtI - Its Most Basic Form

Formula for Learning

Professional Learning Community (PLC) Schools

TI + T = L

Targeted Instruction + Time = Learning

Variable + Variable = Constant

tiered instruction
Tiered Instruction

Tiers are identified by focus of intervention:

  • Tier I - Core, high quality instruction
  • Tier II - Small group with specific focus on deficit
  • Tier III - Move from “intervention to prevent” to “intervention to address” smaller group or individual needs – intensive
importance of the 3 tier model
Importance of the 3-Tier Model
  • A systematic approach that provides student interventions
  • Identifies students BEFORE they fall behind
  • Provides students with support throughout the educational process
slide23

1-5% Intensive Individualized Interventions

1-5% Intensive Individualized Interventions

5-10% Targeted Interventions

5-10% Targeted Interventions

80-90% School-Wide Universal Interventions

80-90% School-Wide Universal Interventions

Ohio Integrated Systems Model for

Academics and Behavior

Academic Systems

Behavioral Systems

Tier III

Tier II

Tier I

Adapted from OSEP Effective School-Wide Interventions

pbis positive behavioral interventions and supports
PBIS - Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

Research-based Intervention Practices

  • School-Wide
  • Individual Student
  • Non Classroom
  • Classroom
  • Family Engagement

Windram, Bollman and Johnson , 2012

slide25

These students

get these tiers of support

in order to meet benchmarks.

think about intervention like this
Think about intervention like this:

What do all students need?

Who could benefit through repeated practice?

Who needs something in addition?

Who needs to do it in a different way?

How do we know if it is working?

slide29

Goals of RtI:

Prevention of academic/behavior problems

  • Attend to skill gaps early
  • Provide interventions/instruction early
  • Close skill gaps to prevent failure

Determination of eligibility as a student with a specific learning disability

  • Pattern of inadequate response to interventions may result in referral to special education
  • Student intervention response data are considered for SLD eligibility
why rti
Why RtI?
  • Early interventions trump later interventions!
  • When we wait:
  • Problems are harder to solve
  • Problems are more entrenched
  • Problems are less malleable
  • Problems infect multiple domains
  • An early problem of 1 or 2 skills becomes a
  • later problem involving 5 or 6 skills.
understanding the roots of rti
Understanding the Roots of RtI

Influence of the Research

  • Tiered models of intervention
  • Findings of the National Reading Panel (2000)
  • Use of a three-tiered model in reading research

Addison & Warger, 2011

understanding the roots of rti1
Understanding the Roots of RtI

Influence of Legislation

  • No Child Left Behind Act
  • Individuals w/Disabilities Education Act of 2004
  • Ohio ESEA Flexibility Waiver

Addison & Warger, 2011

understanding the roots of rti2
Understanding the Roots of RtI

Influence of Policy

  • Over representation of minority groups in special education
  • Changing relationships between general and special education
  • Access to academic monitoring tools in response to increased accountability

Addison & Warger, 2011

ohio data school and beyond
Ohio Data: School and Beyond
  • 40,200 students did not graduate in 2009…

Projected lost lifetime earnings: $10.5 billion

  • If those students had graduated…

Estimated health-care savings: $502.1 million

  • If Ohio’s high schools graduated all students ready for college…

Ohio would save $132.1 million yearly in community college remediation costs

  • If male high school graduation increased by 5%...

Ohio would save $233 million yearly in crime- related spending http//www.all4ed.org

slide35

Avg Classroom Academic

Performance Level

Target Student

Discrepancy 1: Skill Gap

(Current Performance Level)

Discrepancy 2:

Gap in Rate of Learning (‘Slope of Improvement’)

‘Dual-Discrepancy’

advantages of an rti approach
Advantages of an RtI Approach:
  • Provides instructional assistance in a timely fashion (e.g., NOT a wait-to-fail model).
  • Helps ensure a student’s poor academic performance is not due to poor instruction or inappropriate curriculum.
  • Informs the teacher and improves instruction because assessment data is collected and closely linked to interventions.
crafting a vision for rti in o ur school

APPLICATION

Why RtI?

Crafting a Vision for RtI in Our School

Mission Statement – A brief description of your fundamental purpose.

(Why do we exist?)

Vision Statement – A brief description of your long term plan.

(Where are we going?)

Materials Needed:

Your school’s mission and vision statements

“Crafting a Vision for RtI in Our School” handout

Assign:

1. Taskmaster

2. Recorder

3. Reporter

Assign:

1. Taskmaster

2. Recorder

3. Reporter

escalator failure and repair
Escalator Failure and Repair

YouTube stuck on an escalator and repairman - Bing Videos

rti connections iat
RtI Connections: IAT
  • The Intervention Assistance Team (IAT) is intended to serve as a vehicle to intervene for students who are struggling in school.
  • The IAT designs a support plan with all stakeholders to help the student.
  • In most cases IAT occurs after a series of interventions have taken place.
rti uses teams to problem solve
RtI Uses Teams to Problem Solve
  • IAT = Problem Solving Team
  • The key objective in RTI is to select an instructional or behavior-management strategy that matches a student’s specific needs.
  • Students with serious academic skill deficits require very different intervention strategies than those who lack motivation or are simply too disorganized to turn in assignments.
rti connections special education
RtI Connections: Special Education

Prior to IDEA 2004, many states used a

‘Test-Score Discrepancy Model’ to identify

Learning Disabilities.

  • A significant gap between I.Q. score and achievement test score equaled a learning disability
  • no definition for

“significant”

Wright, 2005

limitations to the test score discrepancy model
Limitations to the‘test-score discrepancy model’:
  • Requires student to fail before support can be provided
  • Outside factors not considered
  • Does not provide reason why student is struggling
  • No consistency in Learning Disability diagnosis
idea 2004 added rti language
IDEA 2004 Added RtI Language

§ 300.307 Specific learning disabilities.

(a) General. A State must adopt criteria for determining whether a child has a specific learning disability…. the criteria adopted by the State—

(2) May not require the use of a severe discrepancy between intellectual ability and achievement for determining whether a child has a specific learning disability as defined in § 300.8; [‘Discrepancy’ Model]

(3) Must permit the use of a process that determines if the child responds to scientific, research-based intervention…[‘RTI’ Model]

NOTE: [bracketed comments added]

Source: IDEA (2004, 2005). Proposed Regulations from US Department of Education (§ 300.307)

slide49
Under RTI, if a student is found to be

performing well below peers, the school will:

Estimate the academic skill gap between the student and typically-performing peers.

Determine the likely reason(s) for the student’s depressed academic performance.

Select a research-based intervention likely to improve the student's academic functioning.

Monitor academic progress frequently to evaluate the impact of the intervention.

If the student fails to respond to several well-implemented interventions, consider a referral to Special Education

Windram, Bollman & Johnson, 2012

1 estimate the academic skill gap between the target student and typically performing peers
1. Estimate the academic skill gap between the target student and typically-performing peers:

Three methods:

Local Norms:A sample of students at a school is screened in an academic skill to create grade norms.

Research Norms:Norms for ‘typical’ growth are derived from a research sample, published, and applied by schools to their own student populations .

Criterion-Referenced Benchmarks:A minimum level,or threshold, of competence is determined for a skill. The benchmark is usually defined as a level of proficiency needed for later school success.

2 determine the likely reason s for the student s depressed academic performance
2. Determine the likely reason(s) for the student’s depressed academic performance:

Several possibilities:

Skill Deficit:The student lacks the necessary skills to perform the academic task.

‘Fragile’ Skills:The student possesses the necessary skills but is not yet fluent and automatic in those skills.

Performance (Motivation) Deficit:The student has the necessary skills but lacks the motivation to complete the academic task.

3 select a research based intervention likely to improve the student s academic functioning
3. Select a research-based intervention likely to improve the student's academic functioning:

Research-based, scientifically based and evidence-based are all terms used about instructional practices researchers have found to be effective.

Research-based practices include: scientifically validated curriculum series, instructional practices, programs and interventions.

REQUIRED by Both NCLB and IDEA 2004

slide53

Scientifically Based Research

Evidenced Based Research

4 monitor academic progress frequently to evaluate the impact of the intervention
4. Monitor academic progress frequently to evaluate the impact of the intervention:

Sample progress measuring tools:

Measures for Basic Academic Skills

  • Curriculum-Based Measurements (CBM)

Measures for Classroom Academic and General Behaviors:

  • Daily Behavior Report Cards (DBRCs)
  • Direct Observation
slide55

5. If the student fails to respond to a series of several well-implemented interventions, then consider a referral for Special Education evaluation.

  • Interventions implemented with integrity and fidelity
  • Progress-monitoring data shows that the student failed to meet the learning target
two models of implementation
Two Models of Implementation

Protocol Model

  • Provides specific intervention for similar learning or behavior problems
  • Only intervention plan used to solve the identified problem
  • Staff trained and monitored for fidelity of implementation

Problem-Solving Model

  • Customized plans based on student needs
  • Multiple intervention programs
  • Staff receives more complex training
  • More progress monitoring and decision-making needed

Searle, 2010

protocol model
Protocol Model

Advantages

Disadvantages

Having only one approach may not meet needs of all

Lacks staff buy-in because they did not create the plan

Training is limited

  • Training is efficient
  • Only one plan
  • Program is very specific so is easy to monitor

Searle, 2010

problem solving model
Problem-Solving Model

Advantages

Disadvantages

Team members need a great deal of expertise

Training is time consuming due to choices in interventions

Monitoring can be troublesome

  • Plans are customized, not one size fits all
  • Model is flexible
  • Buy-in from those implementing the plan

Searle, 2010

two models of rti
Two Models of RtI:

All teachers must:

  • Assess all students
  • Diagnose reasons for problems
  • Use research based interventions
  • Implement and monitor with fidelity
  • Adjusts interventions based on progress

Searle, 2010

role of the rti leadership team

APPLICATION

Role of the RtI Leadership Team
  • Read pages 18-23
  • Identify primary responsibilities of the district RtI Leadership Team
  • Record your team’s top 4 priorities

Assign:

1. Taskmaster

2. Recorder

Assign:

1. Taskmaster

2. Recorder

3. Reporter

Materials Needed:

Jim Wright Book handout pp. 18-23

rti team responsibilities
RtI Team Responsibilities
  • Develop multi year plan for rolling out RtI
  • Monitor and guide the RtI rollout
  • Educate the stakeholders about the model
  • Identify strengths and challenges
  • Inventory resources that can be used to support student intervention planning and progress monitoring
examine a case study

APPLICATION

Why RtI?

Examine a Case Study

Independently:

1. Read the discussion questions

2. Read the case study

With your team:

3. Discuss the case study

4. Complete the graphic organizer

Assign:

Taskmaster

Timekeeper

Recorder

Assign:

1. Taskmaster

2. Recorder

3. Reporter

Materials Needed:

Case Study Packet

slide67

RtI Framework Component 1:

High Quality

Tier I Core Instruction

teacher quality
Teacher Quality

“We live in an era when research tells us that the teacher is the most important factor affecting student achievement - at least the single most important factor that we can do much about.”

Marzano, 2003

core instruction includes
Core Instruction Includes
  • Academics – core program and intervention for all
  • Behavior – classroom management and universal behavioral interventions for all

Addison, and Warger, 2011

why do tier i services need to be strong
Why Do Tier I Services Need to Be Strong?

The expectations and accountability are at an all time high.

why aren t effective tier i services happening
Why Aren’t Effective Tier I Services Happening?

1. Time constraints

2. Content Specialization

3. Characteristics of Secondary Students

4. Lack of Administrative Leadership

what needs to be in place
What Needs to Be In Place?
  • Knowing your standards
  • Aligning your standards
  • Supporting active reading throughout the day
  • Building effective instructional strategies
  • Building effective engagement strategies

Windram, Bollman and Johnson, 2012

ideas for content delivery in engaging secondary classrooms
Ideas for Content Delivery in Engaging Secondary Classrooms
  • Planning Instruction
  • Differentiating Instruction
  • Managing the Environment

Windram, Bollmanand Johnson 2012

identifying teacher behaviors

APPLICATION

Why RtI?

Identifying Teacher Behaviors
  • Listen to the statement
  • As a team, answer using a response card

Response Choices:

        • Engaging - green
        • Emerging - yellow
        • Nonengaging - pink

Assign:

Reporter

Assign:

1. Taskmaster

2. Recorder

3. Reporter

Materials Needed:

Response Cards

learning targets day 11
Learning Targets – Day 1

Did We…

Learn the basics of the RTI Framework:

  • What is RTI
  • Why RTI
  • Where RTI fits with other district initiatives
  • Basic components needed to implement RTI
team assignments
Team Assignments

Assignment #1

Complete Handout Exhibit 2-F: District Resource InventoryThink about:

  • What resources do you already have in place?
  • How does this fit into an RtI Framework
  • What are you missing? This becomes your action plan!
team assignments1
Team Assignments

Assignment #2

Action Plan Form

Page 1:

Develop the Long Term Goal for your building

Page 3:

Complete the section titled:

“Examining and

Strengthening Core

Instruction: Tier 1”

thought for the day
Thought for the Day

“Don’t tell me you believe ‘all kids can learn’…tell me what you’re doing about the kids who aren’t learning.”

Richard DuFour