What Matters Most of All: Student Learning Outcomes and Accreditation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. Tina Marshall-Bradley Claflin University Accreditation, Accountability, and Quality An Institutional Orientation and Professional Development Conference September 27-30, 2007 What Matters Most of All: Student Learning Outcomes and Accreditation

  2. Questions to Consider • How is your professional education unit documenting student learning outcomes? • What are the differences in program assessments on student learning outcomes? • What are the data points from initial programs and advanced programs that show impact candidates have on student learning? • What is the best way to present the data on candidates’ impact on student learning outcomes?

  3. Introduction • The purpose of preparing educators • Why student learning outcomes are a part of the accreditation process. • NCATE’s definition of student learning outcomes • Meeting the standard • Initial programs • Advanced programs • Resources for institutions

  4. Overview “Assessment literates know that the first question they must answer is, “What do I want to assess?” Only with that answer in mind can they determine how best to assess it. . . . (T)hey must be prepared to use the full range of assessments to track student achievement, including selected response, essay, performance, and personal communication-based assessment formats. Teachers must know how to select an appropriate assessment method for their particular context and understand when to use it and why it fits best.” Richard J. Stiggins Assessment Training Institute Portland, Oregon,

  5. Intent of the standard • the intent is to focus teacher preparation on P-12 student learning • the goal is to assure that subject content knowledge, teaching skills, and dispositions will effectively advance student learning, not be ends in themselves. • impact on student learning must be demonstrated as a part of the unit assessment system as well as a part of program reviews* *For those institutions who participate in the Specialized Professional Association (SPA) review process or state review processes that require programs to document candidates’ impact on student learning.

  6. Standards Review • Student Learning for Teacher Candidates • Standard 1: Element 7 (Acceptable) • Teacher candidates focus on student learning as shown in their assessment of student learning, use of assessments in instruction, and development of meaningful learning experiences for students based on their developmental levels and prior experience.

  7. Initial and Continuing Preparation Teachers • Initial teacher candidates – teacher candidates develop the knowledge bases for analyzing student learning and practice by collecting data and assessing student learning through case studies and field and other experiences. • Continuing candidates – experienced teachers in graduate programs build upon and extend their knowledge and experiences to improve their own teaching and student learning in classrooms.

  8. Standards Review • Student Learning for Other Professional School Personnel • Standard 1: Element 8 (Acceptable) • Candidates for other professional school roles are able to create positive environments for student learning. They understand and build upon the developmental levels of students with whom they work; the diversity of students, families, and communities: and the policy contexts within which they work

  9. Educational technology specialists Instructional technology specialists Reading specialists and supervisors School administrators, including principals and curriculum and instruction specialists School counselors School library media specialists School psychologists School superintendents Other professional school roles Other Professional School Personnel

  10. Other Professional School Personnel • Other professional school personnel are able to create and maintain positive environments, as appropriate to their professional responsibilities, that support student learning in educational settings.

  11. Candidates demonstrate the ability to: • JUDGE PRIOR LEARNING—undertakes a systematic assessment to understand the prior P-12 student learning in the area he or she will teach; • PLAN INSTRUCTION—plans an appropriate sequence of instruction to advance P-12 student learning, based on the prior assessment; • TEACH—teaches P-12 students to acquire and use content knowledge in meaningful ways, engaging those who bring differing background knowledge and learning needs, and providing students opportunities to demonstrate the use of critical and creative thinking skills; Elliott, E. (1995) Student learning in NCATE accreditation, NCATE Institution Resources.

  12. Candidates demonstrate the ability to Cont. • ASSESS—conducts a concluding objective test or alternative assessment(s); • ANALYZE—analyzes the results of the concluding assessment(s), documenting the student learning that occurred at individual and group levels, including explanations of results from students who learned more or less than expected, and results from each subgroup of students; and • REFLECT—reflects on changes in teaching that could improve results. Elliott, E. (1995) Student learning in NCATE accreditation, NCATE Institution Resources.

  13. Areas for Improvement (Standard Met) • Candidates’ effect on student learning is not clearly assessed across all programs. • The unit lacks sufficient documentation that all candidates develop meaningful learning experiences to help all students learn. • The unit does not collect evidence that candidates have a positive effect on student learning. • (Advanced preparation) Candidates’ impact on student learning is not explicitly assessed.

  14. Areas for Improvement (Standard Not Met) • The unit has very little aggregated data regarding candidate impact on P-12 student learning. Areas for improvement when the standards are met or not met

  15. Questions & Answers • How is your professional education unit documenting student learning outcomes? • What are the differences in program assessments on student learning outcomes? • What are the data points from initial programs and advanced programs that show impact candidates have on student learning? • What is the best way to present the data on candidates’ impact on student learning outcomes?

  16. Resources • Student Learning in NCATE Accreditation – Emerson J. Elliott • http://www.ncate.org/documents/articles/EducationWeeek0105.pdf • Sample Institutional Reports • http://www.ncate.org/institutions/sampleInstitReport.asp?ch=22 • Program Assessments – Student Learning • http://www.ncate.org/institutions/assessmentExamples.asp?ch=90