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Eyetracking. Mike Birnstiehl English 568. What is Eyetracking?. Definitions Saccade: A quick movement of the eye in order to move focus from one area to the next. Fixation: The time spent looking at the newly found area. AOI: Area of Interest

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eyetracking

Eyetracking

Mike Birnstiehl

English 568

what is eyetracking
What is Eyetracking?
  • Definitions
    • Saccade: A quick movement of the eye in order to move focus from one area to the next.
    • Fixation: The time spent looking at the newly found area.
    • AOI: Area of Interest
    • Eyetracking: A technique used to determine the eye movement and eye-fixation patterns of a user.
what is eyetracking1
What is Eyetracking?
  • Saccade and fixation
    • Not random
    • What is important
  • Eyetracking vs. other testing methods
why is it important
Why is it Important?
  • “The Added Value of Eyetracking in the Usability Evaluation of a Network Management tool”
  • Task 1: The participants were required to start the system and to determine whether new delay metrics have been collected.
how do designers obtain this information
How do Designers Obtain this Information?
  • Multiple ways to track where a user looks
    • Sensors attached to the user’s face
    • Head-mounted video systems
    • Restrictive video-based system
    • Non-contact, non-restrictive video-based system
how do designers obtain this information2
How Do Designers Obtain this Information?
  • “The eyetracking equipment we use for our research...Looks like a normal computer… that's exactly the point, because we want users to work normally.”
how do designers obtain this information3
How do Designers Obtain this Information?
  • Compiling information
    • Heat maps
how do designers use this information
How Do Designers Use this Information?
  • Variety of fields
    • Software design
    • Web design
    • Advertising
how do designers use this information1
How Do Designers Use this Information?
  • Software design
    • Effective Interface
    • Easy to use
  • Web design
    • F-shape pattern reading
    • Not all media types are interchangeable
how do designers use this information3
How Do Designers Use this Information?
  • Not all media types are interchangeable
how do designers use this information4
How Do Designers Use this Information?
  • Advertising
    • Banner blindness
    • Advertisement location
how do designers use this information6
How Do Designers Use this Information?
  • Banner blindness and Advertisement Location
    • Top left, mid-left and center are the top regions where users first fixate.
    • Maximize advertisement fixation by using the best location.
sources
Sources
  • Calitz, Andre P., Marco C. Pretorius, and Darelle van Greunen. “The Added Value of eyetracking in the Usability Evaluation of a Network Management Tool.” ACM. San Diego, 2006.
  • Gay, Geri, Laura Granka, and Helene Hembrooke. “Location Location Location: Viewing patterns on WWW pages.” ACM. San Diego, 2006.
  • Goldberg, Joseph H., Marion Lewenstein, Neil Scott, Mark J. Stimson, and Anna M. Wichansky. “eyetracking in Web Search Tasks: Design Implications.” ACM. San Diego, 2002.
  • Hennessey, Craig, Peter Lawrence, and Borna Noureddin. “A Single Camera Eye-Gaze Tracking System with Free Head Motion.” ACM. San Diego, 2006.
  • Nielsen, Jakob. useit.com: Jakob Nielsen’s Website, 2008, http://www.useit.com.