Why PROPEL? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

ronat
slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Why PROPEL? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Why PROPEL?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14
Download Presentation
Why PROPEL?
128 Views
Download Presentation

Why PROPEL?

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Why PROPEL? • It is an economic issue in that the earning power of high school dropouts is significantly below that of those who obtain higher education levels, and it is getting worse. • It is an educational problem in that somehow we have not been able to meet the needs of students. • It is a social problem in that the cost to society is increased.

  2. Forsyth vs. State Graduation

  3. By The Numbers • 75 percent of state prison inmates and 59 percent of federal inmates are high-school dropouts. • High-school dropouts are 3.5 times more likely than graduates to be incarcerated. • Dropouts contribute disproportionately to the unemployment rate. In 2001, 55 percent of young adult dropouts were employed, compared to 74 percent of high-school graduates and 87 percent of college graduates. • Dropouts contribute to state and federal tax coffers at about one-half the rate of high-school graduates. Over a working lifetime, a dropout will contribute about $60,000 less. • The 23 million high-school dropouts aged 18-67 will contribute roughly $50 billion less annually in state and federal taxes. • Studies suggest the United States would save $41.8 billion in health care costs if the 600,000 young people who dropped out in 2004 were to complete one additional year of education. • If 33 percent of dropouts graduated from high school, the federal government would save $10.8 billion each year in food stamps, housing assistance, and temporary assistance for needy families. • Testifying before Congress, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings said dropouts cost the United States "more than $260 billion... in lost wages, lost taxes and lost productivity over their lifetimes."

  4. Clearing the Myths Myth1 – Social Reasons Students drop out mostly for social, family, or personal reasons that have little to do with school.

  5. Myth 2 - Predictability Dropping out is a sudden and often surprising event that can’t be predicted.

  6. Myth 3 – The School’s Impact • Dropping out is a personal decision that has nothing to do with how schools operate.

  7. Myth 4: Engagement Students drop out because they are bored, not because they struggle academically.

  8. Myth 5: Academic Prep If we just made sure all students were academically prepared to handle high school coursework, the dropout problem would go away.

  9. Myth 6: Low Ambitions Students drop out because they have low ambitions.

  10. What We Can Do Parents…Schools…Community We All Have a Hand!

  11. Identify Students Early Examine Policies & Procedures Strong Community Partnerships Reduce Social Isolation Manage Student Transitions Parent & Family Relationships Options & Interventions