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Tufted Fabrics Presentation #14 PowerPoint Presentation
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Tufted Fabrics Presentation #14

Tufted Fabrics Presentation #14

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Tufted Fabrics Presentation #14

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  1. Tufted Fabrics Presentation #14

  2. What are tufted fabrics and what are they used for? • Fabrics formed by stitching yarns through a backing • Woven • Non-woven • Stitched yarns provide a 3rd dimension • Face Yarns • Must be anchored in or else will pull out.

  3. What are tufted fabrics and what are they used for? • Uses • Carpets and rugs • Upholstery fabric (give ribs similar to corduroy) • Why? • Less expensive than the woven fabrics that they are meant to replace • Production rates • Yarn preparation

  4. How is it done?

  5. Components of a tufted carpet • Pile • Primary backing • Adhesive/filler • Secondary backing

  6. Pile • Yarn that appears on the face of the fabric • Varies in both loop type (looped or cut) and height • Fiber types • Nylon (most common) • Polypropylene (common in Europe) • Polyester • Wool • Cotton • Silk (rare) • The pile makes up about 60% of the fabric weight and is the major cost item.

  7. Nylon Both 6 and 6,6, but 6,6 more common Excellent wear and resiliency “Carpets don’t wear out, the ‘ugly’ out.” Susceptible to stain Hydrophilic Oleophilic Static discharge Polypropylene Good wear Poor resiliency Inexpensive Difficult to stain with water-borne stains (wine, Kool-Aid®, etc.) Static discharge Fiber types

  8. Polyester Good wear Fair resiliency Hydrophobic Static discharge Wool Good resiliency Prone to wear out Hydrophilic Susceptible to attack by micro & macro organisms Fiber types

  9. Cotton Fair resiliency Fair-to-good wear Hydrophilic Generally used for inexpensive carpets and rugs Silk Expensive Hydrophilic Rare (used often for wall hanging) Fibers

  10. Primary backing • Fabric that tufts are stitched through • Woven • Jute • Polypropylene • Nonwoven (random generally) • Polypropylene • Nylon • Polyester • Used in inexpensive carpeting and upholstery • Makes up approximately 5% of the carpet weight

  11. Adhesive • Usually latex-based • Filled with calcium carbonate (CaCO3). • Anchors the tufts into the primary backing • Gives carpet its ‘hand’ and makes up about 30% of the weight.

  12. Secondary Backing • Optional—in some less expensive carpets the secondary backing is eliminated entirely • Usually a woven fabric • Historically jute • Resistant to attack by mold and microorganisms • Hydrophilic • Polypropylene often used • Completely resistant to mold & microorganisms • Sometimes a foam secondary backing is used • Further protection for the back of the tufts • The secondary backing provides the remainder of the carpet weight (35%).

  13. Pile types • Looped pile • Ends of tufts continuous • Cut pile • Pile hook has a sharp area • High/low pile • Needle penetration depth • Yarn tension

  14. Carpet types Ref: Yeager, J., Textiles for Residential and Commercial Interiors. Harper & Row, NY, 1988.

  15. Where/what used • Saxonies and plushes are the more commonly found varieties in the home • Level loop carpets are often used in contract interiors and • Shag carpets, are commonly found in furnished apartments • Good coverage with little face yarn.