best practices to recruit and retain talented faculty l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Best Practices to Recruit and Retain Talented Faculty PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Best Practices to Recruit and Retain Talented Faculty

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 31

Best Practices to Recruit and Retain Talented Faculty - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 227 Views
  • Updated on

Best Practices to Recruit and Retain Talented Faculty. Gloria Thomas Associate Project Director American Council on Education Old Dominion University Women’s Caucus Workshop November 28, 2007. Agenda for Workshop. Share data on why the need to consider best practices nationally

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Best Practices to Recruit and Retain Talented Faculty


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Best Practices to Recruit and Retain Talented Faculty Gloria Thomas Associate Project Director American Council on Education Old Dominion University Women’s Caucus Workshop November 28, 2007

    2. Agenda for Workshop • Share data on why the need to consider best practices nationally • Present how Old Dominion University compares to other research universities regarding policies and practices that help recruit and retain faculty • Share some national best practices in career flexibility

    3. Ph.D. Recipients from US Universities, by Race/Gender (US Citizens): 1973-2005

    4. US Full-Time Faculty & Ph.D. Recipient Diversity: 2005

    5. US Full-Time Faculty, by Sector: 2005

    6. US Full-Time Faculty, by Carnegie: 2005

    7. The Baby Lag for UC Women Faculty in Pursuit of Tenure Hire Date Hire Date Years Before Hire Date Years After Hire Date N=2340 Men 982 Women *Year 0 represents Assistant Professor Hire Date Source: Mason, Mary Ann, Angelica Stacy, and Marc Goulden. 2003. “The UC Faculty Work and Family Survey.” (http://ucfamilyedge.berkeley.edu).

    8. Women, Women, Men, Early Late or No Early Babies Babies Babies Tenured 53% 65% 77% Professors Second Tier Part-Time, 2-Year Faculty, Non-Ten. 47% 35% 23% Track, Acad. Researchers, and Still Tenure Track Heads and Necks of Science PhD Recipients* N=2848 N=3057 N=13058 *PhDs from 1978-1984 Who Are Working in Academia 12 to 14 Years Out from PhD Source: Survey of Doctorate Recipients. Sciences, 1979-1999.

    9. Women, Women, Men, Early Late or No Early Babies Babies Babies Tenured 58% 71% 78% Professors Second Tier Part-Time, 2-Year Faculty, Non-Ten. 22 42% 29% Track, Acad. % Researchers, and Still Tenure Track Heads and Necks ofHumanities and Social SciencePhDs* N=4155 N=2973 N=7452 *PhDs from 1978-1984 Who Are Working in Academia 12 to 14 Years Out from PhD Source: Survey of Doctorate Recipients. Sciences and Humanities, 1979-1995.

    10. Family Status of Tenured Faculty, All Fields* Women Men N=10,652 N=32,234 *PhDs from 1978-1984 Who Are Tenured 12 Years out from PhD. **Had a child in the household at any point post PhD to 12 years out. Source: Survey of Doctorate Recipients. Sciences, 1979-1999, Humanities, 1979-1995

    11. Leaks in the Academic Pipeline for Women* Assistant Professor (Tenure Track) Associate Professor (Tenured) Full Professor (Tenured) Graduate School Entry PhD Receipt Women PhDs Water Level Women PhDs Water Level Women PhDs Water Level Leak!! Leak!! Leak!! Leak!! Women, Married (21% less likely than single women to enter a tenure-track position) Women (27% less likely than men to become an Associate Professor) Women (20% less likely than men to become a Full Professor within a maximum of 16 years) Women with Babies (28% less likely than women without babies to enter a tenure-track position) *Preliminary results based on Survival Analysis of the Survey of Doctorate Recipients (a national biennial longitudinal data set funded by the National Science Foundation and others, 1979 to 1995). Percentages take into account disciplinary, age, ethnicity, PhD calendar year, time-to-PhD degree, and National Research Council academic reputation rankings of PhD program effects. For each event (PhD to TT job procurement, or Associate to Full Professor), data is limited to a maximum of 16 years. The waterline is an artistic rendering of the statistical effects of family and gender.

    12. Everybody is Very Busy (UC Faculty, ages 30-50)Under-Represented Minorities Only N=33 50 17 36 Source: Mason, Mary Ann, Angelica Stacy, and Marc Goulden. 2003. “The UC Faculty Work and Family Survey.” (http://ucfamilyedge.berkeley.edu).

    13. Policies to Help Faculty Manage Work and Life • Active Service-Modified Duties (ASMD) or Partial Relief from Duties (78%) • Tenure Clock Stop (96%)* • Paid Leaves for Biological Mothers (86%)* • Paid Leaves for Adoptive Mothers (62%) Number in ( ) represents the percentage of 55 research universities that applied for the 2005-06 Sloan Awards that have these policies in place. *indicates ODU has policy in place.

    14. Policies to Help Faculty Manage Work and Life • Paid Leaves for Biological Fathers (58%) • Paid Leaves for Adoptive Fathers (60%) • Disability policy for serious illness or injury (91%)* • MOUs stating faculty member’s expectations during leaves (61% always or sometimes)*

    15. Policies on Part-time Appointments • Part-time appointments for tenure-track and tenured faculty (49%) • Part-time appointment with budget line protected to return to full-time (73%) • Written policies re workload for faculty with part-time appointment (71%) • Written policies re tenure-related productivity for part-time faculty (50%)

    16. Other Benefits & Practices • Health insurance for opposite-sex unmarried partners (33%) • Health insurance for same-sex partners (63%) • Phased retirement (49%) • Seminars and workshops for graduate students to consider careers in academe (some or great extent-89%)

    17. Possible Areas of Focus for ODU • Assess faculty needs, desires, knowledge and use of policies and practices already in place. • Consider reduction of duties without loss of pay for personal life occurrences (i.e., family care or personal disability). • Consider an extension of probationary period when necessary.

    18. ODU Areas of Focus • Develop written statement for internal and external review committees indicating no penalty for faculty use of tenure clock stop. • Consider paid leave policy for parents who adopt. • Consider automatic stop of tenure clock when faculty are on leave

    19. OSU Areas of Focus • Consider part-time tenure-track or tenured faculty appointments. • Consider benefits for unmarried and/or same-sex partners. • Consider phased retirement with proportional pay.

    20. Other Best Practices • Track and monitor faculty use of all policies in place to assure users are not penalized and ROI. • Offer child care and back-up care; raise funds for stipends to help defray care during professional travel. • Dual career recruitment consortia (HERC)

    21. Duke University • Goal #1: Create new career flexibility policies and programs. • Goal #2. Expand and improve current career flexibility policies and programs • Goal #3: Increase the number of faculty using flexibility policies and programs • Goal #4: Broaden acceptance of career flexibility within the Duke community

    22. Lehigh University • Goal #1: Increased understanding by faculty of Lehigh’s career flexibility policies including the variety of ways in which the Family and Medical Leave and other policies may be utilized to match work/family needs and aspirations.

    23. Lehigh University • Goal #2: Broader and deeper support by departments and college promotion and tenure committees, for utilization of Lehigh’s career flexibility policies. • Goal #3: Promoting higher rates of faculty retention, use of FML policy, and success in tenure.

    24. Lehigh University • Goal #4: Increased success in identifying career-track positions for partners/spouses of tenure-track faculty. • Goal #5: Expanded scope of the regional dual-career consortium to engage dialogue regarding career flexibility strategies.

    25. University of California (Berkeley and Davis) • Goal #1: A Comprehensive Educational Campaign • Goal #2. Implementation of Necessary Mechanisms to Assure Equitable Policy Use

    26. University of Florida • Goal #1: New Career Flexibility Policies and Programs • Goal #2: Expand and Improve Current Policies and Programs • Goal #3: Increase the Number of Faculty Using these Policies and Programs • Goal #4: Widen acceptance

    27. University of Washington • Goal #1: Piloting an option for new biological fathers and for adoptive parents of both genders for the purpose of bonding that will permit the coverage of classroom responsibilities. • Goal #2: Expanding leadership development workshops for chairs and emerging leaders.

    28. University of Washington • Goal #3: Increasing the number of faculty using these policies by making deans and department chairs accountable for the work-family climate of their respective colleges and departments. • Goal #4: Creating a tracking mechanism for policy use and faculty career outcomes.

    29. University of Washington • Goal #5: Using flexible policy options as a faculty recruitment tool. • Goal #6: Assessing the "fit" between faculty eligible to use a policy and those actually choosing to do so and, if needed, improving faculty perception of the family-friendliness of the University.

    30. University of Washington • Goal #7: Creating a peer support group for "new mom" faculty members. • Goal #8: Increasing the number of infant and toddler child care slots available to faculty.

    31. For further information • Go to http://www.acenet.edu/programs/sloan • Or contact: Gloria D. Thomas Associate Project Director ACE Center for Effective Leadership 202-939-9404 gloria_thomas@ace.nche.edu