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  1. Revision Example

  2. Process Essay Three parts 1. Intro identifies the process & indicates why and under what circumstances it is performed. II. Body paragraphs each treat one major stage of the process. Steps may be grouped together. These are presented in chronological order, interrupted only for essential definitions, explanations, or cautions. III. Conclusion should summarize where you stand now as a writer and what grade you believe you deserve in this class. Tips & Tricks Use consistent verb tense, person, voice, and mood. Verb Tense: past or present Person: first or second Voice: active or passive Mood: statements or commands Unnecessary shifts can confuse readers and make it difficult to follow the process.

  3. Dynamics of a Chinese Matrimony in the 20th Century Marriages in China have been known for many centuries as arranged marriages that act more like business transactions that any romance-filled relationship modern people think of when they hear of two people marrying. “Many people experienced what could be called a “blind marriage,” in which the parents monopolized the decision (with the aid of hired go-betweens), and the couple did not even meet until the day of the wedding” (Xiaohe 714). Young women virtually had no say in their pending marriages in the early 20th century; “there was no question of consulting his daughter. Marriage was a transaction, not a matter of feelings” (Chang 28).

  4. The Dynamics of Chinese Matrimony in the Twentieth Century Even as recently as the early 1900s, marriages in China were, generally, arranged marriages that seemed more like business transactions than a romance-filled relationship, which is a particularly western view of marriage. Xu Xiaohe, in an article discussing arranged marriages in the early twentieth century, wrote that “many people experienced what could be called a ‘blind marriage,’ in which the parents monopolized the decision (with the aid of hired go-betweens), and the couple did not even meet until the day of the wedding” (Xiaohe 714). These weddings were highly impersonal, rarely taking into account the young person's opinion on the matter. Even more so, young women virtually had no say in their pending marriages, which Jung Chang mentions in her book Wild Swans, when writing about her grandmother's 'marriage' to General Xue in 1924; “there was no question of consulting his [Yang Ru-shan's] daughter [Yu-fang]. Marriage was a transaction, not a matter of feelings” (Chang 28).

  5. The Dynamics of Chinese Matrimony in the Twentieth Century In ancient China, there were generally two types of arranged marriages, 'major' marriages, and 'minor' marriages, a tradition that carried through the early twentieth century, and in some remote places, into nearly present day. Major marriages were the well-known arranged marriage, where two families would send go-betweens to come to an agreement, a large dowry and price paid for the bride, and a large ceremony held before the daughter would become a wife. These marriages were called major marriages because they were the culturally preferred way of marrying and acquiring a daughter-in-law (Wolf 866). XuXiaohe, in an article discussing arranged marriages in the early twentieth century, wrote that “many people experienced what could be called a 'blind marriage,' in which the parents monopolized the decision (with the aid of hired go-betweens), and the couple did not even meet until the day of the wedding” (Xiaohe 714). These weddings were highly impersonal, rarely taking into account the young person's opinion on the matter. Even more so, young women virtually had no say in their pending marriages, which Jung Chang mentioned in her book Wild Swans, when she wrote of her grandmother's 'marriage' to General Xue in 1924; “there was no question of consulting his [Yang Ru-shan's] daughter [Yu-fang]. Marriage was a transaction, not a matter of feelings” (Chang 28).