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PBIS Maryland. Using the Problem-Solving Logic to Build a Culture of Support for Implementation of Practices November 10, 2011 Dr. Patti Hershfeldt Sheppard Pratt Health System. Road Map.

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slide1

PBIS Maryland

Using the Problem-Solving Logic to Build a Culture of Support for Implementation of Practices

November 10, 2011

Dr. Patti Hershfeldt

Sheppard Pratt Health System

road map
Road Map
  • How will we use the problem-solving logic to build a culture to support implementation of these practices?
  • Based on data what practices & systems exist to support enhanced classroom environments?
  • How can you empower the team to empower others to address classroom systems – a schoolwide concern?
s w o t
S.W.O.T.

VDOE ESD Project 1/30/11

slide4

As a coach, so far you have supported your team and worked to implement Tier 1 or universal supports. As part of universal, we need to support teachers to implement positive behavioral interventions and supports aligned with school-wide in their classrooms.

slide5

How will we use the problem-solving logic to build a culture to support implementation of these practices?

slide6

PBIS Problem-Solving Logic

Support

Staff Behavior

Support

Decision

Making

DATA

+ Culture

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Support

Student Behavior

Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, University of Oregon, 2002; Bill Bixby, Prince William County Schools

slide7

Using the Problem Solving Logic

Support

Decision

Making

DATA

+ Culture

slide8

Roles: ADMINISTRATOR and Coach

DATA

How will you support ALL teachers to implement evidence-based practices aligned with PBIS in the classroom?

  • Gather initial data- Assessment, Learning Walk, Survey
  • Get buy-in (baseline data, strategic plan, articles/research)
  • With team, use data to identify need and plan to provide professional learning (Practice Mini Modules/Snapshots on wiki)
  • Create support system (e.g., peer observation dyads/triads)
  • Gather Data- performance feedback
  • Present fidelity and outcome data-CELEBRATE
what does the data say in your building
What does the data say in your building?
  • Review Data- Office Referrals by location
    • Where are most referrals coming from in your school?
  • Classroom Self Assessments
  • Peer observation and feedback (peer coach, buddy)
  • Administrator Walk Through
  • Learning Walks
administrative walk through learning walk peer observation plc self assessment
Administrative Walk Through, Learning Walk, Peer Observation, PLC, Self-Assessment
  • Information gathering, not evaluative
  • Data can be gathered by someone other than an administrator too- What does the culture support?
observation feedback self monitoring tool
Observation Feedback/Self-Monitoring Tool

Use a seating chart & record when a student is given an opportunity to respond to an academic question. Tally whole group opportunities to respond.

building classrooms systems moving it forward
Building Classrooms Systems: Moving it forward…
  • DATA
  • This school year (before MSA/HSA)
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • For the 2012-2013 school year (using summer planning time)
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • 2-3 year long term plan
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • Reflect
  • Engage with these ideas
  • Dialogue about what they mean for us
slide23

Using the Problem Solving Logic

PRACTICES

Support

Student Behavior

Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, University of Oregon, 2002.

longitudinal research
Longitudinal Research
  • 102 schools in 7 western US States and District of Columbia. Typical range of ethnicity, SES, and community risk
  • 126 Elementary Schools
  • Research Question: What teacher behaviors and school practices represent the conditions for student learning, and predict important student and school outcomes, such as adequate yearly progress (AYP)?
findings
Findings
  • In schools where 80% of students reported the presence of the “B’s”(clear expectations, positive relationships, academic and social basic skills, and recognized and rewarded effort), schools were 2 to 8 times more likely to achieve AYP, experience higher levels of academic achievement, school safety, and student attendance.

(Center for the School of the Future at Utah State University, 2010)

findings1
Findings
  • The 4 “B’s” account for 2/3 of the variance of academic achievement:
    • Four times more than community risk
    • Five times more than parent support
    • 15 times more than teacher qualifications
    • 37 times more than school leadership
    • 60 times more than school resources
    • The strongest relationships were found for young and disadvantaged learners
how are the b s defined
How are the B’s defined?
  • Clear expectations- Clearly communicating expectations for performance and explaining the step by step reward contingencies for acceptable behavior
  • Positive relationships- Establishing and maintaining staff-to-student relationships based upon mutual respect and positive regard
  • Building basic academic, social, and self-management skills, making coercive practices largely unnecessary
  • Recognition and Rewards- Actively recognizing appropriate behavior and individual efforts to improve whenever and wherever they occur throughout the school environment

(Center for the School of the Future at Utah State University, 2010)

what are the classroom practices aligned with pbis
What are the classroom practices aligned with PBIS?
  • Classroom rules/expectations are defined, posted, taught, and aligned with school-wide expectations (teaching matrix)
  • Routines and Procedures
  • Multiple Opportunities to Respond (OTRs)
  • Continuum of responses to encourage appropriate behavior (acknowledgement, signaling, cueing, pre-correction, teaching matrix, and flowchart)
  • Continuum of responses to discourage inappropriate behavior (correction, contingent instructions flowchart)

(Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, 2008)

how do you choose practices
How do you choose practices?
  • Data
  • Don’t forget beliefs, strengths …
  • Apply principles of behavior
    • Remember me?
    • What impact might the principles of behavior have on practice selection?
slide32
Developing a plan for creating aninstructional environment that predictspositive behavior in place of problems
  • Create environments that predict success (teaching matrix, routines)
  • Teach replacement behaviors (teaching matrix)
  • Facilitate success (clear, predictable routines, rules, feedback)
  • Provide functional consequences for positive & negative behaviors (flowchart)
  • Monitor effectiveness of plan (data, PBIS Team)
classroom behavior instruction plan
Classroom Behavior Instruction Plan

Prevention first (antecedents)

  • If you could have $10,000 if it happened tomorrow . . .

Effective Instruction (Behavior)

  • Do they know it and can they do it
  • Show them how (model), engage them, teach it, tell them why and when

(Scott, 2006)

what practices are in place
What practices are in place?
  • What evidence-based practices do classroom teachers have in place?
  • How do you know?
  • Do teachers need additional tools (evidence-based practices)?
  • How do you know?
  • Snapshots!!!
slide36

Tiers of Support In a Classroom

FEW

Pre-correct

SOME

Cueing

Wait time

ALL

Clear expectations

aligned w/SW

Visual Reminders

Mult. opportunities

to respond

Positive Feedback ratio

4:1

slide37

Tiers of Support In a Classroom

FEW

Working w/Families

SOME

CICO +

  • Working with T2 Teams

CICO

Cooperative Learning

Groups

Academic Seminar

  • CICO Plus = Academic or Social Instructional Groups
slide38

Tiers of Support In a Classroom

FEW

ACTIVITY

Data Collection and Progress

Monitoring at T3

FBT/BIP

  • Role on the IST
building classrooms systems moving it forward1
Building Classrooms Systems: Moving it forward…
  • PRACTICES
  • This school year (before MSA/HSA)
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • For the 2012-2013 school year (using summer planning time)
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • 2-3 year long term plan
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • Reflect
  • Engage with these ideas
  • Dialogue about what they mean for us
slide40

Using the Problem Solving Logic

Support

Staff Behavior

SYSTEMS

Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, University of Oregon, 2002.

roles administrator and coach systems
Roles: ADMINISTRATOR and CoachSYSTEMS
  • With team, use data to identify need and plan to provide professional learning (Practice Mini Modules/Snapshots on wiki)
  • Create support system (e.g., peer observation dyads/triads)
what is needed
What is needed?

Staff feedback and input ..we must stop and apply R.E.D.

Time to …

Reflect

Engage with these ideas

Dialogue about what they mean for us

will the system of support reflect the culture of the school
Will the system of support reflect the culture of the school?
  • Options for support systems
    • Staff Professional Development during staff meetings, staff days, grade level/core/department meetings based on data
    • Administrative walk throughs/learning walks
    • Peer observation triads or dyads
    • Self-assessment (e.g., video or audio recording)
  • Which system(s) would fit best with the culture in your school?
  • How will you identify and/or build models to support staff learning?
slide45
What are some effective ways in which to support teachers to implement best classroom management practices?
  • Explicit instruction to include:
    • The Why?
    • Models
    • Range of examples
  • Time to practice to build fluency
  • Periodic self-assessment, progress monitoring to progress monitor and fidelity check- performance feedback
  • Observation and other feedback
  • Strategies that promote self-management

(Simonsen, Myers, & DeLuca, 2010)

slide46

In what ways might you use the Practice Snapshots to provide professional development (e.g., workshop, grade level/core/department meetings, peer coaching triads or dyads, professional learning communities, other coaching) to staff?

peer observation triads or dyads
Peer observation triads or dyads
  • Does the school culture support this type of system of support?
  • In what ways could you map this onto an existing infrastructure of support (e.g., professional learning communities, grade level/core/department team meetings)?
how might you begin something like this in your school
How might you begin something like this in your school?
  • Start with volunteers- may need uncommon planning time
  • As a coach, facilitate learning for the ways in which we conduct observation, collect data, and provide feedback
  • Arrange a time to observe peer teacher in the classroom
how does this work
How does this work?
  • Assess: Collect data on teacher/student behaviors (Practice Snapshots)
  • Provide feedback: Preferably on the same day, provide feedback using data collected
  • Collaboratively design a menu of options
    • Snapshots
    • Student/Teacher T-Chart
    • Other resources used in your building
how does this work1
How does this work?
  • Choose an intervention to implement
    • Design a checklist if necessary
  • Teacher to select a self-monitoring tool for own behavior (included on many Practice Snapshots)
  • Performance feedback- continue to collect data and monitor progress, make decisions about interventions
practice snapshots
Practice Snapshots
  • Designed to include components identified as increasing the likelihood of changing teacher practices
    • Definition of practice-what is it?
    • Research- why bother, what’s in it for me?
    • Examples and non-examples
    • Self-monitoring tools
    • Data collection tools
slide54

PBIS

Problem-Solving Logic

Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

OUTCOMES

Systems Supporting Staff Behavior

  • Team Approach
  • Administrator participation
  • Community of Practice (Skill development and performance feedback)
  • Peer Observations
  • Data Supporting Decision Making
  • office discipline referrals
  • academic progress
  • Attendance, truancy
  • direct observation
  • school improvement goal progress
  • Process tools (fidelity)

DATA +

Culture

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Practices Supporting Student Behavior

  • Define behaviors, expectations, and rules
  • Teach, model, and acknowledge behaviors, expectations, and rules-EXPLICITLY
  • Correct behaviors consistently and respectfully
  • Consensus/collaboration
how will you take this back to engage in a conversation with your team
How will you take this back to engage in a conversation with your team?
  • What data will you use?
  • What infrastructure will you map onto?
  • Time for R.E.D
building classrooms systems moving it forward2
Building Classrooms Systems: Moving it forward…
  • SYSTEMS
  • This school year (before MSA/HSA)
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • For the 2012-2013 school year (using summer planning time)
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • 2-3 year long term plan
    • 1.
    • 2.
  • Reflect
  • Engage with these ideas
  • Dialogue about what they mean for us
references
References

Garmston, R.J., & Wellman, B.M. (2009). The adaptive school: A sourcebook for developing collaborative groups. Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon Publishers, Inc.

Hershfeldt, P.A., Rosenberg, M.S., & Bradshaw, C.P.(In press). Function based thinking: A systematic way of thinking about function and its impact on classroom behavior. Beyond Behavior.

Simonsen, Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, G. (2008). Evidence-based practices in classroom management: considerations for research to practice. Education and Treatment of Children, 31 (3), 351-370.

Sprick, R., Knight, J., Reinke, W.M., & McKale, T. (2006). Coaching Classroom Management: Strategies and Tools for Administrators and Coaches. Pacific Northwest Publishing.

Sprick, R. Garrison, M., & Howard, L. (1998). CHAMPs: A proactive and positive approach to classroom management.Pacific Northwest Publishing.