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North Dakota Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Grades K-12 Adopted June 2011 PowerPoint Presentation
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North Dakota Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Grades K-12 Adopted June 2011

North Dakota Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Grades K-12 Adopted June 2011

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North Dakota Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Grades K-12 Adopted June 2011

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  1. North Dakota Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Grades K-12 Adopted June 2011 Effective July 1, 2013 “After July 1, 2013, all public school districts are expected to provide instruction based on these new content standards. Beginning with the 2014-15 academic year, the state will begin the administration of a new generation of state assessments based on these 2011 content standards.” Dr. Wayne G. Sanstead

  2. So, let’s get on board with the ND Common Core Standards in… NOW!!! 3 2 1

  3. The time is NOW to make plans for the change The Common Core Standards Assessments start in 2014-15 for Mathematics and Language Arts

  4. COUNCIL OF CHIEF STATE SCHOOL OFFICERS (CCSSO) & NATIONAL GOVERNOR’S ASSOCIATION CENTER FOR BEST PRACTICES (NGA CENTER)

  5. Standards Development Process • College and career readiness standards were developed in the summer of 2009 • Based on the college and career readiness standards, K-12 learning progressions developed • Multiple rounds of feedback from states, teachers, researchers, higher education, and the general public • Final Common Core State Standards released on June 2, 2010 • North Dakota adopted the Common Core State Standards in June, 2011

  6. Why are we using the Common Core Standards? • Aligned with college and work expectations • Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order skills • Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards • Benchmarked internationally so that all students are prepared to succeed in our global economy and society • Based on evidence and research

  7. Why is this important? • Consistency Across States • Prepares Students to Compete Globally • Allows for Teacher Collaboration • Allows for Focused Professional Development • Provides an Opportunity to Evaluate Policies that Affect Student Achievement Across States

  8. Design and Organization • Align with best evidence on college and career readiness expectations • Build on the best standards work of the states • Maintain focus on what matters most for readiness

  9. Shift from“What’s Taught” to “What Students Need to be Able to Do” • Solve Problems • Communicate • Adapt to Change • Analyze and Conceptualize • Reflect on and Improve Performance • Work Independently • Create, Innovate, and Critique • Work in Collaborative Teams • Engage in Learning Throughout Life

  10. What the Standards Do NOT Define • How teachers should teach • All that can or should be taught • The interventions needed for students well below grade level • The additional support required for English language learners and students with special needs • Everything needed to be college and career ready

  11. ND Assessment Development Consortiums PARCC SBAC Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers SMARTER Balance Assessment Consortium

  12. Common Core Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in Social Studies/History, Science, & Technical Subjects Adopted by North Dakota June, 2011

  13. Design and Organization of theCollege and Career Readiness (CCR) Anchor Standards • Broad expectations consistent across grades and content areas • Based on evidence about college and workforce training expectations • Range and content

  14. How To Read The Document

  15. Design and Organization Four strands Reading (including Reading Foundational Skills) Literature Informational Text Writing Speaking and Listening Language An integrated model of literacy Media requirements blended throughout

  16. Design and Organization K−12 standards • Grade-specific, end-of-year expectations • Developmentally appropriate, cumulative progression of skills and understandings

  17. Reading Comprehension (standards 1−9) • Standards for reading literature and informational texts • Strong and growing across-the-curriculum emphasis on students’ ability to read and comprehend informational texts

  18. Reading Aligned with NAEP Reading framework

  19. Reading Text Complexity Grade Bands Suggested Lexile Range Suggested ATOS Book Level Range** 2-3 450L – 790L 2.0 – 4.0 4-5 770L – 980L 3.0 – 5.7 6-8 955L – 1155L 4.0 – 8.0 9-10 1080L – 1305L 4.6 – 10.0 11-CCR 1215L – 1355L 4.8 – 12.0 http://www.ccsso.org/Resources/Digital_Resources/The_Common_Core_State_Standards_Supporting_Districts_and_Teachers_with_Text_Complexity.html Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity(standard 10, Appendices A and B) • “Staircase” of growing text complexity across grades • High-quality literature and informational texts in a range of genres and subgenres

  20. Design and Organization Three main sections • K−5 (cross-disciplinary) • 6−12 English Language Arts • 6−12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects Shared responsibility for students’ literacy development Three appendices • A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms • B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks • C: Annotated student writing samples

  21. Reading Foundational Skills Four categories (standards 1−4) • Print concepts (K−1) • Phonological awareness (K−1) • Phonics and word recognition (K−5) • Fluency (K−5) Not an end in and of themselves Differentiated instruction

  22. Writing Writing types/purposes (standards 1−3) • Writing arguments • Writing informative/explanatory texts • Writing narratives Strong and growing across-the-curriculum emphasis on students writing arguments and informative/explanatory texts

  23. Writing Aligned with NAEP Writing framework

  24. Writing Production and distribution of writing (standards 4−6) • Developing and strengthening writing • Using technology to produce and enhance writing Research (standards 7−9) • Engaging in research and writing about sources Range of writing (standard 10) • Writing routinely over various time frames

  25. Language Conventions of standard English Knowledge of language (standards 1−3) • Using standard English in formal writing and speaking • Using language effectively and recognizing language varieties Vocabulary (standards 4−6) • Determining word meanings and word nuances • Acquiring general academic and domain-specific words and phrases

  26. Speaking and Listening Comprehension and collaboration (standards 1−3) Day-to-day, purposeful academic talk in one-on-one, small-group, and large-group settings Presentation of knowledge and ideas (standards 4−6) Formal sharing of information and concepts, including through the use of technology

  27. Key Advances Reading • Balance of literature and informational texts • Text complexity Writing • Emphasis on argument and informative/explanatory writing • Writing about sources Speaking and Listening • Inclusion of formal and informal talk Language • Stress on general academic and domain-specific vocabulary

  28. Key Advances Standards for reading and writing in history/ social studies, science, and technical subjects • Complement rather than replace content standards in those subjects • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects Alignment with college and career readiness expectations

  29. Conclusion Standards: Important but insufficient To be effective in improving education and getting all students ready for college, workforce training, and life, the Standards must be partnered with a content-rich curriculum and robust assessments, both aligned to the ND Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

  30. Conclusion The promise of standards “These Standards are not intended to be new names for old ways of doing business. They are a call to take the next step. It is time for states to work together to build on lessons learned from two decades of standards based reforms. It is time to recognize that standards are not just promises to our children, but promises we intend to keep.” (CCSS for Mathematics)

  31. References • North Dakota Common Core State Standards (DPhttp://www.dpi.state.nd.us/standard/content.shtm • Common Core State Standards Initiative http://http://www.corestandards.org/ • North Dakota Curriculum Initiative • http://ndcurriculuminitiative.org/ • PARCC • http://www.achieve.org/PARCC • SBAC http://www.k12.wa.us/smarter/