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Overview of HAZCOM & Lab Safety Training. Hazardous Communication Chemical Hygiene Plan - Chemical Storage - Avoidance of Routine Exposures - Behavior in the Laboratory Personal - Habits in the Laboratory Housekeeping Examples of Laboratory Accidents Chemical Waste Procedures

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Overview of hazcom lab safety training l.jpg
Overview of HAZCOM & Lab Safety Training

  • Hazardous Communication

  • Chemical Hygiene Plan - Chemical Storage - Avoidance of Routine Exposures - Behavior in the Laboratory Personal - Habits in the Laboratory

    • Housekeeping

  • Examples of Laboratory Accidents

  • Chemical Waste Procedures

  • Incident Reporting

  • SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Hazcom what is it l.jpg
    HAZCOM - What is it?

    • Standard issued by OSHA

    • Ensures that employers are communicating and identifying physical and health hazards associated with hazardous chemicals in the workplace to the employees (YOU)

    • Office of Risk Management requires HAZCOM in SD.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Labels l.jpg
    Labels

    • What do labels tell us about the chemical?

    Name of Material

    Health Hazards

    Supplier’s

    Name/Address

    Physical Hazards

    Much More

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Importance of labeling l.jpg
    Importance of Labeling

    • To identify hazards in your

    • work area.

    • Labels must be on every bag, barrel, bottle, box, can, cylinder, drum, storage tank, etc.

    • NFPA ratings should be on each container via the Chemistry Storeroom.

    • Notify your supervisor or safety representative if there are no labels on a container.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    What are physical hazards l.jpg
    What are Physical Hazards?

    • Flammable

    • Combustible

    • Compressed Gas

    • Oxidizer

    • Unstable

    • Water Reactive

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    What are health hazards l.jpg
    What are Health Hazards?

    Carcinogens

    Teratogens

    Asphyxiates

    Corrosives

    Irritants

    Sensitizers

    Toxic

    Target Organ Effects

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    How chemicals enter the body l.jpg
    How Chemicals Enter the Body

    • Ingestion – swallowing the chemical

    • Inhalation – breathing in the chemical

    • Absorption – chemical soaks through the skin

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


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    Corrosives

    • A chemical that causes visible destruction of or irreversible alterations of living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact.

    • Amines, Acids

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


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    “Target Organ” Chemicals

    • A chemical capable of adversely affecting a specific “target organ” of the body.

    • Capable of adversely affecting one or multiple organs of the body.

    • Xylene - Kidney, Liver, Central

    • Nervous Systems

    • Isocyanates - Lungs.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Oxidizers l.jpg
    Oxidizers

    • Reactive chemical that releases oxygen and accelerates combustion.

    • They may be corrosives, irritants, toxins, sensitizers, etc.

    • Oxygen, peroxides.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


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    Poisons/Toxics

    • Poisons are likely to cause death or serious injury if they are swallowed, inhaled, or come in contact with the skin. May interfere with oxygen distribution in the bloodstream.

    • Can enter the body through inhalation, absorption, or ingestion.

    • Methanol, carbon monoxide

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Carcinogens l.jpg
    Carcinogens

    • A substance capable of causing or producing cancer in humans or animals.

    • Exposure to a carcinogen can, over time, cause changes in cell division within the body that leads to uncontrolled cell growth.

    • Formaldehyde, crystalline

    • silica, benzene

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


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    HMIS/NFPA Codes

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Hmis nfpa labeling l.jpg
    HMIS/NFPA Labeling

    What is the difference?

    HMIS

    NFPA

    • Diamond Shaped

    • Address hazards presented by short-term, acute exposures to a material during handling under conditions of fire, spill, or similar emergencies.

    • Rectangular shaped

    • Address acute occupational exposure

    • “PPE Section” is at the bottom

    • Bottom section is used to indicate special hazards

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


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    NFPA - Special Hazards

    • Diamond shaped labels include a fourth hazard class called Special Hazards. This hazard class is colored WHITE.

    • These special hazards are represented by the following symbols:

    • Water Reactive

    • OX – Oxidizer

    • Radioactive

    COR – Corrosive

    ACD – Acid

    ALK - Alkali

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Slide16 l.jpg
    HMIS

    • Personal Protective Equipment

    • Ranges from A to K (pictograms)

      A - Safety Glasses

      B - Safety Glasses and Gloves

      C - Safety Glasses, Gloves, Apron

      D - Safety Glasses, Face Shield, Gloves, Apron

      E - Safety Glasses, Gloves, Dust Respirator

      F - Safety Glasses, Gloves, Apron, Dust Respirator

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Slide17 l.jpg
    HMIS

    • Personal Protective Equipment

      G - Safety Glasses, Gloves, Dust and Vapor Respirator

      H - Splash goggles, Gloves, Apron, Dust and Vapor Respirator

      I - Safety Glasses, Gloves, Dust and Vapor Respirator

      J - Splash goggles, Gloves, Apron, Dust and Vapor Respirator

      K - Airline Hood or Mask, Gloves, Full Suit, and boots

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Material safety data sheets l.jpg
    Material Safety Data Sheets

    • Data sheet containing information about the hazards associated with a chemical.

    • Required by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

    • All manufacturers, distributors, and consumers must have MSDS.

    • All hazardous materials MUST have a corresponding MSDS.


    Msds information l.jpg
    MSDS Information

    • CHEMICAL & COMPANY IDENTIFICATION

    • COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS

    • INFORMATION ON EXPOSURE LIMITS

    • PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    • PHYSICAL & HEALTH HAZARDS

    • PRIMARY ROUTES OF ENTRY INTO BODY

    • EMERGENCY AND FIRST AID

    • FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

    • ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

    • PERSONAL PROTECTION

    • SUGGESTIONS FOR STORAGE

    • DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS

    • OTHER REGULATORY INFORMATION


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    Know Your Area

    • Know the hazards associated with the chemicals you are working with.

    • Know what Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to wear in order to protect yourself from the hazards.

    • Learn the Emergency Procedures. (Do you have a procedure???)

    • Know the location of the MSDSs in your area.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


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    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


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    6.3 STORAGE

    • Keep amounts to a minimum

    • Labeling – name, date, and hazard info (if bottle is too small name or structure and date will be sufficient

    • Date chemicals – received/opened

    • Compatible containers.

    • Closed containers.

    • Flammables –flammable materials cabinet or refrigerator designed for flammable liquid.

    • Compressed gas cylinders shall be properly secured at all times. Cylinder caps shall be in place on cylinders when not in use. Use straps, chains, or stands to support the cylinders.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Exploding refrigerator l.jpg

    We had an explosion in a lab that could have killed people and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    Exploding Refrigerator

    University: University of Virginia

    Year: ~1997 or 1998

    Description of Incident: Normal household refrigerators have several spark points that caused an explosion from built up fumes.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Peroxide explosion l.jpg
    Peroxide Explosion and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • University: University of California (Davis or Berkeley)

    • Year: ~2006

    • Description of Incident: Undergraduate was completing research using a rotovap to remove organic solvents from an azobenzene precipitate. After adjusting the bottom flask, it exploded sending glass into her face and torso. It was determined that the most probable cause was peroxide formation by the tetrahydrofuran (THF) used in the reaction. The THF was tested and found to have elevated peroxide levels.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    6 3 storage cont l.jpg
    6.3 STORAGE CONT. and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • Incompatible chemical segregation

      • Acids

      • Bases

      • Flammables

      • oxidizers

      • Water reactive

    • No food in chemical refrigerator.

    • Proper labeling of refrigerator.

    • Highly toxic materials should be secured.

    • Questions - Chemistry Storeroom and/or Campus EHS Manager.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    5 2 behavior in the laboratory l.jpg
    5.2 BEHAVIOR IN THE LABORATORY and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • Workers shall act in a professional manner at all times.

    • Horseplay and practical jokes are forbidden.

    • No undergraduates are allowed to work in a lab alone. The institution also highly discourages graduate student work alone in laboratories, especially after business hours.

    • Visitors should be supervised.

    • Contact information should be posted on all laboratory doors. If an experiment is being run unattended, this information must cover the proper contact information in case of a catastrophic failure.

    • Awareness of Safety Equipment.

    • Contact EHS if radioactive materials will be used.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Lab fire l.jpg
    Lab Fire and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    University: University of California – Santa Barbara

    Year: Mid 1990s

    Description of Incident: Plumber turned off water to repair faucet leak upon approval from lab employees. Lab personnel did not know that another employee had started a UV-photolysis of a solvent-containing reaction in a closed box. The photolysis required constant cooling water flow to prevent the apparatus from over-heating. After a few minutes with no cooling water flow, the organic solvent burst into flames and began to spread to the wooden box. Fortunately, the plumber – now alone – quickly extinguished the blaze with the lab’s fire extinguisher.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety

    Example of water-flow measuring device with automatic electrical power shutoff.


    5 3 avoidance of routine exposures l.jpg
    5.3 AVOIDANCE OF ROUTINE EXPOSURES and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • Skin contact with chemicals should be avoided.

    • Do not smell or taste chemicals.

    • Do not pipette by mouth; use a vacuum or pipette bulb.

    • Vent any experiment that may discharge toxic or noxious chemicals into a local exhaust device, (i.e., a chemical fume hood).

    • Flammable, corrosive or toxic volatile materials must be trapped when they are evaporated.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    5 4 personal habits in the laboratory l.jpg
    5.4 PERSONAL HABITS IN THE LABORATORY and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • Eating, drinking, gum chewing and cosmetic application

    • Ice usage

    • Frequent hand washing

    • Hair must be confined

    • Shoes that cover the entire foot are required at all times.

    • Appropriate attire

    • Eye Protection

    • Report unsafe conditions

    • Spills

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Liquid nitrogen explosion l.jpg
    Liquid Nitrogen Explosion and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    University: Texas A&M

    Year: ~2006

    Description of Incident: Internal Pressure Relief Device Removed for Liquid Nitrogen Tank causing a pressure build up.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Liquid nitrogen explosion cont l.jpg
    Liquid Nitrogen Explosion Cont and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion..

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    5 5 housekeeping l.jpg
    5.5 HOUSEKEEPING and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • Lab areas are to be kept clean and uncluttered. This will help prevent spillage, breakage, personal injuries and unnecessary contact with chemicals.

    • Contaminated glassware should be cleaned daily.

    • Spills shall be cleaned up immediately from work areas and floors.

    • Doorways and walkways within the lab shall not be blocked or used for storage.

    • Floors shall be maintained dry at all times.

    • Access to exits, hallways, emergency equipment, and utility controls shall never be blocked.

    • Chemical containers shall be properly emptied and cleaned prior to disposal. (Triple-rinsing)

    • Equipment and instrumentation shall be cleaned to remove spillage and contamination before repair or calibration service is requested and service personnel will be informed of any hazardous contamination prior to servicing.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Chemical waste disposal l.jpg
    Chemical Waste Disposal and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/hazwaste

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Incompatible waste explosion l.jpg
    Incompatible Waste Explosion and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • University: University of Kentucky

    • Year: 1997

    • Description of Incident: It is believed that nitric acid and halogenated organic solvent waste were involved, but the exact cause may never be known.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Incident reporting l.jpg
    Incident Reporting and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • http://sdmines.sdsmt.edu/incident

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    References l.jpg
    References and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • OSHA Hazard Communication. - 1910.1200 http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=10099

    • Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories. - 1910.1450 http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=10106

    • http://ehs.ucdavis.edu/ucih/pages/lessons.cfm

    • http://www.chem.purdue.edu/chemsafety/NewsAndStories/RefrigStories.htm

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Additional information l.jpg

    Additional Information and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Flammable definition l.jpg
    Flammable Definition and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • Flammable" means a chemical that falls into one of the following categories:

    • (i) "Aerosol, flammable" means an aerosol that, when tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.45, yields a flame projection exceeding 18 inches at full valve opening, or a flashback (a flame extending back to the valve) at any degree of valve opening;

    • (ii) "Gas, flammable" means: (A) A gas that, at ambient temperature and pressure, forms a flammable mixture with air at a concentration of thirteen (13) percent by volume or less; or

    • (B) A gas that, at ambient temperature and pressure, forms a range of flammable mixtures with air wider than twelve (12) percent by volume, regardless of the lower limit;

    • (iii) "Liquid, flammable" means any liquid having a flashpoint below 100 deg. F (37.8 deg. C), except any mixture having components with flashpoints of 100 deg. F (37.8 deg. C) or higher, the total of which make up 99 percent or more of the total volume of the mixture.

    • (iv) "Solid, flammable" means a solid, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in 1910.109(a), that is liable to cause fire through friction, absorption of moisture, spontaneous chemical change, or retained heat from manufacturing or processing, or which can be ignited readily and when ignited burns so vigorously and persistently as to create a serious hazard. A chemical shall be considered to be a flammable solid if, when tested by the method described in 16 CFR 1500.44, it ignites and burns with a self-sustained flame at a rate greater than one-tenth of an inch per second along its major axis.

    • OSHA Hazard Communication. - 1910.1200

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety


    Carcinogen l.jpg
    Carcinogen and burned down a chemistry building.  It took place in a separate room in a new building protected by sprinklers rather that in the old lab where it would have been in the lab with people and no sprinkler system. I have pictures (digital) that I can send if you would like. They sure helped convince our faculty. We had solvent stills in the room but they were a new safer type and that has also convinced people that these are worth the money as they survived the explosion.

    • 1910.1200(g)(2)(vii)

    • Whether the hazardous chemical is listed in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Annual Report on Carcinogens (latest edition) or has been found to be a potential carcinogen in the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs (latest editions), or by OSHA;

    SDSM&T Environmental Health & Safety