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Energize Your Classroom: Innovative Teaching Techniques. Dr. Scott D. Lipscomb UTSA Division of Music Summer Teaching Institute (May 1998) sponsored by the UTSA Teaching & Learning Center. Excerpting Shamelessly from ….

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energize your classroom innovative teaching techniques

Energize Your Classroom:Innovative Teaching Techniques

Dr. Scott D. Lipscomb

UTSA Division of Music

Summer Teaching Institute (May 1998)

sponsored by the

UTSA Teaching & Learning Center

excerpting shamelessly from
Excerpting Shamelessly from …
  • Larry Michaelson - “Designing Productive and Involving Team-Learning Tasks
  • Dee Fink - “Developing and Assessing Learning Objectives”
  • Marilla Svinicki - “Teaching Abstract Concepts to Diverse Learners”
  • Susan Nummedal - “Using Classroom Assessment Techniques to Improve Student Learning”
  • Barbary L. McCombs & Patricia A Lauer - “Impact of Learner-Centered Instruction on Student Motivation and Academic Performance” and “Defining and Assessing Learner-Centeredness in Your Classroom”

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

bloom s taxonomy of educational objectives in the cognitive domain 1956
Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives… in the Cognitive Domain (1956)
  • Knowledge
  • Comprehension
  • Application
  • Analysis
  • Synthesis
  • Evaluation

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

specific teaching techniques
Specific Teaching Techniques
  • Develop Clear Learning Objectives
    • methods of assessment
  • Motivate Students
    • Incorporate Team-Learning Tasks to Engage Students
      • assignment to groups
    • Readiness Assessment Tests (RATs)
      • not everything must be covered in class

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

teacher beliefs survey

Teacher Beliefs Survey

Where Do You Stand?

statement of objectives higher levels of learning
Statement of Objectives ...Higher Levels of Learning
  • Coming to KNOW …
  • How to THINK about …
  • How to DO … [something]
  • How to KEEP ON LEARNING about ...
  • Working with one’s SELF on …
  • Interacting with OTHERS …

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

diverse learners learning abstract concepts involves
Diverse Learners:Learning Abstract Concepts Involves …
  • studying one or more prototypical examples of a concept, getting a definition
    • poor learners stop here … memorize the prototype
  • examining the features of multiple examples (and non-examples)
    • average learners stop here and use the categories they see to classify new examples

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

good learners
Good Learners:
  • Generate hypothesis about the concept
  • Test the hypothesis with new examples and non-examples, getting feedback
  • Reconsider (or re-examine) examples in light of this feedback

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

the scientific method
The Scientific Method
  • Ask a question of the Real World
  • Review research literature
  • Design study
  • Collect Data
  • Analyze & Interpret Data
  • Propose or reassess model
  • Submit model to further tests

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

characteristics of learners that affect learning
Characteristics of LearnersThat Affect Learning
  • Content Issues
  • Cognitive Issues
  • Motivation Issues

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

characteristics of learners content issues
Characteristics of Learners:Content Issues
  • Prior knowledge and experience
  • Structural knowledge
    • concept map of how discipline is put together
  • Language deficits
  • Technical skills

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

characteristics of learners cognitive issues
Characteristics of Learners:Cognitive Issues
  • Level of formal reasoning
  • Level of epistemology
  • Processing preferences
  • Learning strategies
  • Metacognitive awareness

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

characteristics of learners motivation issues
Characteristics of Learners:Motivation Issues
  • Goal orientation
    • Mastery goals vs. Performance goals
  • Level of task-specific motivation
  • Self-efficacy for area
  • Self-concept as student

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

understanding motivation to learn
Understanding Motivation to Learn
  • Learning & motivation to learn are natural human capacities in social contexts that are supportive of the learner and in content domains perceived as personally relevant and meaningful.
  • What & how much is learned is a function of each learner’s view of him or herself and the learning process, including self-concepts of ability, personal goals, expectations, and interpretations of task requirements.
  • Insecurities and other forms of negative cognitive conditioning interfere with or block the emergence of learners’ natural motivation to learn.
    • Handout - “How Schools Stifle Motivation”

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

motivational outcomes associated with learner centered practices
Motivational Outcomes Associated with Learner-Centered Practices
  • engage in independent learning activities
  • seek out further information about topics of interest
  • want to learn more about a range of topics and interests
  • continue to refine skills in chosen area
  • go beyond minimal assignments

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

motivational outcomes associated with learner centered practices16
Motivational Outcomes Associated with Learner-Centered Practices
  • are willing to persist in the face of learning challenges
  • take responsibility for their own learning
  • engage in learning for understanding vs. grades
  • are involved with learning and school governance decisions
  • achieve high academic & personal standards

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

what is learner centered
What is “Learner-Centered?”
  • a research-based framework
  • focused on well-defined content standards and defined learning objectives
  • focused on human needs related to motivation and learning
  • a balance of teacher and student control
  • a balance of learner and learning needs
  • concerned with high levels of learning and motivation
  • rigorous and challenging
  • shared teacher and student responsibility for learning and achievement

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

learner centered instruction
Learner-Centered Instruction
  • 14 Learner-Centered Psychological Principles
    • Cognitive & Metacognitive Factors
    • Motivational & Affective Factors
    • Developmental Factors
    • Individual Differences Factors

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

learner centered psychological principles cognitive metacognitive factors
Learner-Centered Psychological Principles: Cognitive & Metacognitive Factors
  • Nature of the Learning Process
  • Goals of the Learning Process
  • Construction of Knowledge
  • Strategic Thinking
  • Thinking about Thinking
  • Context of Learning

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

learner centered psychological principles motivational affective factors
Learner-Centered Psychological Principles:Motivational & Affective Factors
  • Motivational & Emotional Influences on Learning
  • Intrinsic Motivation to Learn
  • Effects of Motivation on Effort

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

learner centered psychological principles developmental factors
Learner-Centered Psychological Principles:Developmental Factors
  • Developmental Influences on Learning
  • Social Influences on Learning

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

learner centered psychological principles individual differences factors
Learner-Centered Psychological Principles:Individual Differences Factors
  • Individual Differences in Learning
  • Learning & Diversity
  • Standards & Assessment

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

team learning

Team-Learning

Assignment to Groups

activity 1 what characteristics make concepts difficult
Activity 1: What Characteristics Make Concepts Difficult?
  • List several concepts from your own area that you have found are difficult for students
  • List several general concepts—not from any particular field—that are difficult to understand (e.g., truth, beauty, etc.)
  • Working with several colleagues, compile a list of your general concepts. Then examine them for what they have in common that caused you to add them to the list. Are there characteristics that difficult concepts have in common?

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

team learning the development of higher level cognitive skills
Team Learning & the Developmentof Higher-Level Cognitive Skills

Effect of Small Group Discussion

on Sources of Information for Learning

Complex Concepts

and Applications

Basic

Concepts

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

assessment the rsqc 2 technique
Assessment:The “RSQC2” Technique
  • Recall: List the most interesting, useful, and/or significant points you can recall from the previous session
  • Summarize: Summarize the important points you can recall in one meaningful, grammatically correct sentence
  • Question: Raise any remaining questions you have about that session
  • Comment: Write down a word or phrase describing how you felt about that session while you were in it
  • Connect: Connect what you learned in that session with what came before, what comes next, or with your own experience, with professional experience, or with information from another course ...

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

learner centered instruction stages of change
Learner-Centered Instruction:Stages of Change
  • Phase I - Developing Awareness, Will to Change, and Ownership of Need to Change
    • showing change is possible, inspiring hope
  • Phase II - Observing Models & Building Understanding of Personal Domain Practices
    • seeing models, discussing “what and how”
  • Phase III - Adapting Strategies, Building Skills, and Developing Personal Responsibility for Continuous Learning & Change
    • tailoring strategies, coaching, trying out, revising
  • Phase IV - Adopting & Sustaining Attitudes and Practices that Contribute to Continuous Learning and Self Development
    • on-going self-assessment, networking, support

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998

effective course design integrating these teaching techniques
Effective Course Design:Integrating These Teaching Techniques
  • What do you want students to be able to do when they have completed your course?
  • What will students have to know to do #1?
  • How can you identify the concepts students have successfully mastered through individual study or group activities?
  • How can you tell if students will be able to use their knowledge?

Lipscomb - Summer Teaching Institute 1998