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Homeowners Insurance: The National Market and Trends PowerPoint Presentation
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Homeowners Insurance: The National Market and Trends

Homeowners Insurance: The National Market and Trends

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Homeowners Insurance: The National Market and Trends

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  1. Homeowners Insurance:The National Marketand Trends Residential Property Insurance SymposiumCharlotte, NC May 31, 2013 Steven N. Weisbart, Ph.D., CLU, Senior Vice President & Chief Economist Insurance Information Institute  110 William Street  New York, NY 10038 Tel: 212.346.5540  Cell: 917.494.5945  stevenw@iii.org  www.iii.org

  2. P/C Net Written Premiums,by Segment/Line, 2002 vs. 2012 2002 2012 Commercial Lines $188.1B/50% Commercial Lines $205.6B/46% Homeowners $40.3B/11% Homeowners $66.6B/15% Pvt. Pass Auto $171.8B/39% Pvt. Pass Auto $146.9B/39% Homeowners insurance NWP grew from 11% to 15% of total P/C premiums, growing faster than commercial insurance NWP(which shrank, as a percent of total P/C NWP, from 50% to 46%). Sources: A.M. Best; Insurance Information Institute research. eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  3. Homeowners InsuranceNet Written Premium, 2000–2012 $ Billions Pct. Change Homeowners insurance NWP resumed rising in 2010 after very low growth in 2007-09. Continued growth depends on exposure growth, the composition of the market (renters vs. owners), and other factors. Sources: SNL Financial; Insurance Information Institute. eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  4. Homeowners Insurance Profit, 2011, by State Highest 25 States In 2011, Homeowners insurance produced double-digit percentage profits in just 13 states US average:-3.8% Sources: NAIC 2012 Profitability Report; Insurance Information Institute.

  5. Homeowners Insurance Profit, 2011, by State Lowest 25 States US average:-3.8% Sources: NAIC 2012 Profitability Report; Insurance Information Institute.

  6. Return on Net Worth: Homeowners Insurance, 10-Year Average (2002-2011*) Top 25 States (Percent) Hawaii was the most profitable state for home insurers from 2002-2011 due to the absence of hurricanes during this period *Latest available. Source: NAIC.

  7. Return on Net Worth: Homeowners Insurance, 10-Year Average (2002-2011*) Bottom 25 States (Percent) Hurricanes Katrina and Rita made Louisiana and Mississippi the least profitable states for home insurers from 2002-2011 *Latest available. Sources: NAIC

  8. Return on Net Worth: All P-C Linesvs. Homeowners, 1990-2011* Average RNW: 1990-2011* All P-C Lines: 7.8% Homeowners: 3.2%** Hurricane Irene Texas “Mold” Crisis Katrina, Rita, Wilma Homeowners Insurance Is Considerably More Volatile than the Market Overall Due to Coastal Exposure and Interior Wind/Hail Events *Latest available. **Excluding Hurricane Andrew (1992); Including 1992 produces an average homeowners RNW of 0.5%. Sources: NAIC; Insurance Information Institute. 15

  9. The Marketplace for HO Premiumsis Quite Competitive, 2012 Note: An HHI score under 1,000 is considered a competitive marketplace. Example: In a market, the top 5 insurers’ market share is 16%, 14%, 12%, 10%, and 8%. Total market share of these insurers is 60%. The HHI score for the state is likely to be 900-1000. Sources: SNL Financial; Insurance Information Institute

  10. Demographic and Macroeconomic Forces Affecting Homeowners Insurance Brighter Days Ahead,but Not Without Challenges 17

  11. Projected Population Growth Rates (2010-2020) Vary Widely by State and Region* New England Southeast Mid-Atlantic U.S. population growth overall, 2010-2020, is projected to be 8.7% *based on 2000 census.Source: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/data/state/projectionsagesex.html (Table 7) 18 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  12. Projected Population Growth Rates (2010-2020) Vary Widely by State and Region* (cont’d) Southwest Mountain Far West Great Lakes Great Plains U.S. population growth overall, 2010-2020, is projected to be 8.7% *based on 2000 census.Source: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/data/state/projectionsagesex.html (Table 7) 19 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  13. As the Population Ages, the Numberof People per Household Shrinks (2012) The number of households in these age brackets will soar in the next 20 years Average Household Size Age of Householder As the “baby boom” ages and households get smaller, this will spur growth of smaller homes that are more suited to their requirements. Source: US Census Bureau at http://www.census.gov/hhes/families/data/cps2012.html Table AVG1.

  14. Changes in Household Composition, 2000-2010 Up 14.4% Up 14.7% Down 5% Millions Up 14.6% Up 30.8% The number of traditional households (husband, wife, children at home) fell by 1.25 million in the first decade of the 21st century. Multi-generation households rose by roughly the same number in that decade. Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, “Households and Families: 2010,” issued April 2012.; Insurance Information Institute.

  15. Private Housing Unit Starts, 1990-2014F Millions of Units Forecast range for 2013 is 0.90 to 1.35 million units Housing“Bubble” Starts plunged 72% from 2005-2009 to lowest level since records began in 1959 Homeowners insurers are starting to see meaningful exposure growth for the first time since 2005. Commercial insurers with construction risk exposure, surety also benefit. Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce; Blue Chip Economic Indicators (5/13); Insurance Information Institute.

  16. So Far, the Pickup Is Mostly in Multi-Family Housing Starts Thousands of Units, Single Family Thousands of Units, Multi-Family Multi-family-unit starts rose in 2011, more in 2012, still more so far in 2013. Single family plunge began in 2006 Multi-family plunge did not begin until 2009 2013:Q1 multi-unit starts at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 325,000,are nearly back to the average annual pre-recession rate of 339,000. *average of annualized seasonally adjusted January-April 2013 data; April is preliminary.Source: US Census Bureau at www.census.gov/construction/nrc/pdf/newresconst.pdf.

  17. Number of Rental-Occupied Housing Units, Quarterly, 1990-2013 Millions Latest was 40.1 million units in 2013:Q1 Trough in 2004:Q4 at 33.1 million units Since the Great Recession ended, renters occupied 3.6 million more units (+9.9%)—outstripping population growth (+2.9%). When will this end? Sources: US Census Bureau; Insurance Information Institute. 24 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  18. Rental Vacancy Rates, Quarterly, 1990-2013 Percent vacant Peak vacancy rate 11.1% in 2009:Q3 Latest vacancy rate was 8.6% in 2013:Q1 Before the 2001 recession rental vacancy rates were 8% or less.Can they get there again? Sources: US Census Bureau; Insurance Information Institute. 25 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  19. Rental-Occupied Housing Units as % of Total Occupied Units, Quarterly, 1990-2013 Millions Trend down began in 1994:Q3 from 36.2% in Q2 Latest was 35.0% in 2013:Q1 Trough in 2004:Q2 and Q4 at 30.8% Since the Great Recession ended, renters occupied 3.6 million more units (+9.9%)—outstripping population growth (+2.9%). When will this end? Sources: US Census Bureau; Insurance Information Institute. 26 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  20. Highly Variable P/C Claims Drivers 29

  21. Change* in the Consumer Price Index, 2004–2013 For two months in 2008, led by gasoline, the general price level was rising at a 5.5% pace But when gas prices dropped, the general price level was briefly lower than a year prior Over the last decade, prices generally rose about 2% per year. *Monthly, year-over-year, through April 2013. Not seasonally adjusted. Sources: US Bureau of Labor Statistics; National Bureau of Economic Research (recession dates); Insurance Information Institutes. 30 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  22. Pct Changes in Price* for Residential Construction, 1990–2013 Three times in the past decade the price of residential construction rose ata 7.5% annual rate, or more. Such spikes were probably not in the base rates. *Monthly vs. same month, prior year. Note: Recessions indicated by gray shaded columns. Sources: BLS Producer Price index ; National Bureau of Economic Research (recession dates); Insurance Information Institutes. 31 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  23. Prices for Hospital Services:12-Month Change,* 1998–2013 April 2013Inpatient services +4.0, Outpatient services +4.5% Cyclical peaks in PP Auto tend to occur approximately every 10 years(early 1990s, early 2000s, and possibly the early 2010s) *Percentage change from same month in prior year; through April 2013; seasonally adjusted Sources: US Bureau of Labor Statistics; National Bureau of Economic Research (recession dates); Insurance Information Institute. 32 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  24. Change* in Price Index for Lumber:Sudden Spikes, 2008–2013 But 30% spikes can happen suddenly The price of lumber dropped before and during the recession… Jul 2012 to Apr 2013 *Monthly, year-over-year, through April 2013. Softwood is seasonally adjusted; hardwood is not.January through April 2013 prices are preliminary. Sources: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Producer Price Index series WPS0811 (softwood); WPU812 (hardwood).National Bureau of Economic Research (recession dates); Insurance Information Institutes. 33 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  25. Catastrophes 37

  26. The Dozen Most Costly Hurricanesin U.S. History Insured Losses, 2012 Dollars, $ Billions Sandy will likely become the 3rd costliest hurricane in US insurance history Irene became the 12th most expensive hurricane in US history 10 of the 12 most costly hurricanes in insurance history occurred in the past 9 years (2004—2012) *Estimate as of 12/09/12 based on estimates of catastrophe modeling firms and reported losses as of 1/12/13. Estimates range up to $25B. Sources: PCS; Insurance Information Institute inflation adjustments to 2012 dollars using the CPI.

  27. If They Hit Today, the Dozen Costliest (to Insurers) Hurricanes in U.S. History Insured Losses,2012 Dollars, $ Billions Storms that hit long ago had less property and businesses to damage, so simply adjusting their actual claims for inflation doesn’t capture their destructive power.Karen Clark’s analysis aims to overcome that. When you adjust for the damage prior storms could have done if they occurred today, Hurricane Katrina slips to a tie for 6th among the most devastating storms. *Estimate as of 12/09/12 based on estimates of catastrophe modeling firms and reported losses as of 1/12/13. Estimates range up to $25B. Sources: Karen Clark & Company, Historical Hurricanes that Would Cause $10 Billion or More of Insured LossesToday, August 2012; I.I.I.

  28. US Insured Catastrophe Losses ($ Billions, 2012 Dollars) 2012 CAT losses were down nearly 50% from 2011 until Sandy struck in late October US CAT Losses in 2012 Will Likely Become the 2nd or 3rd Highest in US History on An Inflation-Adjusted Basis (Pvt Insured). 2011 Losses Were the 5th Highest Record Tornado Losses Caused 2011 CAT Losses to Surge *As of 1/2/13. Includes $20B gross loss estimate for Hurricane Sandy. Note: 2001 figure includes $20.3B for 9/11 losses reported through 12/31/01 ($25.9B 2011 dollars). Includes only business and personal property claims, business interruption and auto claims. Non-prop/BI losses = $12.2B ($15.6B in 2011 dollars.) Sources: Property Claims Service/ISO; Insurance Information Institute. 43 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  29. Natural Disasters in the United States, 1980 – 2012Number of Events (Annual Totals 1980 – 2012) There were 184 natural disaster events in the US in 2012 There were over 150 natural disaster events in the US every year since 2006. That hadn’t happened in any year before. Number 41 19 121 3 Meteorological (storm) Climatological (temperature extremes, drought, wildfire) Geophysical (earthquake, tsunami, volcanic activity) Hydrological (flood, mass movement) Source: MR NatCatSERVICE 44

  30. P/C Industry Homeowners Claim Frequency, US, 1997-2011 Claims Paid per 100 Exposures Sources: Insurance Research Council, “Trends in Homeowners Insurance Claims,” p.29; Insurance Information Institute

  31. P/C Industry Homeowners Average Claim Severity, 1997-2011 HO average claim severity is now three times what it was in 1997. Sources: Insurance Research Council, “Trends in Homeowners Insurance Claims,” p. 29, BLS inflation calculator,and Insurance Information Institute

  32. Investments: The Stark Reality 50

  33. U.S. Treasury Security Yields*:A Long Downward Trend, 1990–2013 Yields on 10-Year U.S. Treasury Notes have been essentially below 5% for a full decade. U.S. Treasury security yields recently plunged to record lows Since roughly 80% of P/C bond/cash investments are in 10-year or shorter durations, most P/C insurer portfolios will have low-yielding bonds for years to come. *Monthly, constant maturity, nominal rates, through Mar 2013. Sources: Federal Reserve Bank at http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h15/data.htm. National Bureau of Economic Research (recession dates); Insurance Information Institutes. 51 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  34. Distribution of Bond Maturities,P/C Insurance Industry, 2003-2012 The main shift over these years has been from bonds with longer maturities to bonds with shorter maturities. The industry first trimmed its holdings of over-10-year bonds (from 24.6% in 2003 to 15.4% in 2012) and then trimmed bonds in the 5-10-year category. Falling average maturity of the P/C industry’s bond portfolio is contributing to a drop in investment income along with lower yields. Sources: SNL Financial; Insurance Information Institute. eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  35. Purchasing Power of P/C Industry Investment Gains: 1994–2012F1 ($ Billions, 2012 dollars) Average yearly gain: $60.85B. We haven’t hit that average in the last 5 years. In 2012 both investment income and realized capital gains were lower than in the comparable period in 2011. And because the Federal Reserve Board aims to keep interest rates exceptionally low until the unemployment rate hits 6.5%—likely at least another year off—maturing bonds will be re-invested at even lower rates. 1Investment gains consist primarily of interest, stock dividends and realized capital gains and losses. *2005 figure includes special one-time dividend of $3.2B; 2012F figure is I.I.I. estimate based on annualized actual 2012:Q3 result of $38.089B. Sources: ISO; Insurance Information Institute.

  36. Policyholder Surplus, 2006:Q4–2012:Q3 Drop due to near-record 2011 CAT losses ($ Billions) The industry now has $1 of surplus for every $0.80 of NPW, the strongest claims-paying status in its history Surplus as of 9/30/12 was a new peak Sources: ISO; A.M .Best. 58 12/01/09 - 9pm eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  37. Key Takaways 59

  38. Takeaways • HO Insurance Exposures Will Grow With the U.S. Economy and Population • In 2013-14, more growth in rental market than ownership market • Longer term, demographics might continue to shift the composition of the market toward smaller homes, more rentals • HO Underwriting Profit is Highly Variable, Depends on Frequency, Severity of CATs • Frequency, Severity trends appear to be rising • Inflation in some claims drivers has been/can be severe, even when overall inflation is moderate • Industry Capacity Hits a New Record by Year-End 2013 (Barring Meg-CAT) • Pressure on Underwriting to Generate Profits as the Investment Environment Is/Remains Challenging • Most economists forecast interest rates to remain low for the next few years eSlide – P6466 – The Financial Crisis and the Future of the P/C

  39. Insurance Information Institute www.iii.org Thank you for your timeand your attention!