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Types of Leaves

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  1. Types of Leaves

  2. Ginkgo • Family: Ginkgoaceae • Genus: Ginkgo • Species: biloba • Scientific name: Ginkgo biloba

  3. MAPLES Family: Aceraceae Genus: Acer

  4. MAPLES Seeds!!

  5. Most maples have simple palmate leaves • Ex: Red maple: Acer rubrum

  6. Some maples have compound leaves • Box elder maple: • Acer negundo • Paper bark maple • Acer griseum • Papery bark, peels, looks like cinnamon

  7. MAPLES • For species of maples and scientific names, see the tree ID list. • To identify specific species, use field guides, the internet, or talk to Mrs. McCarrey about using her book to compare leaves.

  8. SYCAMORES (aka plane trees) • Family: Platanaceae • Genus: Platanus • Can be confused with maples; the difference is the sycamores don’t have the classic maple seeds and sycamores have very distinctive bark that looks like dried and cracked mud (right) or sometimes sloughs off (below)

  9. OAKS • Family: Fagaceae • Genus: Quercus

  10. OAKS • Seeds = acorns

  11. BEECHES • Family: Fagaceae • Genus: Fagus • Typically have a smooth gray bark (like an elephant, but smoother!) • Classic beech leaves have wide-spread veins in a pinnate leaf and are pubescent on margins and bottom of leaf.

  12. Left and below: leaves and tree of weeping willow WILLOWS • Family: Salicaceae • Genus: Salix • Usually have narrow, pointed leaves (except for pussy willows) • Seeds: catkins (in spring) • Some “weep” (but not all – this is true of weeping willows and corkscrew willows” Above and right: catkins

  13. Cottonwoods & Poplars • Family: Salicaceae • Genus: Populus • Tall, grow by water, cottonwood seeds in spring • Deeply furrowed bark

  14. ASPEN • Family: Salicaceae • Genus: Populus • Species: Populustremuloides • Classic white bark with black lines on it; live in clumps (clonal) • Leaves: flat, soft teeth, pointed

  15. Birches • Family: Betulaceae (same family as alders and hornbeams) • Genus: Betula (alder genus: alnus, hornbeam genus: Carpinus) • Serrated leaves • Usually have white bark (paper birch bark peels like paper, weeping birches have deeply serrated teeth and white bark with black lines)

  16. Pine Trees • Family: Pinaceae • Genus: Pinus • Needles usually come in fascicles/bundles of 2, 3, or 5 (rarely as 1) and are usually 2” or longer • Pinecones • Needles in 2s: Austrian, Bosnian Red Cone, 2-needle pinyon, Scots/Scotch • Needles in 3s: Jeffrey and Ponderosa • Needles in 5s: Bristlecones, Limber

  17. Spruces • Family: Pinaceae • Genus: Picea • Needles are shorter than pine needles; come in bundles/fascicles of 1 • Pokey/sharp needles (typically stiffer than pine needles) • Blue spruce: Piceapungens

  18. Cedars • Family: Pinaceae • Genus: Cedrus • More elegant appearing than pines/spruces; boughs often droop with age • Needles are whorled in clusters of at least 20

  19. Firs and Douglas Firs • Family: Pinace • Genus for firs: Abies • Genus for Douglas-fir: Pseudotsuga • Fur needles are soft and not sharp; less stiff than spruces “firs are friendly!” • Fir cones are papery (douglas fir cones have little “tails” on the paper) Left: white fir cone Right: Douglas fir cone

  20. Horsechestnuts/Buckeyes • Family: Sapindaceae • Genus: Aesculus • Compound palmate leaves with either 5 or 7 leaflets; seeds are spikey balls • Good shade trees

  21. Elms • Family: Ulmaceae • Genus: Ulmus • These have prolific papery seeds (seeds almost look like petals) • Many species are messy (lots of sap, pollen, and seeds) • Serrated pinnate leaves with widely spread veins; leaf is asymmetrical where it comes off of the petiole

  22. Linden • Family: Tiliaceae • Genus: Tilia • Key features: light serration on leaves, leaves usually asymmetrical (slightly heart shaped) where blade comes off of petiole, leaves have a petal which accompanies them and dries out/turns yellow/white as summer progresses

  23. Walnut trees • Family: Juglandaceae • Genus: Juglans • In Utah there are two main types: • English walnut (Juglansregia) • Black Walnut (Juglansnigra) • Compound leaves Walnut seeds in spring/summer 

  24. Fruit Trees • Family: Rosaceae • Same family as rosebushes • Many different cultivars or breeds (often people label cultivars or specific types by adding a word to the end of the scientific name, e.g. Tiliacordatagreenspire, but you don’t have to identify this cultivar)

  25. Hawthorn • Family: Rosaceae • Genus: Crataegus • Serrated leaves of varying shapes, small round berries that birds eat

  26. Pear • Family: Rosaceae • Genus: Pyrus • Common pears are European pear Pyruscommunis (has fruit) and Bradford pear (tiny non-edible fruits)

  27. Apple • Family: Rosaceae • Genus: Malus • Includes crabapples (right) and apples (below)

  28. Plum, cherry, apricot, peach • Family: Rosaceae • Genus: Prunus

  29. Rowan • Family: Rosaceae • Genus: Rowan • In legend, rowan wood is used to ward off witches (see The Last Apprentice series).

  30. Image sources • BYU TREE TOUR website http://treetour.byu.edu/map.aspx • Wikimedia commons • Google images when first two sources were inadequate to portray key characteristics