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    1. MT8222A BTS Master High Performance Handheld Base Station Analyzer

    2. The challenge accepted by Tektronix and the NetTek is to provide tools for the majority of circumstances. The kinds of tools needed every day. After more than 1 1/2 years of service, the NetTek is pretty well debugged. The hardware has passed the usual round of shake, vibration and drop tests with flying colors even launch from a trabuchet (not yet a mil spec. test). More important, it has passed the field technician daily use test. At this point, hardware issues are rare.The challenge accepted by Tektronix and the NetTek is to provide tools for the majority of circumstances. The kinds of tools needed every day. After more than 1 1/2 years of service, the NetTek is pretty well debugged. The hardware has passed the usual round of shake, vibration and drop tests with flying colors even launch from a trabuchet (not yet a mil spec. test). More important, it has passed the field technician daily use test. At this point, hardware issues are rare.

    3. An Economic Choice So the bottom line is: can we afford to continue to purchase more, and more expensive, service monitors for every new mode? Can we reasonably expect field technicians to remember how to operate instruments they might use once a year? Can we interrupt service when we know the end result will still be replace-the-board? NetTek starts out in the form you need today, and grows into the form you need tomorrow all done in software!So the bottom line is: can we afford to continue to purchase more, and more expensive, service monitors for every new mode? Can we reasonably expect field technicians to remember how to operate instruments they might use once a year? Can we interrupt service when we know the end result will still be replace-the-board? NetTek starts out in the form you need today, and grows into the form you need tomorrow all done in software!

    4. The Technicians Best Friend

    5. Cable/Antenna Problems Problems in the system, such as connector transitions, jumpers, kinks in the cable or moisture intrusion Of all cable and antenna system problems 60% are connector related 20% are cable related 5% are antenna related The BTS Master includes Anritsu Site Master capabilities which is the de-facto industry standard for these measurements

    6. Cable and Antenna Measurements The measurements Return Loss Cable loss Distance To Fault (DTF) 2 Port Gain (TMA/LNA) 2 Port Loss (Duplexer/Diplexer) Precision Calibration OSL Cal Standard open, short, load Flex Cal No recalibration required

    7. The goal of a wireless communications system is to transfer the maximum amount of RF energy in one direction to achieve desired coverage Garden hose and sprinkler To accomplish this, a wireless communications system must Match from an RF standpoint Otherwise, reflections occur Reflections affect the overall performance of our system BTS Master Training Introduction to Line Sweeping - RF Basics Wireless communication systems require the proper integration of several components. For example, antennas are connected to the transmitter/receiver, as well as switching and signal processing equipment by means of a coaxial cable. It is important that these components are matched from an RF standpoint, otherwise reflections occur. Reflections affect the overall performance of our system. If the level of reflections becomes excessive, the quality and performance of our system is greatly degraded. Thus, a wireless communications system is similar to connecting several garden hoses together with a sprinkler. If the hoses and sprinkler are properly matched, the sprinkler distributes water to the outside environment, covering the desired area. If not, the sprinkler either dribbles water out to the outside environment (loss of signal power) or doesnt work at all. Although this example is rather simplistic in form, you get the idea. Just remember that the only good reflection is the one you see when you look at yourself in the mirror!! Wireless communication systems require the proper integration of several components. For example, antennas are connected to the transmitter/receiver, as well as switching and signal processing equipment by means of a coaxial cable. It is important that these components are matched from an RF standpoint, otherwise reflections occur. Reflections affect the overall performance of our system. If the level of reflections becomes excessive, the quality and performance of our system is greatly degraded. Thus, a wireless communications system is similar to connecting several garden hoses together with a sprinkler. If the hoses and sprinkler are properly matched, the sprinkler distributes water to the outside environment, covering the desired area. If not, the sprinkler either dribbles water out to the outside environment (loss of signal power) or doesnt work at all. Although this example is rather simplistic in form, you get the idea. Just remember that the only good reflection is the one you see when you look at yourself in the mirror!!

    8. BTS Master Training Introduction to Line Sweeping - RF Basics What do we mean by Match In a RF/Wireless communications system, it is often necessary to connect various components together to deliver the signal from the transmitter/radio to the antenna Cables, connectors, adapters, etc. Each of the components within the system must match electrically (typically 50 ?) as we are in essence transferring electrical energy 75 ? ? 50 ? What do we mean by Match? From an RF standpoint it is important that we match like things with like things. It is like trying to make sure you have the same color socks on in the morning. Finding out later that you have one blue and one brown sock on is quite a shock. In this sense, there is a definite clash, just as if you connected a coaxial cable with a 75? impedance to one with 50?. Why is this important? Well, in RF systems (wireless systems) the various components that comprise the system each have a characteristic impedance (transmitter/receiver, cable, connectors, antenna, etc.), typically 50?. If we connect all our components together, each having the same 50? impedance, our system will transfer the maximum amount of signal energy. If our system is not properly matched (meaning that our components all exhibited different characteristic impedance's), reflections will occur and the performance of our system will be degraded significantly. Lets go back to our garden hose example. Lets say that we properly matched the various sections of our garden hose to our sprinkler, all with the same, constant resistance. Our result would be a nice flow of water out of the sprinkler, covering the desired area. On the other hand, say we connected several very large-diameter sections of our garden hose to several sections with a very small-diameter. In this case we would in effect have varying resistances within our system, resulting in some of the water to be back-flowed back to where it came from. Obviously this is not a desirable result. Additional info Impedance is essentially the RF/Microwave version of resistance, and is perhaps the most critical component of a transmission line. What do we mean by Match? From an RF standpoint it is important that we match like things with like things. It is like trying to make sure you have the same color socks on in the morning. Finding out later that you have one blue and one brown sock on is quite a shock. In this sense, there is a definite clash, just as if you connected a coaxial cable with a 75? impedance to one with 50?. Why is this important? Well, in RF systems (wireless systems) the various components that comprise the system each have a characteristic impedance (transmitter/receiver, cable, connectors, antenna, etc.), typically 50?. If we connect all our components together, each having the same 50? impedance, our system will transfer the maximum amount of signal energy. If our system is not properly matched (meaning that our components all exhibited different characteristic impedance's), reflections will occur and the performance of our system will be degraded significantly. Lets go back to our garden hose example. Lets say that we properly matched the various sections of our garden hose to our sprinkler, all with the same, constant resistance. Our result would be a nice flow of water out of the sprinkler, covering the desired area. On the other hand, say we connected several very large-diameter sections of our garden hose to several sections with a very small-diameter. In this case we would in effect have varying resistances within our system, resulting in some of the water to be back-flowed back to where it came from. Obviously this is not a desirable result. Additional info Impedance is essentially the RF/Microwave version of resistance, and is perhaps the most critical component of a transmission line.

    9. BTS Master Training Introduction to Line Sweeping - RF Basics What do we mean by reflection? Reflections result from component mismatches. This causes the RF signal to be reflected back to where it came from. Lets go back to our garden hose example again. In this example, a reflection occurs when you take a 1-inch diameter garden hose and hold it up against a 3/4-inch hole- you immediately understand what reflected energy is all about when you turn the water on! Whatever amount of water that cannot fit into the hole will find somewhere else to go. In the case of the hole, the water is more likely to spray back into your face. Again, this is extremely simplified definition of a very important concept. Since the RF signal travels through the transmission line (coaxial cable) similar to that of water in our garden hose example, any imperfections or mismatches will cause a disturbance in the signal flow, resulting in the signal to be reflected back to where it came from. Remember, our goal is to efficiently transmit the maximum amount of RF/Microwave energy, for example, water through the garden hose and ultimately the sprinkler. This occurs when the RF signal energy is flowing in one direction only; either from the transmitter to the antenna, or from the antenna to the receiver. Reflections result from component mismatches. This causes the RF signal to be reflected back to where it came from. Lets go back to our garden hose example again. In this example, a reflection occurs when you take a 1-inch diameter garden hose and hold it up against a 3/4-inch hole- you immediately understand what reflected energy is all about when you turn the water on! Whatever amount of water that cannot fit into the hole will find somewhere else to go. In the case of the hole, the water is more likely to spray back into your face. Again, this is extremely simplified definition of a very important concept. Since the RF signal travels through the transmission line (coaxial cable) similar to that of water in our garden hose example, any imperfections or mismatches will cause a disturbance in the signal flow, resulting in the signal to be reflected back to where it came from. Remember, our goal is to efficiently transmit the maximum amount of RF/Microwave energy, for example, water through the garden hose and ultimately the sprinkler. This occurs when the RF signal energy is flowing in one direction only; either from the transmitter to the antenna, or from the antenna to the receiver.

    10. BTS Master Training Introduction to Line Sweeping - RF Basics How can we tell if our system has a reflection or is not meeting specified performance? Two types of measurements VSWR Measurement Return Loss Measurement VSWR and Return Loss Measurements provide a quick pass/fail measurement of a wireless system. Two basic measurements can be used to determine the performance of your communications system. These are the Standing Wave Ratio (also referred to as VSWR) and Return Loss. Mathematically, you can calculate one from the other. However, let the test equipment do the conversion for you, or use a cheat sheet! Think of the old days, when all you had was the Bird Wattmeter or similar. Two basic measurements can be used to determine the performance of your communications system. These are the Standing Wave Ratio (also referred to as VSWR) and Return Loss. Mathematically, you can calculate one from the other. However, let the test equipment do the conversion for you, or use a cheat sheet! Think of the old days, when all you had was the Bird Wattmeter or similar.

    11. BTS Master Training Introduction to Line Sweeping - RF Basics This table compares various values of VSWR and Return Loss. It is merely an example to illustrate that VSWR measurements are unit-less and are measured in terms of X:1, wherein the lower the value of X, the better the measurement. Conversely, Return Loss measurements are measured in terms of dB and the higher the return loss value, the better the measurement. This table compares various values of VSWR and Return Loss. It is merely an example to illustrate that VSWR measurements are unit-less and are measured in terms of X:1, wherein the lower the value of X, the better the measurement. Conversely, Return Loss measurements are measured in terms of dB and the higher the return loss value, the better the measurement.

    12. Common VSWR and Return Loss Values VSWR RL (dB) Component 1.5:1 -14 Antenna 1.22:1 -20 Lightning Arrestor 1.06:1 -30 Connector 1.01:1 -45 Cable BTS Master Training Introduction to Line Sweeping - RF Basics This table illustrates common or typical values of various components of a cable and antenna system. These are not hard-fast specs of which you should adhere to, they are just merely used to identify common values within the system. Please consult your system specs as outlined by the carrier to determine whether your system is performing adequately. This table illustrates common or typical values of various components of a cable and antenna system. These are not hard-fast specs of which you should adhere to, they are just merely used to identify common values within the system. Please consult your system specs as outlined by the carrier to determine whether your system is performing adequately.

    13. BTS Master Training Line Sweeping Fundamentals In all, there are six measurements that provide the information required to verify the integrity of the transmission line or cable and antenna system Cable Loss (Insertion Loss) of the transmission line. (1) With an open or short connected Return Loss / VSWR of the transmission line (3) With a 50 Ohm termination connected Return Loss / VSWR of the transmission line (5) With Antenna connected DTF-RL/ DTF-SWR of the transmission line (2) With an open or short connected. DTF-RL/ DTF-SWR of the transmission line (4) With a 50 Ohm termination connected. DTF-RL/ DTF-SWR of the transmission line (6) With an Antenna connected. These measurements conditions provide all the types of tests to verify problems in transmission lines (coaxial cable). These measurements conditions provide all the types of tests to verify problems in transmission lines (coaxial cable).

    14. BTS Master Training Line Sweeping Fundamentals Must have three pieces of information to properly conduct a line sweep 1. Frequency Range This can be determined from your system specs Make sure that your antenna matches the specified frequency range 2. Cable Type(s) This can be determined from your system specs Make sure that your cable(s) match the specified cable type 3. Distance of Cable Run This is not always outlined in your system specs, but is important For less experienced line sweepers, it is suggested that you draw out the system before conducting a line sweep Identifying the problems in a cable and antenna system. Measuring a known good cable and antenna system and comparing it to a problematic system. Comparison of the connector transitions within transmission line and how they are effected by changes in impedance and environmental conditions. Identifying the problems in a cable and antenna system. Measuring a known good cable and antenna system and comparing it to a problematic system. Comparison of the connector transitions within transmission line and how they are effected by changes in impedance and environmental conditions.

    15. BTS Master -Cable and Antenna Analysis Measurement Setup Select the Shift key, then the Mode (9) key, using rotary knob or up/down arrow keys select Cable & Antenna Analyzer and press the Enter key to select. Press the Freq/Dist function hard key. Press the Start Freq soft key and enter the desired start frequency manually then press the Stop Freq and enter the desired stop freq, or press the Signal Standard soft key and select the applicable standard. Select the Measurement hard key to select the desired measurement VSWR Return Loss Cable Loss DTF Return Loss DTF VSWR 2-Port Gain Calibrate BTS Master

    16. BTS Master -Cable and Antenna Analysis Measurement Setup Calibration Procedure Select the Shift key, then the Calibrate (2) key, using soft key select Cal Type 1-Port or 2-Port. The selected Cal Type will be underlined. Select 1 port for RTN Loss and DTF Measurements Select 2 port for testing gain and insertion loss of TMAs and Duplexers Select Cal Power High or Low. The selected Cal Power will be underlined. 1 port measurements, low power is the only selection. 2 port measurements, low power or high power can be selected. Select low power for testing active devices such as TMAs. Select high power for testing passives devices such as cables and filters. Select Start Cal soft key to start calibration. Follow instructions provided on the display of the BTS Master. For two port calibrations two loads and two phase stable cables are required.

    17. BTS Master -Cable and Antenna Analysis Setting Limit Lines and Markers Setting Limit Lines Select the Shift key, then the Limit (6) key, using soft key select Limit Upper or Limit Lower. The selected Limit Type will be underlined. Select Limit Edit soft key to set limit. Both an upper and lower limit can be set separately. Select Limit On/Off soft key. Limit state will be underlined. Setting Markers Select Marker hard key to display marker menu. Select Marker soft key to choose marker number. Chosen Marker will be underlined. Selected marker will appear in Red on the display and can be adjusted using the daisy wheel. Non selective markers will appear in Green on the display and can not be adjusted.

    18. BTS Master -Cable and Antenna Analysis Measurement Setup Saving/Recalling Setups Saving Setup Select the Shift key, then the File (7) key, using soft key select Save. Select Directory Management soft key. Select Current Location soft key to select data storage location. Int. Data stored to internal memory of BTS Master USB Data stored to external USB storage device. CF Data stored to compact flash drive. Select Back soft key to return to previous page. Select Save Setup soft key to save setup. Use the daisy wheel or soft keys to name setup. Select the Shift key, then the File (7) key, using soft select Recall. Recalling Setup Select Recall soft key, then highlight desired setup for recall. Select Recall soft key to recall setup.

    19. BTS Master Return Loss Measurement

    20. BTS Master DTF Measurement Procedure Press Measurement hard key Select DTF RTN Loss soft key Press Freq/Dist hard key Select Cable soft key and choose the appropriate cable from the cable list. Press Enter Key Select the Stop Dist soft key and enter the estimated distance of the transmission system Press the More soft key to enter unit preference meter or ft.

    21. BTS Master Distance to Fault Measurement

    22. TMA Measurement Tower Mounted Amp/Masthead Amplifiers Testing On Tower Testing-RTN Loss By Pass Circuitry- AMP in By Pass Mode No By- Only TX Band will be swept Pre-installed TMA Testing Two port gain measurement

    23. TMA Measurements Typical TMA Configurations Simplex Configuration Used in antenna systems that have separate RX and TX antennas and separate feed lines to the base station. Single Duplex Configuration Used in antenna systems that have a common RX and TX antenna and separate feed lines for the RX signal and TX signal to the base station. Dual Duplex Configuration Used in antenna systems that have both a common RX and TX antenna and a common transmission line to the BTS.

    24. TMA Measurements BTS Master Set-up Procedure TMA Gain Testing TMA Prior to Installation (Two Port Gain) Press the blue Shift key then press the Mode (#9) key then select Cable and Antenna Analyzer. Press the Measurement hard key then select 2-port Gain. Press Freq/Dist hard key then select Start Freq soft key to set the start freq next select Stop Freq soft key to set stop frequency. Press the blue Shift key then press the Cal (#2) key. Set Cal Type to 2-port and set Cal Power to Low. Start Calibration. Connect the RF Out port of the BTS Master to the Antenna port of the TMA and connect the RF In port to the BTS port of the TMA. Press the Shift key then press the Sweep (#3) key, then select Bias Tee soft key. Set the required Bias Tee Voltage (+12 to +24), then set the Bias Tee to On. Press the Shift key then press the Sweep (#3) key, then select Bias Tee soft key. Set the required Bias Tee Voltage (+12 to +24), then set the Bias Tee to On.

    25. TMA Measurements Interpreting TMA Gain Measurement 10 to 12 dB Gain in RX Band Check Manufactures Spec Reference Level equals 0 dB Green Line Bias T On Top Slide Bias T Off Bottom Slide

    26. BTS Master BTS Power Measurements High Accuracy Power Meter PSN50 .16 dB of Accuracy 50 MHz to 6 GHz freq -30 dB to +20 dB USB Interface Internal Power Meter .5 dB Accuracy No External Power Head

    27. Cable & Antenna Measurements

    28. Cable & Antenna Measurements

    29. Cable & Antenna Measurements

    30. Basic Transmitter Measurements For basic measurements the BTS Master will be directly connected to the base station. (connect directly to RF out with an attenuator or use Test/Monitor connector) Use a 30 or 40 dB attenuator on RF output

    31. GSM/EDGE RF/Demod Measurements RF measurements Spectrum display Pass/Fail Slot Timing Mask Complete Frame view Demodulation measurements Demodulation display GSM, GMSK EDGE, 8PSK EVM Phase Error Carrier to Interference Pass/Fail mode Create custom test sets

    32. BTS Master GSM/EDGE Measurements - Setup Select the Shift key, then the Mode (9) key, using rotary knob or up/down arrow keys select GSM/GPRS/EDGE Signal Analyzer and press the Enter key to select. Press the Freq function hard key. Press the Center Freq soft key and enter the desired frequency manually, or press the Signal Standard soft key and select the applicable GSM standard. Select the Channel soft key and use the Up/Down arrow keys, the keypad, or the rotary knob to select a channel number for the selected signal standard. The center of the channel is tuned to the center of the display. Press the Setup function hard key. Press the GSM/EDGE Auto to automatically select the GSM or EDGE signal. Press the Amplitude hard key to set the power offset. In put Power Off Set when external attenuator is used. Set Auto Range to ON. BTS Master will automatically adjust attenuation.

    33. BTS Master SM/EDGE Measurements Setup Press the Select Reference Frequency soft key to display a list of the available reference frequencies and select the desired reference frequency to get accurate frequency measurements as described in the previous section or Activate the GPS to get High Accuracy frequency error measurements. GPS Setup Install the Anritsu GPS antenna to the GPS antenna connection on the BTS Master connector panel. Select the Shift key, then the Mode (8) key. Select GPS soft key to view GPS settings. Select GPS On/Off to activate the GPS. Selected state will be underlined. Select the GPS Info key to view the GPS information. Number of Tracked Satellites Latitude Longitude Altitude Select the Measurement hard key to select the desired GSM Measurement.

    34. GSM/GPRS/EDGE Measurements MT8222A offers two GSM/GPRS/EDGE measurements that will each be addressed separately in the following guide: GSM/GPRS/EDGE RF Measurements, with the MT8222A connected directly to the base station or to an antenna GSM/GPRS/EDGE Demodulator Measurements, with the MT8222A connected directly to the base station or to an antenna.

    35. GSM/GPRS/EDGE RF Measurements GSM RF measurements are useful to quickly view the RF signal characteristics of the GSM carrier GSM RF Measurements consist of: Spectrum Measurements GSM Channel Spectrum Multi-channel measurements Power versus time (frame), Power versus time (slot)

    36. GSM/EDGE Channel Spectrum The GSM Channel Spectrum and multi-channel measurements. Include: Channel Power Occupied Bandwidth Burst Power Frequency Error Modulation Type (GMSK for GSM and 8PSK for EDGE) Training Sequence Code (TSC) Channel Spectrum Key Strokes Press the Measurements function hard key. Press the Spectrum soft key to activate the spectrum measurement Select Channel spectrum for a single channel view or Mutli-channel spectrum key to display the multiple channels in a 2MHz span

    37. GSM/EDGE Power Versus Time (Frame) The GSM Power versus Time Frame shows the 8 GSM time slots bursts or the combined EDGE time slots and GSM voice time slots bursts. . Include: Channel Power Occupied Bandwidth Burst Power Frequency Error Modulation Type (GMSK for GSM and 8PSK for EDGE) Training Sequence Code (TSC) Power versus Time (Frame) Key Strokes Press the Measurements function hard key. Press the Power vs. Time (Frame) soft key to activate the Power vs. time Frame measurement.

    38. GSM/EDGE Power Versus Time (Slot) The GSM/EDGE Power vs. Time Slot shows: Single GSM/EDGE timeslot with a mask The rise and fall of the timeslot are the vertical signal traces within the mask The top flat section is the data burst. It is very important that the rise and fall of the timeslot falls within the mask, if there is too much variation then timeslot collisions may occur, causing degraded signal quality. Power versus Time (Frame) Key Strokes Press the Measurements function hard key. Press the Power vs. Time (Slot) soft key to activate the Power vs. time Slot measurement.

    39. GSM/GPRS/EDGE Demodulator GSM/GPRS/EDGE demodulator demodulates the GSM/GPRS/EDGE signal and displays a constellation diagram showing the Phase and Amplitude vector changes in a graphical display. The GSM/GPRS/EDGE demodulator measurement displays: Phase error, Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) - (EDGE only) Origin Offset (EDGE only), Carrier to Interferer (C/I) - (EDGE only) Modulation type Magnitude error GSM and GPRS GMSK modulation EDGE uses 8PSK modulation GMSK modulation only has a Phase Shift vector parameter, the constellation diagram it looks like a ring 8PSK modulation has both a Phase Shift and Amplitude Shift for its vector parameters, in the constellation diagram EDGE tends to look like a plate of spaghetti Demodulator Key Strokes Press the Measurements function hard key. Press the Demodulator soft key to activate the Demodulator measurement.

    40. GSM/GPRS/EDGE/TDMA RF Measurements

    41. GPS GPS hardware Provides location information (longitude, latitude, altitude) for storage with traces. Required for high accuracy frequency error measurements when measuring Over-The-Air. High Accuracy measurements Standard Accuracy: 0.3 ppm GPS Accuracy: < 0.025 ppm High Accuracy: < 0.025 ppm, <24 Hrs after GPS disconnect < 0.05 ppm, <72 Hrs after GPS disconnect

    42. Spectrum Analyzer Wide Frequency Range Specified 100 kHz to 7.1 GHz Usable down to 9 kHz Low Phase Noise -100 dBm/Hz @ 10 kHz offset Low Displayed Average Noise Level (DANL) -153 dBm typical @ 1 GHz in 10 Hz RBW Wide Dynamic Range >80 dB

    43. Interference Analyzer Applications To find intermittent interference To identify and locate an interferer To measure the signal strength over time Measurements Spectrogram Spectrogram allows engineers and technicians to identify intermittent interfering signals that cause dropped calls Can measure a signal down to -153 dBm Save data up to 72 hours Signal Strength Locate an interfering signal based on signal strength RSSI Measure signal strength over time Measure the signal up to 72 hours

    44. Power Measurements For power measurements the BTS Master will be connected to the base station directly. (connect directly to RF out with an attenuator or use Test/Monitor connector) Use a 30 or 40 dB attenuator on RF output

    45. Power Measurements Power Meter (base model) Channelized power meter Only measure actual channel Based on spectrum analyzer circuitry Calculated from real shape No external probe required Pass/Fail view Set Pass/Fail tolerance Easy Red or Green display Power Monitor (Option) For Microwave Backhaul Broadband power Can measure power up to 50 GHz Needs external detector

    46. Channel Scanner Applications Measure multiple channels transmitted signals power Easy setup for channel equalization Precise channel leveling improves system performance Easy Uplink, Downlink view Display Display 20 channels power as bar graphs or in table format Sequential Scan Stepped Channel Scan Custom Scan Uplink/Downlink Scan Max Hold See Max hold of each channel Display either current or max value

    47. Bit Error Rate Measurements For T1 measurements the BTS Master will be connected to the base stations Network interface directly. (direct connect for Testing or Monitoring)

    48. T1/E1 Measurements Capabilities Carrier, frame sync and pattern sync have color LED indicators. Frequency of the E1 or T1 carrier is displayed Make BERT measurements Histogram display for fault correlation Send Loop codes Can listen to VF channels Analyzer ITU-T G.821 analysis Errored seconds Severely errored seconds Unavailable seconds Available seconds Error free seconds Degraded minutes

    49. PC and LAN connectivity The MT8222A includes the Master Software Tool program for management of all results on the PC The BTS Master has both USB and Ethernet connectivity easy retrieval of results data The Flash Memory Card (included) can store 64Mbyte of data

    50. Master Software Tools 1 Easy access to traces/results 2000 plus stored results in instrument The user can View multiple traces/results Zoom into a trace in both amplitude and frequency Overlay traces on one graph Save traces/results on computer GPS support with maps Requires Microsoft Map point program View Map with GPS info and Data Report Feature All the measurement parameters are listed Export graphic files for use in other programs Export text data files for use in spreadsheets Print graphs on any local or network printer

    51. Master Software Tools 2 All editors are combined Signal standard Editor, Antenna table Editor, Cable table Editor, Language Editor, 7 standard plus 2 custom Pass/Fail Editor for Test model set-ups All editors allow editing and upload into the instrument Installation options for: Users Guide, Programming Manual, App. notes, Copy of current firmware version, Measurement conversion utility, Remote Access tool, Dot Net Framework Integrated codeloader with automatic web updates Under Tools, webupdate