augmentative and alternative communication aac program n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Los Angeles Unified School District PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Los Angeles Unified School District

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

Los Angeles Unified School District - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 112 Views
  • Uploaded on

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Program. Los Angeles Unified School District. Presented by: Meghan O’Brien, M.S. CCC-SLP, AAC Consultant Meghan Dewey, M.S. SLP, AAC Consultant. Outcomes of this presentation. Participants will:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Los Angeles Unified School District' - rufus


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
augmentative and alternative communication aac program
Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) ProgramLos Angeles Unified School District

Presented by: Meghan O’Brien, M.S. CCC-SLP, AAC Consultant

Meghan Dewey, M.S. SLP, AAC Consultant

outcomes of this presentation
Outcomes of this presentation
  • Participants will:
    • Understand how AAC supports students’ access to the curriculum
    • Understand what types of students are appropriate for AAC
    • Understand how an AAC assessment is conducted
agenda
Agenda
  • What is Language and Speech therapy in LAUSD?
  • What is Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)?
  • Who requires AAC to access the curriculum?
  • Types of AAC
  • How to access AAC
  • Communication functions for curriculum access
  • How to request an assessment
speech and language program
Speech and Language Program
  • School language and speech therapy supports the educational program of students who have a communication disorder that adversely affect their educational performance.
language and speech includes
Language and Speech includes
  • Articulation/Phonology
  • Language
  • Fluency (Stuttering)
  • Voice
what is aac
What is AAC?
  • “The supplementation or replacement of natural speech and/or writing with a variety of symbols, strategies, and techniques” (Lloyd, Fuller & Arvidson, 1997).
who is aac for
Who is AAC for?
  • Students with complex communication needs who are/have:
    • Physically involved but cognitively able
    • Multiply involved with unknown cognitive abilities
    • Physically able but motor speech or language delayed
    • Pre-verbal or emergent-verbal
    • On the autism spectrum
    • Developmentally delayed
    • Exhibiting behavior disorders related to inability to communicate effectively
    • Severe speech sound production difficulties
  • AND who have difficulty accessing their curriculum in the absence of AAC support

www.lburkhart.com

types of aac no tech
Types of AAC: No-Tech
  • Any AAC system that does not require a power source
types of aac low tech
Types of AAC: Low-Tech
  • Requires a source of power; often used to encourage early communication skills
types of aac mid tech
Types of AAC: Mid-Tech
  • Requires a source of power; has more vocabulary than low-tech systems
types of aac high tech
Types of AAC: High-Tech
  • Electronic devices that permit the storage and retrieval of messages.
aac access
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access1
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access2
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access3
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access4
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access5
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access6
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access7
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access8
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
aac access9
AAC: Access
  • Direct selection
    • Pointing with physical contact
      • Finger
      • Stylus
      • Mouthstick
    • Pointing without physical contact
      • Eyegaze
      • Lightpointer
      • Headmouse
    • Symbol pickup and exchange
  • Indirect selection
    • Scanning with single or dual switches
    • Directed scanning
      • joystick
what leads to successful aac use
What leads to successful AAC use?
  • Frequent, consistent use in a variety of settings (e.g., school, home, community) to discuss motivating topics.
  • Aided language stimulation (Goosens & Crain, 1986):
    • Provide user with a model of the system in use
    • Allow user to see AAC symbols in everyday situations
    • Suggest to the user that the system is an acceptable means of communication
how to support the needs of your aac user
How to support the needs of your AAC user
  • Augmented communicators describe a ‘good’ communication partner as patient, motivated, interested, and comfortable with all methods of communication
  • Sometimes communication partners underrate their abilities, shout at them as though they are deaf, over enunciate, and/or talk to others instead of addressing them directly

Blackstone, 1999

how to request an aac assessment
How to request an AAC assessment
  • AAC support is the responsibility of the school site speech-language pathologist (SLP)
  • Request screening from SLP
  • If appropriate, assessment plan will be generated and sent home for signature
  • IEP will be held within 60 days to determine if student requires AAC to access his/her curriculum