Welcome to the Thomas Hardye School - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

salena
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Welcome to the Thomas Hardye School PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Welcome to the Thomas Hardye School

play fullscreen
1 / 31
Download Presentation
Welcome to the Thomas Hardye School
587 Views
Download Presentation

Welcome to the Thomas Hardye School

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

    1. Welcome to the Thomas Hardye School YEAR TEN PARENTS INFORMATION

    2. AQA GCSE SCIENCE All GCSE Science courses from September 2006 are new. Courses have been revised according to the national KS4 strategy. Courses are designed to allow some flexibility in the qualifications the students achieve. The way courses are assessed has changed. In all courses there is a greater emphasis on how science works.

    3. QCA Science Criteria KEY SKILLS application of number communication information technology improving own learning and performance problem solving working with others.

    4. AQA QUALIFICATIONS Triple Award: three GCSE awards in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Science + Additional Science: two GCSE awards, graded separately. Additional Science is science content led. Science + Additional Applied Science: two GCSE awards, graded separately. Additional Applied science is based more in the world of work.

    5. AQA QUALIFICATIONS

    6. QUALIFICATIONS ROUTES

    7. COURSE STRUCTURE

    8. SCIENCE A The specifications for each unit are based on questions. These questions highlight the scientific process and the implications of Science for society Chemistry 1 [C1] How do rocks provide building materials? How do rocks provide metals and how are metals used? How do we get fuels from crude oil? How are polymers and ethanol made from oil? How can plant oils be used? What are the changes in the Earth and its atmosphere? Why have some species of plants and animals died out? How do new species of plants and animals develop? How do humans affect the environment?

    9. SCIENCE A Core to all courses. Assessment is based on six multiple choice objective tests: B1a, B1b, C1a, C1b, P1a, P1b. The tests are available in November, March and June. The tests are 30 minutes long. The tests are are worth 75% of the marks. The other 25% of the marks come from the Centre Assessed Unit (CAU).

    10. SCIENCE A Objective tests: multiple choice, 30 minutes each Students study the scheme of work prepared from the specifications in class and homework. Students revise leading into the tests using past papers and mark schemes. The tests have Higher (A*-D) and Foundation (C-G) sections. Staff will advise students which level they should do for each paper sat. The fill in grid needs to be done very carefully. Students can re-sit a paper.

    11. SCIENCE A CENTRE ASSESSED UNIT (CAU) The assessment has two parts: The practical skills assessment (PSA), 6 marks: Assesses the students ability to work in an organised and safe manner whilst working practically in the laboratory. It can be carried out at any time during the course. 2. The investigative skills assignment (ISA), 34 marks: Assesses the students ability to undertake a task and collect, process and evaluate data. The ISA can be carried out at any time during the course. There are six ISAs to choose from, and we will do two. The Centre Assessed Unit is worth 25% of the marks. Each GCSE qualification has one centre assessed unit.

    12. SCIENCE A PRACTICAL SKILLS ASSIGNMENT (PSA)

    13. SCIENCE A INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS ASSIGNMENT (ISA) Students carry out a practical task set by AQA under normal laboratory conditions. They then take a 45 minute written test under controlled conditions, worth 34 marks. The test asks questions concerning the data collected during the practical task as well as data provided by AQA as part of the test. The test is marked by the teacher using detailed marking guidance from AQA. Students must be fully prepared for this examination. It is essential that they know and understand the specific terminology for scientific investigation.

    14. SCIENCE A INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS ASSIGNMENT (ISA) ISA: lesson 1 Introduction, elicit student ideas and try out kit, students make own notes. lesson 2 Neat copy of students own table. Give out standard method and results table to fill in. Start ISA expt. lesson 3 Continue and finish ISA expt. lesson 4 Repeat checks for ISA expt. if needed. Calculations and graphs/tables. Collect in all work, go over any issues. lesson 5 ISA exam. 45 minutes.

    15. SCIENCE A INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS ASSIGNMENT (ISA) Students are taught key words and use them in exercises in class. Students do experiments and report using the key words. Students have a revision guide with the How Science Works snake. Students are given a vocabulary list that they must learn and be conversant with. Students do exercises with typical ISA questions. Clue Cards are up in all laboratories.

    16. SCIENCE A INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS ASSIGNMENT (ISA) Aim of experiment: to find out how, changes with. Variables: categoric, ordered, discrete, continuous independent, dependent, control ISA questions: 1. What were you trying to find out in this experiment? (2) 2. a) What was the independent variable? (1) b) What type of variable was this? categoric, ordered, discrete, continuous (1) 3. a) In your experiment state one variable it was important to keep the same. (1) How was this variable kept the same? (1) Why was it important this variable was kept the same? (1)

    17. SCIENCE A INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS ASSIGNMENT (ISA) Types of graphs: bar, histogram, line, pie Data: anomalous data repeat checks precision ISA Questions: The students are given a table of results 9a Which would be the best way of representing these results? Choose from bar/line/pie/histogram b There is one anomalous result in the table. Draw a ring around this result. c What should be done about this result? d Which set of results shows the greatest precision? e What was the dependent variable for this experiment?

    18. AQA SCIENCE RESOURCES Class sets of student textbooks Revision guides issued to all students e-learning: Nelson Thornes and Multimedia Science e-assessment package, Nelson Thornes. Specifications, assessment material, markschemes and advice from the AQA website: www.aqa.org.uk

    19. Additional Science A traditional science content led course building on the knowledge and skills from Science A. Assessment is based on three structured papers in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. B2, C2, P2. The tests are available in January and June. The tests are 45 minutes long. The tests are worth 75% of the marks. The other 25% of the marks come from the Centre Assessed Unit (CAU).

    20. Additional Applied Science An alternative to science theory led courses. Builds on knowledge and skills developed in GCSE Science A. Vocational relevance within work related contexts. Focuses on knowledge and skills used in the workplace. Assessed by: one hour structured examination two portfolio units

    21. Additional Applied Science Unit one: Science in the workplace. Portfolio worth 20% of marks. Focuses on how science is used and working safely. Unit two: Science at Work one hour exam worth 40% of marks. Topics: Food science, sports science, forensic science. Unit three: Using scientific skills Portfolio worth 40% of the marks developed while studying the contexts of unit two. Teaching will start in March to two groups of students.

    22. AQA SCIENCE How can you help? At home with class work, home work and a place to study. Help to reinforce the learning of How Science Works vocabulary. Help with revision nearing the test sessions Nov., Jan., March and June. Encourage students to use the AQA website for the specifications and past assessment material.

    23. Thank you for attending the Thomas Hardye School mjanuszewski@thomas-hardye.dorset.sch.uk www.aqa.org.uk

    24. QCA Science Criteria AIMS All specifications must give students opportunities to: acquire a systematic body of scientific knowledge, and the skills needed to apply this in new and changing situations in a range of domestic, industrial and environmental contexts; acquire an understanding of scientific ideas, how they develop, the factors which may affect their development and their power and limitations; plan and carry out a range of investigations, considering and evaluating critically their own data and that obtained from other sources, using ICT where appropriate; evaluate in terms of their scientific knowledge and understanding, the benefits and drawbacks of scientific and technological developments, including those related to the environment, personal health and quality of life, and considering ethical issues; select, organise and present information clearly and logically, using appropriate scientific terms and conventions, using ICT where appropriate.

    25. QCA SCIENCE SPECIFICATIONS Grade F Candidates recall a limited range of information. For example, they state the main functions of organs of the human body, describe some defence mechanisms of the body, state some uses of materials obtained from oil, suggest ways in which insulation is used in domestic contexts. Candidates use and apply knowledge and understanding in some specific everyday contexts. For example, they describe how a reduction in the population of one organism in a habitat can affect another organism, suggest a way of speeding up a particular chemical reaction; explain that fuels are energy resources and that energy is sometimes wasted. Candidates make some use of scientific and technical vocabulary and make simple generalisations from information. Candidates relate scientific explanations to some experimental evidence and describe simple examples of benefits and drawbacks of scientific development. Candidates devise fair tests in contexts, which involve only a few factors. They use simple apparatus to make measurements appropriate to the task and record observations and measurements in tables and graphs. Candidates obtain information from simple tables, charts and graphs and identify simple patterns in information and observations. They offer explanations consistent with the evidence obtained.

    26. QCA SCIENCE CRITERIA Grade C Candidates recall a range of scientific information from all areas of the specification. For example, they describe how some organ systems in living things carry out life processes, recall simple chemical symbols and formulae, recall correct units for quantities. Candidates use and apply scientific knowledge and understanding in some general contexts. For example, they describe how a cell is adapted to its functions, use simple balanced equations, use quantitative relationships between physical quantities to perform calculations. Candidates describe links between related phenomena in different contexts, use diagrams, charts and graphs to support arguments, use appropriate scientific and technical vocabulary in a range of contexts. Candidates describe how evidence is used to test predictions made from scientific theories, and how different people may have different views on some aspects of science. Candidates use scientific knowledge and understanding to identify an approach to a question. For example, identifying key factors to vary and control. Candidates use a range of apparatus to make careful and precise measurements and systematic observations and recognise when it is necessary to repeat measurements and observations. They present data systematically, in graphs where appropriate, and use lines of best fit. Candidates identify and explain patterns within data and draw conclusions consistent with the evidence. They explain these conclusions using scientific knowledge and understanding and evaluate how strongly their evidence supports the conclusions.

    27. QCA SCIENCE CRITERIA Grade A Candidates recall a wide range of knowledge from all areas of the specification. Candidates use detailed scientific knowledge and understanding in a range of applications relating to scientific systems or phenomena. For example, they explain how temperature or water content is regulated in humans, routinely use a range of balanced chemical equations, the particle model to explain variations in reaction rates, use a wide range of relationships between physical quantities to carry out calculations effectively. Candidates draw together and communicate knowledge from more than one area, use routinely scientific or mathematical conventions in support of arguments, use a wide range of scientific and technical vocabulary throughout their work. Candidates explain how scientific theories can be changed by new evidence and identify some areas of uncertainty in science. Candidates use scientific knowledge and understanding to select an appropriate strategy for a task, identifying the key factors to be considered. They make systematic observations in qualitative work and decide which observations are relevant to the task in hand. When making measurements they decide the level of precision needed and use a range of apparatus with precision and skill to make appropriately precise measurements. They select a method of presenting data appropriate to the task; they use information from a range of sources where it is appropriate to do so. They identify and explain anomalous observations and measurements and the salient features of graphs. Candidates use scientific knowledge and understanding to identify and explain patterns and draw conclusions from the evidence by combining data of more than one kind or from more than one source. They identify shortcomings in the evidence, use scientific knowledge and understanding to draw conclusions from their evidence and suggest improvements to the methods used that would enable them to collect more reliable evidence.

    28. QCA SCIENCE CRITERIA ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES AO1 Knowledge and understanding Candidates must be able to: recognise, recall and show understanding of specific scientific facts, terminology, principles, concepts and practical techniques; demonstrate understanding of the power and limitations of scientific ideas and factors affecting how these ideas develop; draw on existing knowledge to show understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of applications of science; select, organise and present relevant information.

    29. QCA SCIENCE CRITERIA AO2 Application of knowledge and understanding, analysis and evaluation Candidates must be able to: describe, explain and interpret phenomena, effects and ideas in terms of scientific principles and concepts, presenting arguments and ideas clearly and logically; interpret and translate, from one form into another, data presented as continuous prose or in tables, diagrams and graphs; carry out relevant calculations; apply principles and concepts to unfamiliar situations, including those related to applications of science in a range of domestic, industrial and environmental contexts; evaluate scientific information and make informed judgements from it.

    30. QCA SCIENCE CRITERIA AO3 Investigative skills Candidates must be able to: devise and plan investigations, drawing on scientific knowledge and understanding in selecting appropriate strategies; demonstrate appropriate investigative methods, including safe and skilful practical techniques, obtaining data which are sufficient and of appropriate precision, recording these methodically; interpret data to draw conclusions which are consistent with the evidence, using scientific knowledge and understanding, whenever possible, in explaining their findings; evaluate data and methods.