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Women in Agriculture Programming Efforts in West Virginia Brandy Brabham , Extension Agent, Extension Instructor, West Virginia University Extension Service Jodi Richmond, Extension Agent, Extension Assistant Professor, West Virginia University Extension Service

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Where We’ve Been


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    1. Women in Agriculture Programming Efforts in West Virginia Brandy Brabham, Extension Agent, Extension Instructor, West Virginia University Extension Service Jodi Richmond, Extension Agent, Extension Assistant Professor, West Virginia University Extension Service Jennifer Williams, Program Director, Extension Associate Professor, West Virginia University Extension Service Where We’ve Been Where We Are Where We Are Going * West Virginia County Agents Survey Results In 2010, we conducted a survey of West Virginia University Extension Agents that are responsible for Agriculture and Natural Resources Programming in each of the 55 Counties in West Virginia to determine the current level of Women in Agriculture (WIA) programming, previous efforts, topics of most interest to women in their areas and opportunities for potential growth for women in agriculture. There was a 47% response rate for our survey. Of those that responded, 57% was men and 43% were men. Forty-six percent had over 10 years of experience, 8% had between 5 and 10 years of experience, and 46% had 5 years or less experience in Extension. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents said that they had seen an increased interest in agriculture-related topics from women over the last five years in their county or region, 20% said they had not seen an increase, and 12% were not sure. As of February 2010, respondents reported four WIA events planned for 2010 across West Virginia, which shows the trend of planned WIA events continuing in West Virginia. The chart below shows the areas for potential growth for women in agriculture in West Virginia including value added products, direct marketing, local food production, specialty crop production and livestock production. The top other agricultural production and marketing opportunities for women in agriculture in West Virginia and the most common areas of interest for women involved in agriculture in West Virginia are also identified below. Top Other Agricultural Production and Marketing Opportunities Specialty Livestock Production Organic Production Equine Management Historic Perspective of Women in Agriculture in West Virginia West Virginia women have always played an important role in sustaining a strong food system. Husbands and wives on West Virginia farms have maintained a close partnership and shared responsibilities for the farm throughout the years. However, women’s roles have evolved over the years. Historically, and in some cases as few as one generation removed, the women were the managers of the household, where meals were prepared and the children were raised. In addition to these responsibilities, women also were in charge of light agricultural duties such as managing the dairy and poultry operations—milking, gathering eggs and making butter and cheese. They were also in charge of disposing of any surplus through trade or commerce. As a part of the female revolution, women's roles became that of the bookkeeper and the financial manager. Today, they are not only full working partners in farm operations, but also increasingly owner operators. As women’s roles in agriculture have evolved, the differences in farming characteristics of women and their male counterparts have begun to be documented by the US Census of Agriculture. Common Areas of Interest for WV Women in Agriculture Horticulture (gardening, specialty crops, flowers, etc) Small Ruminant Production Farm & Financial Management * Source: 2007 USCensus of Agriculture