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INTRODUCTION Hook Thesis Map. Five-Paragraph Essay. BODY PARAGRAPH 1 Topic Sentence Evidence Commentary Evidence Commentary Evidence Commentary Transition. Five-Paragraph Essay. CONCLUSION Map Thesis Hook. Thesis Statements. W ho, W here, V ivid V erb, t hat, T heme.

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five paragraph essay

INTRODUCTION

Hook

Thesis

Map

Five-Paragraph Essay

BODY PARAGRAPH 1

Topic Sentence

Evidence

Commentary

Evidence

Commentary

Evidence

Commentary

Transition

five paragraph essay1
Five-Paragraph Essay

CONCLUSION

Map

Thesis

Hook

thesis statements
Thesis Statements

Who, Where, Vivid Verb, that, Theme.

W,W,VV,t,T

slide4
Maps

Pronoun, Vivid Verb, List, Tie-in

P, VV, L1+L2+L3, T

Vivid verb for “uses”

hooks
Hooks

The HOOK gets the reader’s ATTENTION.

Hooks can come in the form of: personal experiences, observations, jokes, facts or statistics, quotations, or questions.

topic sentences
Topic Sentences

Last Name, Vivid Verb, Map Item, Why

LN, VV, MI, W

evidence
Evidence

Evidence can come in two forms:

Quotations or Paraphrases

commentary
Commentary

Commentary explains (or comments on) how the evidence proves the topic sentence and/or the thesis.

Use transition words often in your commentary sentences.

thesis statements1
Thesis statements
  • Judge for yourself: Thumbs up=good thesis; thumbs down=bad thesis.
  • “The book, The Great Hornspoon, is both similar to and different that the movie.”

President Kennedy meant many things when he said, ‘Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.’”

  • “Many People think uniforms should be mandatory.”
map sentence
Map Sentence
  • Map Sentence:
  • The sentence before the thesis, explains what reasons support your thesis.
  • Intro Paragraph should contain:
  • Hook
  • Map
  • Thesis
map statement practice
Map statement practice
  • An Island getaway is the perfect way to unwind after a busy school year.
  • List three reasons why this is true:
  • The sounds of waves allows for meditation.
  • Laying on the beach is rejuvenating for the body/
  • Change of scenery invigorates the senses.
  • Now, turn these reasons into a sentence/attach it to the thesis:--use transitional phrases/words to aid in this exercise.
  • An island getaway is the perfect way to unwind after a busy school year in thatthe sound of the waves allows for meditation, laying on the beach is rejuvenating for the body, and a change of scenery invigorates the senses.
map statement practice1
Map Statement practice
  • Create a MAP sentence for each of these thesis statements:
  • Students should consider the brain-worthy benefits of leisure reading.
  • It is scientifically proven that sleep is beneficial for the growth of the brain.
  • School lunch should be healthy and nutritious.
map statement practice2
Map Statement practice
  • Students should consider the brain-worthy benefits of leisure reading.
  • Three Reasons:
  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • Thesis & Map together:
hooks1
Hooks
  • Hooks can come in the form of: personal experiences, observations, jokes, statistics, quotations, or questions.
intro paragraph practice
Intro Paragraph Practice
  • Peer editing is a way to see what your classmates are doing, help them, and help yourself. It is also a positive way to interact with your fellow classmates.
  • 1.) Write an introductory paragraph using the formula on the topic of self respect, make sure it has a Hook, Map, and Thesis statement
  • .2.) Exchange papers with your partner.3.) Using a red pen, revise any misspelled words, grammatical/punctuation errors.
  • 4.) Ask one question of the writer
  • 5.) Suggest 1-3 ways to improve the writing.
  • 6.) Write three reasons why you liked the writing—find three aspects you enjoyed (MUST)
  • 7.) Discuss your views, taking turns: (3 minutes/person)
topic sentences1
Topic Sentences

Write 1-2 sentences about this picture

topic sentences2
Topic Sentences
  • Write 1-2 sentences

About this picture:

topic sentences3
Topic Sentences

Finally, Write 1-2 sentences about this picture

evidence1
Evidence
  • Like a lawyer in a jury trial, a writer must convince her audience of the validity of her argument by using evidence effectively.
  • As a writer, you must also use evidence to persuade your readers to accept your claims, by leading your reader through your reasoning.
incorporating evidence
Incorporating Evidence
  • -Offer evidence that agrees with your stance up to a point, then add to it with ideas of your own.
  • -Present evidence that contradicts your stance, and then argue against (refute) that evidence and therefore strengthen your position.
  • -Use sources against each other, as if they were experts on a panel discussing your proposition.
  • -Use quotations to support your assertion, not merely to state or restate your claim.
evidence2
Evidence
  • Weak or strong: thumbs up or thumbs down:
  • Today, we are too self-centered. Most families no longer sit down to eat together, preferring instead to eat on the go while rushing to the next appointment (Gleick 148). Everything is about what we want.
  • This is a weak example of evidence because the evidence is not related to the claim. What does the claim about self-centeredness have to do with families eating together? The writer doesn't explain the connection.
evidence3
Evidence
  • Stronger use of evidence:
  • Today, Americans are too self-centered. Even our families don't matter as much anymore as they once did. Other people and activities take precedence. In fact, the evidence shows that most American families no longer eat together, preferring instead to eat on the go while rushing to the next appointment (Gleick 148). Sit-down meals are a time to share and connect with others; however, that connection has become less valued, as families begin to prize individual activities over shared time, promoting self-centeredness over group identity.
evidence4
Evidence
  • Ex 1:
  • Today, we are too self-centered. "We are consumers-on-the-run . . . the very notion of the family meal as a sit-down occasion is vanishing. Adults and children alike eat . . . on the way to their next activity" (Gleick 148). Everything is about what we want.
  • Ex 2:
  • Today, Americans are too self-centered. Even our families don't matter as much any more as they once did. Other people and activities take precedence, as James Gleick says in his book, Faster. "We are consumers-on-the-run . . . the very notion of the family meal as a sit-down occasion is vanishing. Adults and children alike eat . . . on the way to their next activity" (148). Sit-down meals are a time to share and connect with others; however, that connection has become less valued, as families begin to prize individual activities over shared time, promoting self-centeredness over group identity
evidence5
Evidence
  • Citing Your Sources
  • Evidence appears in essays in the form of quotations and paraphrasing. Both forms of evidence must be cited in your text. Citing evidence means distinguishing other writers' information from your own ideas and giving credit to your sources. There are plenty of general ways to do citations. Note both the lead-in phrases and the punctuation (except the brackets) in the following examples:
  • Quoting: According to Source X, "[direct quotation]" ([date or page #]).
  • Paraphrasing: Although Source Z argues that [his/her point in your own words], a better way to view the issue is [your own point] ([citation]).
  • Summarizing: In her book, Source P's main points are Q, R, and S [citation].
evidence6
Evidence
  • Bottom line, avoid accidental plagiarism, and give credit where credit is due.
  • Review:
  • Evidence should:
  • -agree with your stance
  • -be argued against to strengthen your claim.
  • -be used as sources that argue against each other.
  • -support your assertion and be completely relevant
evidence practice
Evidence Practice
  • Using the article highlight, underline, or circle the usage of evidence.

Questions:

  • How is evidence used effectively in this article?
  • What is the same about the evidence usage within the article?
  • How would you better use evidence if you were to re-write the article?
using evidence practice
Using Evidence Practice
  • Quoting: According to Source X, "[direct quotation]" ([date or page #]). [your commentary]
  • Paraphrasing: Although Source Z argues that [his/her point in your own words], a better way to view the issue is [your own point] ([citation]).
  • Summarizing: In her book, Source P's main points are Q, R, and S [citation].
using evidence practice1
Using Evidence Practice
  • Let’s try together.
  • Quote:
  • “Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.”
  • Mark Twain
  • Now, write a topic sentence that addresses the subject of the quote.
  • Now, explain the quote’s meaning and usage.
using evidence commentary
Using Evidence/commentary
  • Topic Sentence:
  • Quote:
  • Commentary:
using evidence commentary1
Using Evidence/commentary
  • Your turn—try this one on your own:
  • Quote: “Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people. “—Eleanor Roosevelt
  • Topic sentence about this subject:
  • Commentary:
  • Now, put the components into their correct positions (Topic sentence; quote with a transitional phrase; commentary)
using evidence commentary group work
Using Evidence/Commentary Group Work
  • 1. Read the quote, figure out what claim about life it it making in your group.
  • 2. Write a paragraph using the quote effectively.
  • 3. Write paragraph on a piece of paper that has both of your names on it. Be sure that you are using the quote and claim effectively.
  • Work together to complete the assignment.
  • 5. This will be collected at the end of the period
concluding paragraphs
Concluding Paragraphs
  • --concluding paragraphs restate the information in the introductory paragraph, but use different words to do so.
  • Concluding paragraphs should also restate (in different words of course) the map or thesis statement.
  • So, let’s try this together:
concluding paragraphs1
Concluding Paragraphs
  • Turn this intro paragraph into a concluding paragraph.
  • “What is self respect? Having self respect is a huge deal for me and others. If you don’t have self respect, how are others supposed to respect you? Disrespect is putting yourself down, not dressing appropriately. Lacking self respect might looks like not being yourself, but being what others what you to be. Self respect is one aspect we can all have. If you respect yourself, others will respect you as well.”
  • Highlight the main ideas in the paragraph, write them down.
  • Reword the main ideas.
  • Create a paragraph based on the main ideas you have reworded.
concluding paragraphs2
Concluding Paragraphs
  • You try:
  • Introductory Paragraph:
  • “Self respect is something everyone should have because it reflects the way that others view you. The reason it is important is because later in the future, people will judge you based on the way you treat yourself and others. The benefits of self respect are confidence in yourself, not having to worry about what others think, and a happy life.”
  • Identify main ideas:
  • Reword main ideas:
  • Create a paragraph:
concluding paragraphs3
Concluding paragraphs

You try; Intro paragraph:

  • “Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft, could spend one million dollars per day, every day, seven days a week and would not run out of money until he was 311 years old! Most would agree that he has reached a point of financial security. In fact, it would be almost impossible to figure out how one could spend one million dollars per day. For most Americans, finding an occupation that is satisfying, earning enough money to live comfortably, and figuring out a realistic blend between work and leisure are three essential factors in beginning one’s career.”
  • Main ideas:
  • Reword:
  • Rewrite