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Quilting. Denyse Schmidt. What is Quilting?. A linear pattern made by small running stitches: these have a decorative purpose but they hold together three layers – the top, the backing and the middle layer of batting. Pieced top. Batting. Muslin. What are the uses?.

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Quilting

Quilting

Denyse Schmidt


What is quilting
What is Quilting?

A linear pattern made by small running stitches: these have a decorative purpose but they hold together three layers – the top, the backing and the middle layer of batting.

Pieced top

Batting

Muslin


What are the uses
What are the uses?

  • Utilitarian-usually quilts designed and quickly constructed for warmth, pieced together from whatever was available from the scrap bag, also other can be used for other things. Ex: Curtains, oven glove blankets, tablecloth and many other uses.

  • Decorative- Made for aesthetic reasons mostly adornments and heirlooms. Ex: Wall hangings and wedding quilts.


Utilitarian
Utilitarian

Some examples of modern utilitarian quilting: oven mitt, bedspread, curtains, tablecloth


Quilting methods
Quilting Methods

Piecing- or patchwork, is where different scraps of material are sewn together in a way which shows no stitches to create the quilting top

Appliqué-in which different materials are directly added to the top layer of the quilt, usually by sewing



One of the earliest known uses of quilting is armor. This campaign vest from Japan dates from the late 16 century. Back has an appliqué pawlonia flower.


Fireman's coat dating from the early 20 campaign vest from Japan dates from the late 16 century. Back has an appliqué pawlonia flower.th century. The layers of fabric would be drenched with water before he began his work.


Quilting around the world
Quilting around the world campaign vest from Japan dates from the late 16 century. Back has an appliqué pawlonia flower.

ASIAN QUILTS

Sashiko was a technique developed in Japan and comes from the Japanese words sashi, to stitch, and koginu, hemp fabric. It began as a purely utilitarian way to patch overused pieces of cloth but developed into the decorative way it is used now to create intricate geometric or cultural designs.

It was used first on indigo dyed hemp but now is used on mostly on similarly dyed cotton. Usually only one high contrast color thread is used for the stitches.


Sashiko, a style of Japanese quilting, which means “little stabs,” is a unique combination of quilting and embroidery. Some patterns have symbolic significance: the hexagonal grid repeat represents the shell of the tortoise implying long life and prosperity.


Fine needlework of quilts done in Bangladesh are known as Kanthas. These quilts are created using simple running stitches and are rich with the culture of life.


Whole cloth quilts
Whole Cloth Quilts Kanthas. These quilts are created using simple running stitches and are rich with the culture of life.


Quilts from Wales typically have a central motif set in a series of borders separated by a a row of quilting. This quilt using cotton sateen is from 1933.


Quilts form Wales region can be easily distinguished. The designs are generally more geometric and draw on a particular repertoire of motifs.


AMISH QUILTS designs are generally more geometric and draw on a particular repertoire of motifs.

The Amish came to America from Europe in search of religious freedom. There are many still living in the United States today, where they continue to make traditional quilts.

Amish quilts contain heavily saturated geometric shapes and are usually made from wool or cotton cloth and filled with a complementary material. The quilt patterns are usually sewn to follow the pieced pattern.


The unique color of Amish Quilts is from hand dyeing the fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.


Contemporary whole cloth quilts
Contemporary Whole Cloth Quilts fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.


Dorothy Caldwell 1995 fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.“Field Notes” Dorothy Caldwell is a contemporary textile artist who integrates historical work in modern context.


Barbara todd 1995 overlay deep blues
Barbara Todd 1995 fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.“Overlay Deep Blues”


Elizabeth Gurrier1983 fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.“The Ladies in the Garden” (trapunto quilt)Her unusual sculptural quilts typically feature stylized human faces and large scale floral motifs.


Pat Autenreith 1995 fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.“Icarus”This quilt gives a modern twist to the depiction of the ancient Greek myth of Icarus.


APPLIQUÉ QUILTS OF PANAMA fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.

Molas are a traditional art of the Kuna women of Panama and are created using a form of reverse appliqué. The designs usually consist of animal forms and might contain a narrative.

Molas contain about 2-3 main pieces of bright cloth that are placed on top of each other and then have sections cut out to reveal the cloth below. Other pieces of cloth can be added afterwards to create a more interesting design.


APPLIQUE QUILTS OF THE PACIFIC fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.

(THE ONES THAT CAUGHT OUR EYE)

TIVAEVAE

Tivaevae is a traditional quilting form from the Pacific Islands and Hawaii that uses patchwork and appliqué combined with brightly colored fabrics to create large pieces of cloth used for bedspreads or couch coverings.

The art was introduced by missionary’s wives when they came to the islands but has since then taken on a distinctive look of its own, primarily noted by the bright colors and island inspired designs.


More about tivaevae
More about tivaevae fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.

TIVAEVAE MANU are the quilts that have the very decorative appliqué. Usually the patterns are flowers or things that can be found around the islands where these quilts are traditionally made. The colors are usually bright and can be similar to a graphic design.

TIVAEVAE TATAURA are quilts made with appliqué and embroidery . These also contain many of the same patterns of the TIVAEVAE MANU. They are also made with 2-3 colors of cloth but the embroidery thread is usually a colorful variegated cotton thread. Many different types of stitches are used.


American quilts
AMERICAN QUILTS fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity.

American quilts span far and wide in design and use. Some quilts, like the one to the left, have a patriotic quality by the use of color and imagery. Quilting is also used for social aspects of living when “quilting bees” are thrown in small towns. Usually to collect for charities or even produce quilts for certain groups. Either way quilting has not lost its popularity in America and every year sees its fair share in renewed traditional and contemporary quilts.

Drunkard Path W.C.T.U. Quilt 1896


Log Cabin Quilts fabrics are dyed using weeds, berries and bark. The quilting was done on frames and was a communal activity. and its’ Variations One of the most popular quilt blocks, the Log Cabin block is easy to piece and is a good choice for the beginning quilter. It is an excellent choice for a scrap quilt and offers many different settings and variations thus making it popular with more seasoned quilters.


Log Cabin designs were made in the United States as early as the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.


Log cabin light and dark doll quilt 23 x 26 1890
Log Cabin Light and Dark the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Doll Quilt 23” x 26” 1890


Log cabin light and dark 1885
Log Cabin: Light and Dark 1885 the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.


Log cabin light and dark 1925 amish
Log Cabin: Light and Dark 1925 Amish the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.


Log cabin light and dark straight furrows 1925
Log Cabin: Light and Dark/Straight Furrows 1925 the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.


Gee s bend quilts

Gee’s Bend Quilts the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.


Log cabin housetop henrietta pettway 1930
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Henrietta Pettway 1930


Log cabin housetop amelia bennett bars and strips 1929
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Amelia Bennett “Bars and Strips” 1929


Log cabin housetop rachel carey georgia 1930
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied. Rachel Carey “Georgia” 1930


Log cabin housetop martha jane pettway 1945
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Martha Jane Pettway 1945


Log cabin housetop sue willie seltzer 1955
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Sue Willie Seltzer 1955


Log cabin housetop addie pearl nicholson 1974
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Addie Pearl Nicholson 1974


Log cabin flora moore 1975
Log Cabin the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Flora Moore 1975


Log cabin sadie bell nelson monkey wrench 1965
Log Cabin the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Sadie Bell Nelson “Monkey Wrench” 1965


Log cabin housetop linda diane bennett 1970
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Linda Diane Bennett 1970


Log cabin housetop minnie sue coleman pig in the pen 1970
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Minnie Sue Coleman “Pig in the Pen” 1970


Log cabin housetop irene williams 1975
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Irene Williams 1975


Log cabin housetop mary lee bendolp 1998
Log Cabin: Housetop the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Mary Lee Bendolp 1998


Log cabin quilts contemporary variations

Log Cabin Quilts the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied. Contemporary Variations


Log cabin light and dark straight furrows dena canty 1991
Log Cabin: Light and Dark Straight Furrows the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Dena Canty 1991


Log cabin kaffe fassett jewel squares 1997
Log Cabin: the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Kaffe Fassett Jewel Squares 1997


Log cabin kaffe fassett jewel squares 19971
Log Cabin: the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Kaffe Fassett Jewel Squares 1997


Log cabin nancy crow color blocks 22 1992
Log Cabin: Nancy Crow “Color Blocks #22” 1992 the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.


Log cabin liz axford emotions and abstractions 2 1994
Log Cabin: the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Liz Axford Emotions and Abstractions #2 1994


Log cabin liz axford within and without 6 2000
Log Cabin: the 1860s, and their construction introduced the new foundation technique. In this technique, a square of lightweight cotton cloth is cut to the size of the block, and fabric is pieced to that foundation, working from the center out. In many of the old quilts the center square was red. This was to symbolize the hearth of the home. Since the foundation acts as an extra inner layer, these quilts do not usually incorporate a layer of batting and are not quilted, although sometimes they are tied.Liz Axford Within and Without #6 2000



Log cabin amy orr twist tied 2000
Log Cabin: Amy Orr “Twist Tied” 2000 (Anticipating the Journey) 2000


Log cabin korea mi sik kim lost years 2002
Log Cabin: Korea (Anticipating the Journey) 2000Mi Sik Kim “Lost Years” 2002


Log cabin japan tomoko fujioka butterfly 1990
Log Cabin: Japan (Anticipating the Journey) 2000 Tomoko Fujioka “Butterfly” 1990


Log cabin japan toyoko fujisaki moon light 1990
Log Cabin: Japan (Anticipating the Journey) 2000Toyoko Fujisaki “Moon Light” 1990


Student work introduction to fibers 2009

Student Work (Anticipating the Journey) 2000Introduction to Fibers 2009


Image inventory
Image Inventory (Anticipating the Journey) 2000

  • Slide 1: http://www.virginiaspiegel.com/RevA07Murkin.html

  • Slide 2: http://home.howstuffworks.com/assembling-the-quilt-top.htmhttp://www.nearseanaturals.com/item.php?id=2102http://www.empiretape.com/index.php?cPath=57

  • Slide 4: http://cupcakestakethecake.blogspot.com/2009/07/win-cupcake-apron-and-cupcake-oven.html

    http://www.sz-wholesale.com/uploadFiles/hand%20made%20patchwork%20quilts_585.jpg

    http://www.dealgain.com/default.asp

    http://cptnrin.smugmug.com/photos/400328824_oifB2-O.jpg

  • Slide 5: http://www.limegreenlizzie.co.uk/USERIMAGES/WEB%20SMALL%20HEARTS%20QUILT%20%202.JPG

    http://www.quiltdesignwizard.com/qdw/gallery/images/janeprice/wedding.jpg

    http://www.purpledragonquilts.com/images/Mom_s_Memory_Quilt-1.jpg

  • Slide 6: http://www.alwaysquilting.com.au/crafternews/images/lana_applique.JPG

  • Slide 7-12: Georgia Quilts: Piecing together a history.Weinraub, Anita Zaleski. P.139 University of Georgia Press. 2006

    http://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/2009/oct/31/ym_am_craft_bizs_110109_70858/?news&local-news

    http://www.rachelsofgreenfield.com/images/products/ROGP0296.jpg

    http://img.hgtv.com/HGTV/2002/09/27/qlt804_1a_Welshquilt_al.jpg

    http://www.sos-arsenic.net/images/quilt1.jpg

    Quilting, Patchwork, and Applique. Crabtree, Caroline. P. 130- 145 Thames and Hudson. 2007.

    http://www.banjaratextiles.com/images/banjara33-1.jpg

    http://www.stitchinpost.com/images/QA_Classes/_moreQApatterns/502-SensationalSashiko.jpg

    http://www.boatus.com/cruising/ithaka/images/Molas-2005--%2827%29.jpg

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/27/VenancioMolaCloseup.jpg

  • Slide 12- 17: http://www.bellapacific.com/images/catalogue/store5099/store5099-thum359.jpg

    http://nancysullivan.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8346fb29c53ef010534b5226b970b-800wi

    The Art of Tivaevae: traditional cook islands quilting. Rongokea, Lynnsay. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu. 2001

    http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/db_images/objimage.jpg?width=300&height=350&irn=79820

  • Slide 18: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSBmS178lA


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