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Samuel Taylor Coleridge. " No man was ever yet a great poet, without being at the same time a profound philosopher. For poetry is the blossom and the fragrance of all human knowledge , human thoughts, human passions, emotions, language. " - Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

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an opening by coleridge

" No man was ever yet a great poet, without being at the same time a profound philosopher. For poetry is the blossom and the fragrance of all human knowledge, human thoughts, human passions, emotions, language. "

  • - Samuel Taylor Coleridge
An Opening by Coleridge
samuel taylor coleridge s poem the ballad of the dark l adie

Beneath yon birch with silver bark,
And boughs so pendulous and fair,
The brook falls scatter'd down the rock:
And all is mossy there!

  • And there upon the moss she sits,
The Dark Ladie in silent pain;
The heavy tear is in her eye,
And drops and swells again.
  • Three times she sends her little page
Up the castled mountain's breast,
If he might find the Knight that wears
The Griffin for his crest.
  • The sun was sloping down the sky,
And she had linger'd there all day,
Counting moments, dreaming fears--
Oh wherefore can he stay?
Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem: “The Ballad of the Dark Ladie”
slide4

She hears a rustling o'er the brook,
She sees far off a swinging bough!
"'Tis He! 'Tis my betrothed Knight!
Lord Falkland, it is Thou!"

  • She springs, she clasps him round the neck,
She sobs a thousand hopes and fears,
Her kisses glowing on his cheeks
She quenches with her tears.
slide5

"My friends with rude ungentle words
They scoff and bid me fly to thee!
O give me shelter in thy breast!
O shield and shelter me!

  • "My Henry, I have given thee much,
I gave what I can ne'er recall,
I gave my heart, I gave my peace,
O Heaven! I gave thee all."
  • The Knight made answer to the Maid,
While to his heart he held her hand,
"Nine castles hath my noble sire,
None statelier in the land.
  • "The fairest one shall be my love's,
The fairest castle of the nine!
Wait only till the stars peep out,
The fairest shall be thine:
slide6

"Wait only till the hand of eve
Hath wholly closed yon western bars,
And through the dark we two will steal
Beneath the twinkling stars!"--

  • "The dark? the dark? No! not the dark?
The twinkling stars? How, Henry? How?
O God! 'twas in the eye of noon
He pledged his sacred vow!
slide7

"And in the eye of noon my love
Shall lead me from my mother's door,
Sweet boys and girls all clothed in white
Strewing flowers before:

  • "But first the nodding minstrels go
With music meet for lordly bowers,
The children next in snow-white vests,
Strewing buds and flowers!
  • "And then my love and I shall pace,
My jet black hair in pearly braids,
Between our comely bachelors
And blushing bridal maids."
  • * * * * *
1798.


  • -THE END-

quotation

These lines are taken from S. Coleridge’s “The Ballade of Dark Ladie” which was written in the Eighteenth Century, Romantic era.

  • There are many Romantic glimpses in the poem. First, there is a vast sense of emotion, for example, “The Dark Ladie in silent pain;/ The heavy tear is in her eye,/ And drops and swells again” (6-8). Second, there are many scenes from nature, for example, “"But first the nodding minstrels go/ With music meet for lordly bowers,/ The children next in snow-white vests,/ Strewing buds and flowers!” (53-56). Third, there is a sense of humanism, for example, “"My friends with rude ungentle words/ They scoff and bid me fly to thee!/ O give me shelter in thy breast” (25-27). In other words, the dark maid can’t get married to the Knight because they are from two different social classes. Fourth, there is symbolism in the word “dark” because it shows human suffering and agony.
Quotation:
the end

This poem is interesting because of many considerations. It touches upon a sensitive matter for human youth. It addresses social subjects within a love-story framework.

The End