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Mad and magnificent:. The Briton going round the world by bike, rollerblade and pedalo. In an expedition lasting more than 13 years and spanning around 46,000 miles, Jason Lewis has run, swam and cycled around the world, crossing oceans and seas in a cramped pedal-powered BOAT.

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slide4

Mad and magnificent:

The Briton going round the world

by bike, rollerblade and pedalo

the guardian saturday october 6 2007

In an expedition lasting more than 13 years and spanning around 46,000 miles, Jason Lewis has run, swam and cycled around the world, crossing oceans and seas in a cramped pedal-powered BOAT

THE GUARDIAN,

Saturday

October 6 2007

slide6
Jason Lewis completed his round-the-world trip yesterday. It took 13 years, two months, and 23 days. Lewis is the first person to ever travel around the world using only his own power. He walked, bicycled, paddled, skated, kayaked,

and pedalled his way across 46,000 miles across

five continents, two oceans and one sea.

He has been injured, chased by a crocodile, menaced by pirates, and questioned as a suspected spy.

a true circumnavigation of the earth must
A true circumnavigation of the earth must:
  • Start and finish at

the same point

- Travel in one

general direction

  • Reach two antipodes (Two diametrically opposite places on Earth).
  • Cross the equator Cross all longitudes Cover a minimum of 40,000km (a great circle)
slide8
Expedition 360 was a successful attempt at one of the last great firsts for true circumnavigation: reaching antipodal points on the surface of the globe using only human power (no motors or sails). Bicycles, in-line skates, kayaks, swimming, rowing, walking and a unique pedal powered boat were used by Englishman Jason Lewis and an international team to travel across five continents, two oceans and one sea (12th July 1994 - 6th October 2007).
slide9
Lewis originally

travelled with Steve Smith, a university friend who first came up with the idea of travelling around the world using only human power.

slide11

Back in February 1995, Steve Smith and Jason Lewis completed the first-ever, east-west Atlantic crossing in a pedal boat. During the 111-day voyage to Miami they had a near miss with a trawler, a whale threatened to tip them over, and Jason was washed overboard when their craft capsized.

slide12
Arriving in the US the pair decided to go their separate ways. Steve chose to mountain bike, while Jason travelled the 3,500-mile trip across America on inline skates. On the way he was threatened by gun-wielding locals in Alabama, then in Colorado in September 1995, he broke both his legs when was run down by an 82-year-old driver. He had to spend nine months recuperating before completing the first inline skate crossing of the US.
slide13
Months later, differences resolved, Jason and Steve pedal-boated for 54 days to cover the 2,400 miles from San Francisco to Hawaii.
slide14
Smith then left the journey in 1998 to write a book about the first stages while Lewis continued with the help of a string of volunteers who joined him for various legs.
  • Jason pedalled solo the 2,400 miles to the Pacific atoll of Tarawa. At one stage a shark repeatedly attacked the craft's

spinning

propeller.

slide15
Over the years, on land and sea, his adventures also included a close encounter with a Cuban gunboat, hitting a reef in the Caribbean and cycling for miles at night to dodge Chinese police in Asia.

Other hazards that he faced in the cramped boat included an attack by a 15ft crocodile in Australia. It chased his craft for 100m and pursued Jason up a beach - biting off his paddle blade when he tried to fend it off.

slide16
He also drove off robbers with a knife in India and hit a sunken wreck in the Arabian Sea. He was questioned by the Egyptian military as a potential spy after kayaking from Sudan into their waters without permission.

He underwent surgery for two hernias,

nearly died of blood poisoning 1,300 miles

out to sea from Hawaii, stumbled upon a

civil war in the Solomon Islands, suffered

acute altitude sickness while biking over the Himalayas.

slide18

With no major sponsor for much of the expedition, Lewis faced a constant battle to raise cash to keep the odyssey going - even working as a cattle drover in the US and in a funeral parlour in Australia.

  • He sold T-shirts and did odd jobs to raise money, and then kept going.
  • He fell in love, but said goodbye and kept going.
slide22
But he said

the good parts

of the journey

more than compensated for his ordeals.

  • "There have been many high moments.To be honest, it's always good to reach the other side of an ocean. If it was just about the physical challenge, I would have got bored. “
slide24

London's Millennium Dome comes into sight on the last leg his global journey up the Thames to Greenwich - a building that didn't even exist when he first set out.

slide26

British adventurer Jason Lewis moores his 26-foot yellow pedal craft on the River Thames at the Meridian Line in front of the Royal Naval College in Greenwich, London, from where his expedition began in 1994.

slide27
Fox news.com:

Oct. 6,2007 : Jason Lewis

waves from his 26-foot

yellow pedal craft on the

Thames River at the

Meridian Line at the Royal

Observatory in Greenwich,

London.

slide28

Jason Lewis and supporters haul is pedal-powered boat, Moksha,toward the Royal Greenwich Observatory, London, ending his thirteen-year human-powered circumnavigation of the world.

slide29
“Thirteen years, coming to an end. It's been a big, long journey. It's good to be back,” Lewis said simply as he pushed his 26-foot-long pedal boat, now resting on a trailer, across the famous cobblestone courtyard outside the Greenwich Royal Observatory.
slide30
"I'M OVERWHELMED, I'M OVERWHELMED,"

LEWIS TOLD SKY NEWS

TELEVISION JUST AFTER

STEPPING ACROSS THE

MERIDIAN. HE STRUGGLED

FOR WORDS AS HE

DESCRIBED HIS FEELINGS

AT THE CLOSE OF HIS ODYSSEY,

WHICH BROUGHT HIM

AROUND THE WORLD,

POWERED ONLY BY HIS ARMS AND LEGS.

"IT'S BEEN MY LIFE, FOR 13 YEARS, I'VE PUT EVERYTHING INTO THIS,"HE SAID.

slide31
Among the welcoming party was Queen Elizabeth II's cousin, the Duke of Gloucester, who is patron to the Expedition 360 adventure and who named Moksha in 1993. The name means "liberation" in Sanskrit.
  • A homecoming lecture is already booked at the Royal Geographical Society. "This trip was always about teaching people about the rest of the world and the environment”.
slide32
Now he's back in Dorset, Jason has time to reflect on his impressive achievement. Not only has he circumnavigated the globe by human power, he's also raised $65,000 for schools and hospices in some of the most deprived regions of the world.

On a personal level, Jason says he's got to grips with who he is and gained an insight into diverse cultures - realising that the similarities outweigh the differences between people across the globe.

( BBC Dorset, October 17, 2007)

Lewis said

he planned to rest this weekend before embarking on a career organising "mini-

expeditions" for young people and giving talks about climate change.

( SAWF news)

internet blogger
“Expedition 360 describes their effort

as "a vehicle for young people to explore the world, an educational tool for the classroom and a way for children from different cultures to make connections with each other." What an amazing vision. I find these guys to be totally inspiring. Anyone who can break free of the herd mentality and do something that no one has done before - with no special gifts, but just using the sheer power of their persons - to me that is genius. In the end, genius is courage. “

internet blogger:
slide34
In addition to the

education programme, Expedition 360, as Lewis' journey is known, raises funds for children's charities that have inspired him along the way, including an orphanage in East Timor and a home for the poor in Mumbai.

Looking ahead, Lewis says he probably has a book in him and he relishes the chance to put down roots after so many years on the road.

"That's been the hardest part, always saying goodbye... the lack of community and people who know you for more than a few weeks."

(BBC News, October 7, 2007)

slide35

“Now 13 years have passed.

It's October 2007 and Jason Lewis has come home.

One chapter of his life is closing and

a new one beginning. And what about you?

What's your great adventure and

what will you be doing over the next 13 years?

Just put on your 2020 vision

and start pedalling! “

slide36

“It's the journey

- not the

destination-

that is important! “

- Said Jason Lewis, 17 days ago

slide37
“This story had a profound impact on me because I think it shows how simple the "goal creation" process can be. Start with the desired vision, see yourself in some action-taking role, and then get going. “

(Mark McClure,Tokyo-based goal mentoring coach and Internet business owner)

slide38
What does the name MOKSHA mean?
  • How did he come up with the money to continue his journey?
  • When did their expedition begin?
  • Whose idea was to circumnavigate around the world?
  • When do you believe he must have been considering giving up?
slide39
How might he have felt when Steve left the expedition? What do you think may have made him go on?
  • What does the word CIRCUMNAVIGATION mean?

Where did his expedition start and end?

  • What does “ human powered expedition” mean?
slide40

Jason Lewis, born 1967 in CatterickUK, is a self-powered Britishcircumnavigator.

  • He set off from Greenwich, London in July, 1994 to travel round the globe (Expedition 360), and had travelled over 60,000 km (37,000 miles) by July 2007. He finally ended his expedition on the sixth of October 2007 having travelled 74,842 km (46,505 miles).
  • Lewis crossed the Atlantic and Pacific oceans in a wooden pedal boat.
  • He roller bladed across North America. Struck by a driver in Pueblo, Colorado, he spent nine months recovering from two broken legs, returning to the trek in May 1996.
slide41

He kayaked from Australia to Singapore.

  • He biked from Singapore to the Himalayas.
  • He hiked through the Himalayas.
  • He pedaloed from Mumbai, India crossing the Indian Ocean to Djibouti.
  • He then planned to travel through Ethiopia, Sudan, Egypt, the Middle East before reaching Europe — however, he encountered a problem in Sudan. The Egyptian authorities would not let him pass through their waters.
slide42
He attempted to kayak across Lake Nasser to Abu Simbel but was arrested on suspicion of spying. He was released but the Egyptian authorities forbade him from mountain-biking the 178 mile journey to Aswan.

In July 2007, he reached Syria and then crossed Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, Austria, Germany, and Belgium before returning to London on 6 October.

Lewis expected the journey to last 3.5 years, but due to the many difficulties he faced, as mentioned above, the journey extended to 13 years. Other factors of delay were two broken legs, a bout of depression and a crocodile attack.

slide43
Lewis, from Dorset, said he may lodge a claim with the Guinness Book of Records. However its guidelines state that each leg of the journey has to start where the previous one finished, and the legs have to be completed in order.
  • Lewis failed on this point when his boat was towed into Australia by a motorized vessel because it was in danger of being washed on to the Barrier Reef, and wrecked. He then continued by bicycle.
  • Although he later returned to complete the leg of the journey he had missed, it had to be done out of order because of the poor weather, he said. "I don't know how they (Guinness) would view the 20 miles out of sequence."
slide44
In 2006, Canadians Colin Angus and Julie Wafaei completed a human powered circumnavigation, taking 720 days to cycle, ski, canoe, walk and row around the world.
  • They started and finished in Vancouver, Canada, but they did not achieve a Guinness World Record because they did not cross the equator.
  • Lewis said he hoped to have his feat acknowledged by ExplorersWeb, which collates statistics and has a category for the first circumnavigation around the world by human power.
  • He said: "They know about the 20 miles I have done out of sequence. But their stipulation is that legs are done in one general direction. Assuming that everything else is in order they would accept my claim."
slide45
1. Deed = feat

2. Follow = pursue

3. to evade, elude = dodge

4. to absorb, swallow= immerse

5. bronzed = tanned

6. comprehension = grasp

slide46
1. Danger - safety
  • 2. Fat - lean
  • 3. To have plenty of something - to lack
  • 4. To advance, progress - to move on
  • 5. inappropriate - suitable
  • 6. broad, wide - narrow
slide47
How much did the expedition last exactly?

What does Jason say kept him going?

Why did he have problems with the French authorities?

How does he perceive himself after 13 years?

slide48
NOW WRITE 3 QUESTIONS FOR YOUR COLLEAGUES

-BASED ON THE INFORMATION IN THE ARTICLE

slide49
GIVING A PUBLIC TALK
  • “HOPE”
  • PRINTED T-SHIRTS
  • MUCH BUREAUCRACY WHEN WAITING FOR SOMETHING
  • MASS TOURISM
  • November 5, 2001
  • TRYING TO BECOME BETTER AT LANGUAGE
  • HEAVEN INDEED, BUT NO WATER!
  • REASONS FOR THE LONG DURATION
slide50
FAMILIES BEGGING
  • glorious autumn afternoon
  • ALMOST CLOSED CIRCLE
  • 1868
  • KENNY’S WORDS
  • OCEAN RING
slide51

“It's the journey

- not the

destination-

that is important! “

- Said Jason Lewis, 18 days ago