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Database for Energy Efficiency Resource User Demonstration. Jennifer Barnes Pacific Energy Center October 11, 2005. What is DEER?. A collection of data for Residential and Non-Residential energy efficiency measures. http://eega.cpuc.ca.gov/deer/ It provides a common set of:

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Database for Energy Efficiency Resource User Demonstration


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    1. Database for Energy Efficiency Resource User Demonstration Jennifer Barnes Pacific Energy Center October 11, 2005

    2. What is DEER? • A collection of data for Residential and Non-Residential energy efficiency measures. • http://eega.cpuc.ca.gov/deer/ • It provides a common set of: • Ex ante Savings values: • kW, kWh, kBtu • Measure Costs • Effective Measure Life (a.k.a EUL)

    3. Website Navigation • Measures categorized by • Residential and non-residential • Weather sensitive and non-weather sensitive • Non-weather sensitive measure impacts determined through engineering calculations • Savings do not vary by climate zone or vintage, only building type

    4. Weather sensitive measures • Weather sensitive measure impacts simulated using DOE2/eQUEST • Single family, multifamily, mobile homes, and 22 non-residential building types • Five building vintages • 16 climate zones • Two levels of savings • Customer savings - for system savings and early replacement savings. • “Above Code” Savings - for all measures affected by an energy code or standard (reportable savings for replace on burnout)

    5. Common Units • Describes the normalizing unit • Per ton, lamp, household, linear feet, cloths dryer, etc. • The energy and cost common units are distinct • Over 90% of cases, they are the same • When different, distinctly identified

    6. Measure Costs • Application – indicates if the cost is for: • Retrofit (RET) - replacing a working system with a new technology or adding a technology • Replace-on-burnout (ROB) - replacing a technology at the end of its useful life • New construction or major renovation (NEW) - installing a technology in a new construction or major renovation • Cost Basis – indicates if the cost is: • Incremental (INCR) - the differential cost between a base technology and an energy efficient technology • Installed (FULL) - the full or installed cost of the measure including equipment, labor, overhead & profit (OH&P)

    7. Notable Changes • Eliminated coin-operated high efficiency clothes washers and hot water heater tank wrap • T-12 removed from DEER as a base case because of new federal guidelines. However, it may be legitimate in lamp/ballast (only) change outs. • Programmable thermostats savings diminished: • Change in residential assumptions • Programmable thermostats or time clocks required by code since 1992 • A/C savings reduced due to stricter code requirements

    8. CFL Changes • Integral versus modular • Modular – hardwired ballast with replaceable lamp. 16 year life (res.) • Integral – lamp and ballast are “fused.” 9.4 year life (res.) • In service factor – applied to CFLs to account for units not in operation • Non-res. CLF – “SPC” – assumes that all units are installed and operational • Non-res. CFL – in service factor of .92 • Residential CFL – in service factor of .9 • No in service factor for table lamps and torchieres

    9. Website Navigation – Opening Screen

    10. Website Navigation – Browse Measures

    11. Website Navigation – Select Subcategory

    12. Website Navigation – Review Summary Page - Top

    13. Run ID • String variable of fixed length of 13 with the format: ABBB1122CCCCC where: • A = Sector Code. ‘R’ = Residential and ‘C’ = Commercial • BBB = Building type abbreviation (see codes under Building Type) • 11 = Climate zone (see codes under Climate Zone) • 22 = Vintage (see codes under Vintage) • CCCCC = Measure abbreviation • Measure ID - String variable of fixed length of 7 • (example: D03-001)

    14. Website Navigation – Review Summary Page - Bottom

    15. Website Navigation – Detailed Measure Information

    16. Website Navigation – Detailed Measure information - Top

    17. Website Navigation – Detailed Measure information - Bottom

    18. Supporting Documents Section • Website Users Guide • Net-to-Gross Ratios Table (Use .8 if in doubt) • Access Tables • Glossary • Cost Data • Cost Data User’s Guide • New EUL Estimates 7-14-05 (SERA Report) • Consolidated Measure Data

    19. Supporting Documents Section – Consolidated Measure Data

    20. Questions/Comments?

    21. DEER Measure Cost Detail

    22. Defining Cost ParametersMeasure Cost Specifications (Cont.) • Cost data is first cost only -- life cycle or O&M costs/cost savings not included • Pricing reflects commonly available “standard” products and excludes specialty, high-end items • Some price observations (outliers) were excluded to assume a rational purchasing policy would be used (“who would pay THAT?”) • Equipment and labor prices are specific to California to extent possible but average across state

    23. Defining Cost ParametersKey Cost Definitions • Cost Observation – a single price point for an individual measure or measure configuration • Cost values are what a program participant would pay to implement the measure consistent with definitions in the CA Standard Practice Manual (initial capital cost) • Cost units ($ / ton, $ / HP, $ / square foot, etc.) • Mostly the same although different for some measures • Distinct field in detailed cost data; appended to Cost Basis designator in measure detail

    24. Data Collection and Analysis ProcessLabor Cost Estimates • Labor cost estimates generally base on manhours required to complete task times appropriate wage rate • Wage rate based on trade (electrician, plumber, etc.) and geographic location of activity • RS Means used to provide wage rate and location adjustment multipliers

    25. Website and on-site cost surveys of retailers Cost quotes from manufacturers, manufacturers sales representatives, and distributors Cost surveys of contractors and design professionals. Cost data from in California DSM program files, particularly local programs Secondary sources and reports Data Collection and Analysis Process Cost Data Sources

    26. Excel based cost analysis workbook developed for each measure. Each workbook has 5 sections: Data Collection and Analysis Process Cost Analysis Workbooks

    27. Data Collection and Analysis Process Cost Analysis Workbooks – Raw Data • Example of the ‘Raw Data’ section of the High Efficiency Electric Clothes Dryer workbook

    28. Data Collection and Analysis Process Cost Analysis Workbooks – Cost Results • Example of the ‘Results’ section of the High Efficiency Electric Clothes Dryer workbook

    29. Data Collection and Analysis Process Cost Analysis Workbooks – Statistical Summary • Example of the ‘Statistical Summary’ section of the High Efficiency Electric Clothes Dryer workbook

    30. How to find the most applicable cost information? Measure detail pages for each run ID - the per unit equipment measure cost of $13.65 for all 90% residential furnaces This provides an average cost based on a 100,000 Btu furnace The ‘Cost Data’ file under ‘Supporting Documents’ provides prices on a range of furnace sizes This provides a range of costs for 90% AFUE furnaces from 60,000 Btu to 140,000 Btu. Per unit costs ($/KBtu) ranges from $21.53 to $12.13, respectively The cost workbook section – Can use either statistical summary or individual price observations For example, the per unit equipment measure cost for 90% AFUE 100,000 furnaces ranges from to $12.31 to $16.52 based on 9 observations Cost Data Defining Cost Parameters

    31. DEER Non-weather Sensitive Measure Detail

    32. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • CFL Lighting • Refrigerators • Clothes Washers & Dryers • Dishwashers • Water Heating • Swimming Pool Pumps

    33. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • CFL LightingMeasure Impact = (delta watts/unit * hours/day * days/year * In Service Rate) / 1000 watts/kWh Demand Impact =delta watts/unit * In Service Rate * Peak Hour Load Share The “In Service Factor” is an estimate of the percentage of lamps that are actually used. It is a rough estimate based on utility experience. • .9 to be used for all residential CFL programs • .92 to be used for non-residential rebate or giveaway programs • 1.0 to be used for verified installation programs. Labeled “SPC” in measure name Hours of Operation/Day” and “Peak Hour Load Share” from KEMA CFL Metering Study

    34. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • CFL Lighting – Example (14W CFL replace 60W Inc)Measure Impact = (46W * 2.34 hours/day * 365 days/year * 0.9) / 1000 watts/kWh = 35.4 kWh Demand Impact = 46W * 0.9 * 0.081 = 3.35 W

    35. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • RefrigeratorsUsed the Energy Star calculator available on-line at: http://www.energystar.gov Key Input values for the calculator: Refrigerator Type (top, side, or bottom mount freezer) Ice through the door (yes or no) Refrigerator fresh volume (cubic feet) Refrigerator freezer volume (cubic feet)

    36. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Washers Utilized the three recommended Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Tiers for Modified Energy Factor:Used the Energy Star calculator (that utilizes an EF rather than MEF) on-line at:http://www.energystar.gov Estimated the equivalent EF value for CEE MEF values from Energy Star list of approved washers Other key Energy Star variables include: Number of wash cycles/year (E Star value is 392 cycles) Washer capacity (three sizes – 1.5, 2.65, and 3.5 cubic feet) Further disaggregated impacts by water heat and clothes dryer fuel types Fuel impact disagreegations based on ‘Efficiency Vermont” estimates Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.417. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

    37. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Washer – Example (Tier 3 2.65 cu.ft) Measure Impact = (cycles/year * capacity / base EF) – (cycles/year * capacity / measure EF) = (392 * 2.65 / 1.58) – (392 * 2.65 / 4.94) = 447 kWh Demand Impact = Measure Impact * energy/peak factor = 447 kWh * 0.417 = 186.4 W

    38. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Dryer1993 National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA) minimum efficiency used for base technology: EF = 3.01 for electric dryers EF = 2.67 for gas dryersUsed DOE test procedure guidelines for: Drying cycles per year = 416 UEC of 2.33 kWh/cycle for electric (969 kWh/year) UEC of 8.95 kBtu/cycle for gas (37.2 therms/year) Assumed 416 cycles represented Single Family Assumed 250 cycles for Multi-Family (CEC estimate of 60% less use by MF) Energy savings 5% of energy use. This is a carryover from previous 2001 DEER Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.371. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

    39. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Clothes Dryer – Example (SF electric) Measure Impact = Electric base use * Savings Percentage = 969 kWh * 0.05 = 48 kWh Demand Impact = Measure Impact * energy/peak factor = 48 kWh * 0.371 = 17.8 W

    40. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • DishwasherUsed the Energy Star calculator available on-line at: http://www.energystar.gov Key Input values for the calculator: Base Energy Factor (EF) = 0.46 Measure Energy Factor = 0.58 Annual wash cycle (DOE test procedure) = 215 (assume SF) MF wash cycles (assumed to be ~75% of SF) = 160 • Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.371. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

    41. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Water HeatingMeasures: High efficiency water heater (electric EF=0.93, gas EF=0.63) Heat pump water heater (EF=2.9) Point of use water heater low flow showerhead (from 2.5 to 2.0 gallons per minute) Pipe wrap Faucet aerators • Note: Removed water heater blankets because they’re obsolete on models made after 1990. Savings expressed as % of base use Base use varied by utility service area (same method as 2001) • Demand impact based on a energy/peak factor of 0.22. This is carryover from previous 2001 DEER

    42. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Water HeatingMeasure Saving %: High efficiency water heater – electric - 5.4% High efficiency water heater – gas - 5.0% Heat pump water heater – 69.7% Point of use water heater – 15.0% low flow showerhead – 4.0% Pipe wrap – 4.0% Faucet aerators – 3.0%

    43. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresResidential Measures • Pool PumpsSingle speed and two speed included Relied on PG&E and SCE engineers for calculating impacts: General assumptions: Average pool size of 25,000 gallons Average water turnover rate of 6-8 hours Average pump motor demand of 1.75 kVA Typical filtration time of 4 to 6 hours For single speed motors, motor downsizing and runtime reductions assumed

    44. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Interior Lighting • Exterior Lighting • Cooking • Copy Machine • Water Heating • Vending Machine Controls • High Efficiency Motors • Agriculture

    45. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Interior Lighting Measures:CFL screw-in lamps CFL hardwire fixtures High intensity discharge (HID) lamps Premium T8 lamps Dimming Ballasts De-lamping fluorescent 4 ft and 8 ft fixtures • Note: T-12 removed from DEER as a base case because of new federal guidelines. However, it may be legitimate in lamp/ballast (only) change outs.

    46. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Interior Lighting – Basic MethodologyMeasure Impact = (delta watts/unit * hours/day * days/year * In Service Rate) / 1000 watts/kWh Demand Impact = delta watts/unit * In Service Rate * Peak Hour Load Share

    47. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Exterior Lighting & Exit Signs High intensity discharge (HID) lamps Exit Signs Timeclocks Photocells

    48. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Exterior Lighting & Exit Signs MethodologyHID lamps: delta watts saved * hours of use (4,100 hours) no peak impactsExit Signs: delta watts saved * 8760 hours * Interactive Effects peak = delta watts * Interactive effects * 1.0 (coincidence factor)Timeclocks & Photocells: watts controlled * hours of control no peak impacts

    49. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures • Cooking High efficiency fryers (gas & electric) High efficiency griddle (gas) Hot food holding cabinet Connectionless steamer

    50. Non-Weather Sensitive MeasuresNon-Residential Measures Cooking - Methodology Relied primarily on the PG&E technology briefsFor each of these measures, the energy savings calculation methodology is of the form: Savings = (APECRBase – APECREfficient) * Daily Hours * Days Where: APECR = The Average Production Energy Consumption Rate/hour Daily Hours = 12 Days = 365