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Problem Solving and Programming – Problem Solving PowerPoint Presentation
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Problem Solving and Programming – Problem Solving

Problem Solving and Programming – Problem Solving

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Problem Solving and Programming – Problem Solving

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  1. Dr Scott Turner Problem Solving and Programming – Problem Solving

  2. Why do you needed to develop problem solving skills? • One definition of programming is it is applied problem solving • You have a problem (E.g Need a program to calculate the area of the circle). • What needs to be done? • What inputs and outputs are needed? • How does what is entered produce the right output?

  3. “…many students have almost no mathematical background and some even arrive with a built-in phobia against anything involving formulae or syntax.” Carter (2004)

  4. “Programming is a complex activity…. Problem Solving is not trivial and requires component skills including relativity; decision making; identification of the central issues; recognition of relationships, familiar situations and patterns; development of an algorithm and the translation of the algorithm into executable code. ” Beaumont and Fox (2003)

  5. Beaumont C and Fox C (2003) “LEARNING PROGRAMMING: ENHANCING QUALITY THROUGH PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING.” [online] 4th Annual conference of the LTSN Centre for Information and Computer Science Galway 26-28th August 2003 http://www.ics.ltsn.ac.uk/pub/conf2003/index.htm accessed on 16th October 2003 • Carter C (2004) “Say it another way Sam: Different Learning Paths” [online] LTSN-ICS One Day Workshop on the Teaching of Programming university of Huddersfield 15th March 2004 http://www.ics.ltsn.ac.uk/pub/programming04/index.html accessed on: 16th July 2004.

  6. Mistakes • An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field. Niels Bohr

  7. Mistakes Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. Albert Einstein

  8. Simplicity • Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex... It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction. Albert Einstein

  9. Simplicity • Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler. Albert Einstein • All quotes taken from:http://www.brainyquote.com/ Accessed on 18/9/2006

  10. How do this course split • Weeks 1-8 • Problem Solving • Weeks 9-24 • Java Programming

  11. Stepwise refinement • Take the problem and break it down in to smaller and smaller chunks that are now manageable.

  12. Basics • Problem statement • Analysis • Design • Implementation • Testing

  13. Analysis – Sample thoughts • What does it have to do? • What does it need? • What rules/algorithms are needed? • When testing what does it take to prove it works? • Can I break this down further?

  14. Things to remember • There is often more than one solution to a problem • You can often solve a problem in many different ways, that each have advantages and disadvantages. • Two heads are better than one • Part of some problem solving techniques can be as simple as discussing issues. • For example: Why did you do that?

  15. Problem 1.1 • Write a routine to calculate the area of the circle. • First pass • Input • Calculation • Display

  16. Second pass • Input • Input radius of the circle • Calculation • Area=Pi x radius x radius • Display • Display area on the screen

  17. Third pass • Put a message of the screen telling the user to enter the radius of the circle. • Read in from the keyboard what the radius of the circle is • Calculation Area=Pi x radius x radius • Display the following message on the screen “The area of the circle is “ and display the result of the calculation on the screen

  18. Problem 1.2: • In groups of 2-3 write a routine for calculating the area of a rectangular room. • First pass • Input • Calculation • Display

  19. What assumptions did you make? • Did you assume that the measurements of the room were already taken? • What units of measurement did you use? • What does area of the room mean? • Area of the floor? • Area of the floor and area of all the walls?

  20. Problem 1.3 • An Ant is in the corner of the a sqaure room. (taken orginally from: Vickers P (2009) How to Think Like a Programmer ISBN 978-84480-903-5 Cengage) • Goal: Is to get to a bowl of sugar in the opposite diagonal corner on the floor. What is the shortest route? • Restrictions: It can’t fly or be blown across the room

  21. Hints • The key to this problem is to re-arrange the problem. • Try flattening the walls.

  22. University of Minnesota – Five steps in problem solving • Understand and isolate the problem • Brainstorm for ideas to solve the problem • Design a solution that might work • Test your solution to see if it will work • Assess whether the solution is good enough to do it • See http://cda.mrs.umn.edu/~fauxr/computing/problemsolve.html

  23. Understand and isolate the problem • What does it take to succeed with a particular problem? • What is the vital information? • Identify the parts of the problems – analysis. • What are the inputs and outputs?

  24. Understand and isolate the problem • Identify the parts of the problems – analysis. • What are the inputs and outputs? • What are the limitations? • What are the rules?

  25. Brainstorm for ideas to solve the problem • Note down all the solutions • Have solutions been used in similar way before? • Keep solutions that have common features . • Two heads are better than one. • When all the solutions have been found weed-out less reasonable ones. • Can be solo or group activity.

  26. Design a solution that might work • The design of a solution can be created using diagrams, algorithms and other models. The main purposes of creating a design that can be viewed by others is to communicate the solution. Providing a diagram or algorithm of what you THINK is going on and is needed will provide others a chance to see what your thinking is.

  27. Test your solution to see if it will work • Take the time to trace through your design with some test information. • Try more than one scenario. • Try to find information that tests the borders. • Choose some information that isn't supposed to work and be certain that the design handles it. • Give your algorithm or diagram to another person.

  28. Assess whether the solution is good enough to do it • Is this solution really worth doing? • Would another solution be better for this situation?

  29. Problem 1.4 • Write a routine that lets the user convert pounds Stirling into the Northampton dollar and display the results • What information do you need? • What does the routine need to do?