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Presented by Doug Henton Collaborative Economics. What are the new realities? The realities facing everyone Additional realities facing universities/colleges What are the new requirements? New thinking about leadership New thinking about university/college mission

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slide1

Presented by

Doug Henton

Collaborative Economics

setting the stage
What are the new realities?

The realities facing everyone

Additional realities facing universities/colleges

What are the new requirements?

New thinking about leadership

New thinking about university/college mission

What are the new opportunities?

New common ground between institutions and their regions

New benefits for all partners in regional collaboration

SETTING THE STAGE
new realities regions universities colleges and stewardship
NEW REALITIES: Regions, Universities/Colleges, and Stewardship
  • The Idea-Driven Economy
  • The Proximity Edge
  • The Talent Imperative
  • The Big Regional Sort
  • A New Definition of Success
  • A New Focus on Place-Based Assets
  • The Search for Regional Stewards
the idea driven economy
THE IDEA-DRIVEN ECONOMY
  • Raw material is ideas (the ingredients)
  • Ideas are organized into innovations (recipes)
  • Companies that don’t innovate, die
  • Successful regions institutionalize innovation
  • Innovation requires expertise, interaction, and diversity
the proximity edge
THE PROXIMITY EDGE
  • Open systems of innovation require many ingredients close by
  • Face-to-face interaction and proximity critical
  • Businesses competing on the basis of innovation locate based on regional knowledge, relationships, and mindset
the talent imperative
THE TALENT IMPERATIVE
  • Skilled people are the most important resource for innovation
  • Both highly educated populations and specialized concentrations of talent
  • Not just young people, but older workers and immigrants who will be responsible for much of the future labor force growth
the big regional sort
THE BIG REGIONAL SORT
  • Regions with most college graduates continue to attract more—a growing divide
  • Fast growth does not always equate with gains in college graduates (e.g., Las Vegas)
  • In some regions, universities and community colleges may be one of the few assets to attract knowledge workers and retool older workers and new immigrants
a new definition of success
A NEW DEFINITION OF SUCCESS
  • Growth in real income per capita, not population or job growth per se
  • Success through wealth comes from innovation, which results in increased productivity and growing prosperity
  • Keys are: education level, science and technology activity, export-oriented industries, entrepreneurial initiative, innovation across industries and sectors, talent strategy, reduction of poverty and inequality
a new focus on place based assets
A NEW FOCUS ON PLACE-BASED ASSETS
  • Natural environment
  • Distinctive amenities
  • Lifestyle choices (young, baby boomers, immigrants)
  • Innovative place
  • Tolerance, inclusiveness
  • Speed
new realities mean new responses are required
NEW REALITIES MEAN NEW RESPONSES ARE REQUIRED

America’s Citistates

  • Most complex challenges today are regional in scale.
  • Traditional business, government and civic responses are not adequate
  • Boundary-crossing is now required
  • Few know how to engage in this kind of regional civic leadership
challenge of regional complexity
CHALLENGE OF REGIONAL COMPLEXITY
  • Four regional, often distinct, conversations today:
    • INNOVATIVE ECONOMY how to succeed in the innovation economy and ensure everyone participates
    • LIVABLE COMMUNITY how to create communities where people want to live
    • SOCIAL INCLUSIONhow to ensure inclusive and equitable communities
    • COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE How to form public-private alliances to tackle complex challenges
the search for regional stewards
THE SEARCH FOR REGIONAL STEWARDS
  • Complex challenges overwhelm traditional approaches and systems
  • Leaders are often fragmented, unaware of one another, or focused too narrowly
  • Stewards are emerging at the center of four conversations, forging new approaches
  • Universities and community colleges are logical stewards of place
a new leadership model
A NEW LEADERSHIP MODEL
  • Regional Stewardship: commitment to place
  • Traditional Leadership: commitment to an issue/cause
  • Stewards understand the interdependence between the economy, society, and environment
  • Regional stewardship is both an individual and a regional capacity
new expecations
NEW EXPECATIONS
  • New expectations for university/college contributions to the region—roles in all four conversations
  • New expectations that universities/colleges step forward as “stewards of place” as they are uniquely situated—embedded—with a sense of place
universities emerging as regional stewards
FROM

Teaching

Research

Service

TO

Learning

Innovation

Shared Leadership

UNIVERSITIES EMERGING AS REGIONAL STEWARDS
teaching to learning
FROM

Classroom

Teaching inputs

One-way content delivery

Preparation of next generation

TO

Classroom w/o walls

Educational outcomes

Two-way exchange

Continuous preparation of all generations

TEACHING TO LEARNING
research to innovation
FROM

Idea generation

Individual inventions

Single discipline focus

Higher education institution-centered work

TO

Idea application

Collaborative innovations

Interdisciplinary focus

Regional collaborations

RESEARCH TO INNOVATION
service to shared leadership
FROM

Episodic, short-term involvement

Tactical, individual contributions

Issue/cause focus

Accountability for services rendered

TO

Sustained, long-term involvement

Strategic, institutional commitment

Focus on community/ region well-being

Shared responsibility for results

SERVICE TO SHARED LEADERSHIP
an era of opportunity
AN ERA OF OPPORTUNITY?
  • Talent, innovation, and shared leadership have never been so important
  • Universities and community colleges are a critical asset for succeeding in this new world
  • Neither universities/colleges nor other regional leaders can do it alone, without crossing boundaries
  • Regional stewardship offers a path forward
step 1 establish regional context
STEP 1: Establish Regional Context
  • Identify and diagnose the region, paying particular attention to the four conversations (innovative economy, livable community, inclusive society, collaborative governance)
  • Identify and order stewardship priorities for the region
  • Identify primary regional resources and capacity, focusing on top stewardship priorities.
step 2 assess university system state resources
STEP 2: Assess University-System-State Resources
  • Identify university/college resources and capacities that are currently applied (or could be applied) to top regional stewardship priorities.
  • Assess policy/practice environments (campus-system-state) that help or hinder the institution’s regional application of resources and capacity to stewardship priorities.
step 3 develop goals and success measures
STEP 3: Develop Goals and Success Measures
  • Identify target areas for stewardship initiatives and for institutionalization of top stewardship priorities.
  • Establish success measures for top regional stewardship priorities.
key expectations
KEY EXPECTATIONS
  • Effort must be simultaneously region and institution centered, rather than one or the other
  • Effort is a strategic conversation, not a program or budget discussion
  • Effort must focus on immediate actions and policy changes that have both short-term results and long-term impacts
the mpm seminar simulation of full process
THE MPM SEMINAR:SIMULATION OF FULL PROCESS
  • 4 Step Process
  • 4 Sessions with debriefing time over 1-2 days
  • Regional-Institution teams of 5-15
  • “Test Drive”
  • 4 Step Process
  • 4 Meetings with “homework” and committee work over one year
  • Regional-Institution teams of 25-75
  • “Prototype Process”
examples of regional challenges
EXAMPLES OF REGIONAL CHALLENGES
  • INNOVATIVE ECONOMY—primarily economically-driven concerns such as industry restructuring, job loss, entrepreneurship, commercialization of new technologies, climate for innovation
  • LIVABLE COMMUNITY—primarily quality-of-life driven concerns such as environmental quality, urban and neighborhood revitalization, land use, transportation congestion, housing, amenities
  • SOCIAL INCLUSION - primarily socially-driven concerns such as poverty, educational preparation, employment opportunity, community health, civic participation
  • COLLABORATIVE GOVERNANCE - primarily problem-solving concerns such as the need for regional alliances of local jurisdictions, local/state/federal collaboration, and public-private partnerships to address complex regional challenges
step 1 establish regional context31
STEP 1: ESTABLISH REGIONAL CONTEXT
  • EXAMPLES OF ASSETS
  • REGIONAL ASSETS—major regional collaborative initiatives, key public and/or private investments, major institutions that do or could address the challenge
  • INSTITUTION ASSETS—leadership, expertise, major internal and externally focused initiatives, key investments/incentives/policies
oklahoma mpm preparatory steps
Oklahoma MPM: Preparatory Steps
  • Presidents’ Orientation (June)
  • Determine Regions, Choose Facilitators, and Forge Agreements to Work Together Among Higher Education Institutions in the Same Region (June-July)
  • Facilitator Briefing Book and Training Session (August-September)
  • Assemble Regional Team to Attend MPM Seminar (Team to include approximately 10 institutional, business, and community partners) (August-September)
  • MPM Seminar (October-November)