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Burma humanitarian crisis

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    1. Advocacy for Child Protection and Education for Burmese Children

    2. Burma humanitarian crisis Military oppression and human rights violation 40% of national expenditure continues to fund military Economic discrimination and poverty Collapse of health and education systems

    3. Impact on children welfare Widespread poverty - over 70% of average Burmese household income is spent on food alone. The highest rates of infant and child mortality in the region. Most deaths are easily preventable such as malaria and diarrhea. Over one-third of Burmese children are malnourished. People displaced to neighboring countries, approximately 600,000 IDPs in Eastern Burma and 2 million in Thailand

    4. Impact on children welfare (cont:) Almost 38 percent of children between the age of five and nine never enroll in school and almost three quarters fail to complete school in Burma.

    5. Children denied their rights Children are deprived of their right to have an education. Children deprived of the right to live with their family and receive care from family and society. Children denied the right to legal status. Military offensives in eastern Burma have forced schools to close. due to military activities, displacement, economic hardship, and impacts from human rights abuses. Large number of stateless children in Eastern Burma and Thailand. According to IOM report estimate that 200,000 of migrant children in Thailand Military offensives in eastern Burma have forced schools to close. due to military activities, displacement, economic hardship, and impacts from human rights abuses. Large number of stateless children in Eastern Burma and Thailand. According to IOM report estimate that 200,000 of migrant children in Thailand

    6. Childrens Situations Difficult on both sides of the Border Migrant Children in Thailand1: Caught in Poverty Cycle Child Labor Social Welfare Problems Health and Nutrition Impact Limited Education Opportunities Trafficking Domestic Violence Abandoned Children

    7. Life for Children in Burma The SPDC burnt the place where I lived and many people were homeless and didnt have enough food. I had to struggle to escape with my life. Because of SPDC cruelty I felt pain in the chest and my mind was always agitated. 17 year old boy attending migrant High School

    8. CBO response: Child Rights Community Schools and Teacher Training Boarding Houses Birth registration and certification Child rights training Child protection research and advocacy Child Protection Policy Development Child referral system to ensure intervention for at-risk children According to the need of the children, these are community response for child rights both migrant and IDP children.According to the need of the children, these are community response for child rights both migrant and IDP children.

    9. Community Response: Formal Education in Karen State Karen State Education Assistance Group has recently been formed to locate materials assistance and teachers' subsidies needed for schools in the seven districts of Karen State. KSEAG consists of Karen Education Department, Karen Teachers Working Group (KTWG) and Partners, supporting over 1,000 schools with 70,000 students and 3,500 teachers in Karen State. In response to this crisis, the KSEAG is an example of effective cross border collaboration. Some might have the impression that it is not possible to be effective in collaborating in the conflict and rural mountainous areas of Burma. However, KSEAG has succeeded in supporting both community managed schools and government controlled schools. In response to this crisis, the KSEAG is an example of effective cross border collaboration. Some might have the impression that it is not possible to be effective in collaborating in the conflict and rural mountainous areas of Burma. However, KSEAG has succeeded in supporting both community managed schools and government controlled schools.

    10. Education in Karen State Supported by KSEAG Those schools are both community response schools and government control school. Most of government schools are in the miss admistration area. Those schools are both community response schools and government control school. Most of government schools are in the miss admistration area.

    11. Challenges KSEAG aims to provide 4,000 baht (US$120) per teacher per year, until now only able to provide 1500 baht (US$45) per teacher per year Education level of teachers needs to be upgraded to develop quality of education through pre-service and in-service training Funding for Karen language text book production needed These are some difficulity according to funding limitation for cross border assistant. The teachers in IDP area have to be a person from those area.These are some difficulity according to funding limitation for cross border assistant. The teachers in IDP area have to be a person from those area.

    12. Community Response: Formal Education, Migrant Areas Burmese Migrant Workers Education Committee was formed in 1999, to coordinate and advocate for education for migrant children in the Mae Sot area In 2009, there are 44 migrant school members with 8820 students enrolled 27 schools up to primary level, 7 schools up to middle school level, 7 to high school level, 2 post ten schools and one special education school Every year the student population increases by about 20% In the official refugee camps, children can access to education but in migrant area the children cannot access to education. Because the parents always moving according to job available. Some time because of low minimum wage, the children become child labors. According to BMWEC data in 2009-20010 academic year, only 8,820 students are attend the migrant school under the BMWEC. In the official refugee camps, children can access to education but in migrant area the children cannot access to education. Because the parents always moving according to job available. Some time because of low minimum wage, the children become child labors. According to BMWEC data in 2009-20010 academic year, only 8,820 students are attend the migrant school under the BMWEC.

    13. Burmese Migrant Workers Education Committee Achievements Fundraise and support for 27 migrant schools In-service teacher training in collaboration with Burmese, Thai and international organisations Coordinate with the Thai Ministry of Education to plan for accreditation of schools Education policy for migrant schools

    14. Challenges 17 schools have no funding for this school year Securing long term funding Student drop out rate is 10-20% each year due to parental pressures Security of teachers, students and schools Diverse education and experience background of students and teachers

    15. Childrens Boarding Houses Reasons children live in boarding houses Nearest middle school to their home is too far away Fighting in their village in Burma School closures in Burma Fear of forced labor by the Burmese regime Cost of Education in own area in Burma Poverty in the home Pressure to work Family violence To increase access to basic education, and create a protective environment in schools and boarding houses (BHs) for displaced children from Burma To increase access to basic education, and create a protective environment in schools and boarding houses (BHs) for displaced children from Burma

    16. Boarding House Working Group CTDCE was set up in 2006 to increase access to basic education, and create protective environment in schools for displaced children from Burma. CTDCE created the Boarding House Working Group. The Boarding House Working Group is an example of Community Based Collaboration. Our observation is that this collaboration has brought many benefits both to the students and CBOs involved. A very tangible outcome has been the improvements to sanitation and living conditions in the boarding houses. (for information only) The Role of the Working Group: Facilitating of meeting between coordination team and working group Preparation of proposal Responsibility of both financial and narrative reporting Regular meeting with working group for rapid dispersal of fund the emergency needs Develop policies for minimum standard for schools and boarding houses Monitoring and Evaluation The Boarding House Working Group is an example of Community Based Collaboration. Our observation is that this collaboration has brought many benefits both to the students and CBOs involved. A very tangible outcome has been the improvements to sanitation and living conditions in the boarding houses. (for information only) The Role of the Working Group: Facilitating of meeting between coordination team and working group Preparation of proposal Responsibility of both financial and narrative reporting Regular meeting with working group for rapid dispersal of fund the emergency needs Develop policies for minimum standard for schools and boarding houses Monitoring and Evaluation

    17. Stateless Children Large numbers of children on both sides of the border lack registration. Those born outside a health facility typically do not have a registered birth. It is estimated that 200,000 Burmese children are living in Thailand (Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2006, HRDU, NCGUB) The majority of them do not have a valid birth certificates. They are designated as Stateless Children according to International Human Rights Law. They lose their basic human rights and rights of citizenship. For example, some Burmese children cannot enroll at Thai school because they have no evidence of civil registration.

    18. Collaboration Example: CPPCR CPPCR, a Burmese CBO is working to assist stateless Burmese children, specifically regarding birth registration CPPCR with Burma Lawyers Council. Thai Lawyers Socitey & Thai Public Health personnel helps stateless Burmese children access birth registration documents. From July 2003 to December 2008 - over 13,000 children were registered at CPPCR CPPCR is working on both sides of the border. In Burma, they work indirectly with Local Health Departments, Local Village Administration, and Local Midwives to support child registration Starting August 23rd, all children born in Thailand are entitled to get a birth certificate but in reality there are many obstacles to this such as lack of awareness of policy, quality of implementation, illegal status and security concerns, etc.

    19. Conclusion Collaboration has led to: Minimum standards of care, overall improved standard of care Policy development Improved fund raising capacity Increased consistency of monitoring and service delivery Creation of psychosocial and technical support network for education and child protection Collaboration within NGO support network has improved It is our observation that collaboration between the Community Based Organizations is the necessary way forward. Although it can be difficult to coordinate with numerous organizations, we are already seeing the benefits. The nature of the border area with transient populations and many different issues to address means that one organization cannot solve issues alone. It is our observation that collaboration between the Community Based Organizations is the necessary way forward. Although it can be difficult to coordinate with numerous organizations, we are already seeing the benefits. The nature of the border area with transient populations and many different issues to address means that one organization cannot solve issues alone.

    20. The Burmese regime signed the Convention of the Child, but have failed to provide protection to children The government chooses to expend only ??% on education Children continue to be placed at risk because of the regimes military offensives and economic mismanagement. For children to have improved access to education, long term investment in schools is needed Child Rights issue should be more strongly monitored and supported by the international community. Work should be through existing local community organizations who have been actively addressing the issues Focus should be on the quality of education, psychosocial rehabilitation, and social integration of displaced children While the current collaboration has been led by the community based organizations, there is a need for involvement and support from the INGOs and international community. It should be encouraging that the CBOs provide the network and capacity for work undertaken by the international community. Finally, the CBOs have the greatest need for international support to monitor child rights, human rights abuses, and humanitarian issues which are best addressed by international voices and multilateral discussions. While the current collaboration has been led by the community based organizations, there is a need for involvement and support from the INGOs and international community. It should be encouraging that the CBOs provide the network and capacity for work undertaken by the international community. Finally, the CBOs have the greatest need for international support to monitor child rights, human rights abuses, and humanitarian issues which are best addressed by international voices and multilateral discussions.

    21. CDC School and Boarding Houses are a reflection of the increases in childrens needs across the region

    22. Students Registered in BMWEC schools (2007/2008)

    23. Boarding House Working Group Impact through Fundraising and Collaboration: Dry Food Rations, Improved Sanitation, and Living Conditions

    24. Childrens future hopes and dreams1 To see Burma develop and have human rights That Burma becomes a democratic country People can live a full life peacefully, can work, receive justice People unified and live in harmony together Can stay with family, wont have to leave To be educated and use this for Burma Not to feel small in their life Also to help people in Thailand 1 From Child Protection Research, CPPCR, December 2008

    28. Thank you For more information: Please contact - Dr. Cynthia Maung Mae Tao Clinic P.O. Box 67, Mae Sot, Tak 63110 Thailand. Ph: 055 563644, Fax: 055 544655 Email: win7@loxinfo.co.th Web: www.maetaoclinic.org

    29. Karen Education Department/Karen State Education Assistance Group: kedktl@yahoo.com; Saw Lah Say