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DRUGS AND THEIR EFFECTS. What is a Drug?. A drug is any substance—solid, liquid or gas—that brings about physical and/or psychological changes in the body. What drugs do you think are most commonly used by secondary school students?. 2008 Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol & Drug Survey.

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Presentation Transcript
what is a drug
What is a Drug?
  • A drug is any substance—solid, liquid or gas—that brings about physical and/or psychological changes in the body.
  • What drugs do you think are most commonly used by secondary school students?
2008 australian secondary students alcohol drug survey
2008 Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol &Drug Survey
  • Analgesics (painkillers) were the most commonly used substance, with 95% of students having used them in their lifetime, 68% using them in the past month, and 38% having used them in the past week.
  • 3% of students aged 12 to 17 years reported having ever used amphetamines (speed)– a low rate compared to use of alcohol (84%) and tobacco (29%).
  • 19% of students reported they had deliberately sniffed inhalants at least once in their lifetime, 8% reported use in the past month.
2008 australian secondary students alcohol drug survey1
2008 Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol & Drug Survey
  • Across all 12- to 17-year-olds, 12% stated they had used cannabis in their lifetime.
  • 4% of 12- to 17-year-old students reported having ever used ecstasy in their lifetime.
  • 3% of all 12- to 17-year-old students reported having ever used hallucinogens in their lifetime.
  • Overall, 2% of 12- to 17-year-old students reported having ever used cocaine in their lifetime.
slide5

Did any of these results from the 2008 Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol and Drug Survey surprise you?

types of drugs
Types of Drugs

1. Stimulants

2. Depressants

3. Hallucinogens

stimulants
Stimulants
  • Make you feel more awake and alert.
  • Increase your heart rate, body temperature and blood pressure.
  • May make you feel agitated, keep you awake, decrease your appetite and dilate your pupils.
  • If you take a large amount of a stimulant drug you can become anxious, paranoid, aggressive and get stomach cramps.
stimulants1
Stimulants
  • tobacco
  • caffeine
  • amphetamines (eg speed or methamphetamine, ICE) 
  • ephedrine (Sudafed)
  • cocaine
  • ecstasy (MDMA)
depressants
Depressants
  • Slow down your reaction to things.
  • Taken in small amounts they may make you feel more relaxed.
  • Taken in large amounts they may cause you to pass out as they slow down your breathing and heart rate or may cause nausea, vomiting and even death.
  • Mixing depressant drugs may be dangerous and increases the likelihood of overdose.
depressants1
Depressants
  • alcohol
  • GHB (Gamma hydroxybutyrate)
  • opiates and opioids, including drugs like heroin, opium, morphine, codeine and methadone
  • cannabis (marijuana, hashish, hash oil)
  • sedatives and hypnotics (including valium and rohypnol) 
  • barbiturates
  • some solvents and inhalants, like petrol, glue, lighter fluids and paint thinners
hallucinogens
Hallucinogens
  • Hallucinogens may change people's perceptions of reality. During this time, people may experience visual or auditory hallucinations.
  • It is impossible to predict whether your hallucinations are likely to be positive or unpleasant. It is not uncommon to experience anxiety, panic or paranoia during an hallucination.
  • It is also difficult to predict the length and frequency of the hallucinations. You may still be having them for up to 24 hours or for periods after this time.
  • Losing contact with reality may cause people to have accidents and take risks they wouldn't normally take.
hallucinogens1
Hallucinogens
  • LSD (acid, trips)
  • Magic mushrooms
  • Cannabis may have hallucinogenic effects when taken in large amounts as well as depressant effects.
role play in pairs
Role Play in Pairs
  • Aim: To develop refusal strategies

Becis 15, she is at an 18th birthday party with her best friend Sally.

Bec’sparents have let her attend provided she does not drink and is ready to be picked up at 12.00. This is the first party with alcohol that they have let her attend without them.

At 10.30pm Sally offers Beca drink. Sally has already drunk a couple.

refusal tactics
Refusal tactics
  • Making an excuse
  • Changing the topic
  • Saying you’re not allowed
  • Making a joke of it
  • Saying you will let them know later
  • Walking away
  • Look like you’re drinking
  • Getting others on your side
  • Asserting your own opinion