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Chapter 17-Part 2. Protein in Foods. WHERE DO THEY COME FROM?. Eggs Meat Fish Poultry. Variety of sources. Other Sources of Proteins. Fruits Vegetables Grains Nuts (They just do not have as many amino acids). Eggs. Contain almost every vitamin and mineral you need.

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chapter 17 part 2
Chapter 17-Part 2

Protein in Foods

slide2

WHERE DO THEY COME FROM?

Eggs

Meat

Fish

Poultry

Variety of sources

other sources of proteins
Other Sources of Proteins
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Grains
  • Nuts

(They just do not have as many amino acids)

slide4
Eggs

Contain almost every vitamin and mineral you need

Yolks are rich in:

-iron

-phosphorus

-vitamin A

-several B vitamins

Lacking:

-vitamin C

-calcium only present in the shells

proteins in eggs
Proteins in Eggs
  • Protein is the foundation of an egg.
  • Shell contains protein molecules interwoven with calcium carbonate crystals.
structure of an egg
Structure of an egg

Air Pocket

Egg

Membrane Thin albumen

Yolk Thick albumen

Chalaza

Shell membrane

slide7

Cracking open an egg you

first encounter

albumen (egg white) – makes up 54% of the

inner contents of an egg, known for

ovalbumin, a major protein in egg white.

slide8

Thickest part of the albumen is the

Chalaza – a twisted ropelike structure that keeps the egg yolk centered.

Last part of the egg to

coagulate and may

remain slightly watery.

slide9

Yolk – main components include

      • Globular protein livetin
      • High and low-density lipoproteins
      • Contains all of the fat, along with most of the

other nutrients

effects of storage
Effects of Storage

Where should eggs NOT be stored in a refrigerator?

Why?

It exposes eggs to light and temperature every time you open the door.

It hastens chemical changes that ultimately deteriorates the egg.

slide11

How can you tell if an egg is fresh?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aytZn9cFgE

slide12
Meat
  • Refers to any edible portion of mammals,
  • Including muscle and fatty tissue
slide13

Muscle tissue - Lean part of meat

      • About 15-20% protein
      • Other components include
        • Water, fat and minerals
      • Muscle is composed of
        • Fibrous proteins called actin and myosin
        • They form bundles of fibers , held together by

connective tissues made of collagen and elastin

Two proteins with long, strong molecules.

slide14
Fish
  • Shorter, segmented muscle fibers are layered between thin sheets of connective tissue
nuts and legumes
Nuts and Legumes

From plants nuts and legumes (dry deans, peas, lentils, soybeans

Nuts – peanuts, walnuts

cashews

Carry a rich source of nutrients

slide16

Cholesterol-free

  • Range in fat from
    • Zero to very high
  • Nuts too high in fat to be considered a main source of protein
  • Soybeans are composed of 40% protein, their protein is equal to that of foods from animals.
slide18

Emulsifiers – egg yolk, the most common emulsifier

  • Protein can stabilize oil-and-water mixture
  • Certain proteins contain amino acids that are polar.
  • One end of these amino acids is attracted to water while the other end avoids water and bonds to oil.
foams
Foams
  • Air bubbles incorporated and trapped in a protein film by whipping.
  • Add volume and lightness
  • Begins when a protein-containing liquid is whipped.
  • Whipping introduces air and denatures the protein molecules
slide20

Air bubbles incorporated and

trapped in a protein film by whipping.

  • Add volume and lightness
  • Begins when a protein-containing liquid is whipped.
  • Whipping introduces air and denatures the protein molecules